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Full text of "American druggist"

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THE UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 

G>l v5.05 
N & 



I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/americandruggist5819unse 



American Druggist 



AND 



Pharmaceutical Record 



A Semi-monthly Illustrated 
Journal of Practical Pharmacy 



CASWELL A. MAYO, Ph.G., 



EDITOR 



THOMAS J. KEENAN, 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Volume LVIII. 



January to June, 191 1 



NEW YORK: 

Published by AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING CO., 62 to 68 West Broadway, 



1911. 



INDEX TO VOLUME LVIII. 



Page 

Acacia and its use, Lascoff.... 67 
Acid, uric, quantitative de- 
termination of 315 

Accounting, short cut in figur- 
ing 35i, 390 

to determine the cost of 

goods 322, 390 

Addition, quick method of 390 

Adulteration of belladonna 10 

Advertising, criticisms of cur- 
rent 16, 47, 79, 114, 147. 
181, 218, 250, 282, 321, 350, 

380 

mediums, show cards as 284 

prescription business to doc- 
tors 3*7 

profitable and unprofitable, 
Frank Farrington 147 

schemes, E. W. Spony on, 77, 

146 

soda >8i 

street car, for retailers 78 

thermometers 319 

Aether anaestheticus, Aranii 72 

Wiggers 72 

Alabama Board questions 392 

Albany College, group 388 

Albumin, improvement on Hell- 
er's test for 212 

in urine, detection of minute 

quantities of 217 

Alcohol, quantitative estimation 

of quick 44 

solidified 247 

Alkaloids, formation and distri- 
bution of, in poppy 14 

Almond oil for nasal sprays 247 

Aloin, coloration from, with 

tinctures 216 

Alumni, New York, ball of 90 

Alypin, as an anaesthetic 72 

Ambergris, source of 12 

Amido and amino, use of terms. 216 
Ammonia, estimation of, in pyri- 
dine 144 

free, estimation of 212 

Ampul, new normal drop 212 

Amylene, as an anaesthetic 72 

Anaemorenine as an anaesthetic 72 

Anaesthesine, Ritsert's 72 

Ana-sthetic, dental 143, 314 

Anaesthetics, Baskerville on 72, 

73, 108, 109, 139 
Anaesthin and Anaesthol (Speyer) 73 

Anaesthol, Meyer 73 

Weidig 73 

Anaestiform, Oppenheimer 73 

Analgos, Stephan 73 

Analysis, milk, for pharmacists. 21 1 
Anderson, William C, outlook 

for the drug clerk 106 

Anesin, 73 

Aneson 73 

Animal organs, preparation of 

extracts of 347 

Anniversary sales, Frank Far- 
rington on 35° 

Antidolorin 73 

Antikamnia case before court of 

appeals 258 

Chemical Company wins ap- 
peal 368 

Antiseptic mouth wash 112 

soluble, new 247 

Antiseptic ointment, nongreasy.. 14 
Antitrading stamp law, Massa- 
chusetts, unconstitutional ..263 

Antitumen 14 1 

Ants, to destroy 279 

Apothecary, origin of word.... 39 

Aranii's anaesthetic ether 72 

Armstrong, T. S 401 

Arnold's dental anodyne or local 

anaesthetic 73 

Amy, H. O., portrait sketch... 407 
Arrhenius, Dr. Svante A., 289, 340 
Arsenic, estimation of in atoxyl 

and arsacetin 3'5 

Arsenical group of remedies.... 6 
Ash, determination of in plant 

and animal matter 349 

Ashbrook, C. S., services of 

State Association 383 

Assay, physiological *7 2 

Associations: 

American Perfumers' 255 

American Pharmaceutical 197, 

290 

Branch, Baltimore 234 

Chicago 95. 9* 



Page 

Associations (Continued) : 

New York 194, 359 

Philadelphia 230, 266 

Washington ..128, 141, 260 
American Therapeutic Society. 231 

Baltimore druggists' 166 

Drug Exchange 128 

Board of Trade and Transpor- 
tation, New York 360 

Boston druggists' 9 2 

Brooklyn Pharmaceutical 161, 

187, 195 

Alumni 162 

California 353. 4°4 

Chemistry, applied, interna- 
tional congress of 291 

Chicago retail 167 

Detroit retail 167 

German Apothecaries' 161 

Indiana 400 

Iowa 404 

Kings County ..54, !9 2 » 263, 332 
Long Island Drug Club, 160, 195 

Massachusetts 163, 404 

Michigan 4°4 

Missouri 191 

National, of Pharmacologists, 

93, 228 
Pharmaceutical Society, 

107, 124 

New Jersey 401 

New York Board of Trade 

and Transportation 360 

County 194, 261, 332 

State 396 

Drug Club 152 

Pennsylvania 335, 4°5 

Philadelphia, affiliates with N. 

A. R. D 83 

P. A. R. D 59, 199 

Philadelphia Drug Exchange, 

anniversary 83 

Presidents of local 128 

Proprietary 356 

Southern, of Boards 370 

W. O. N. A. R. D 193 

branch, Chicago 95 

Cincinnati 353 

Astor hotel pharmacy 49 

Atoxyl, test for 14 

Azure-eosinine, stain, quick 
method for 144 

Baking powder 75 
Balm, complexion 74 

Baskerville, Charles, list of an- 
aesthetics. . 72, 73, 108, 109, 139 

Bayse, T. C, portrait 400 

Beardsley, A. H., portrait 357 

Beck, W. R., services of state 

association 382 

Becker, Bishop-Babcock, consoli- 
dation 238 

Bed bugs, non inflammable in- 
secticide for 216 

Belladonna adulteration, Vander- 

kleed on 10 

Benesol 73 

Beringer, George M., on petrox 

preparations -I75> 215 

drug standards, unofficial... 15 
Bigelow, Clarence O., portrait. .224 
Biological standardization by 

pharmacists 173 

products in drug store 379 

Bisulphite-fuchsin test for for- 
maldehyde 3'3 

Bismuth subnitrate, test for in 

salicylate . . : 388 

Blaud's Pills, new formula for.. 112 

Blocki, John, portrait 255 

Boeglin, C. H., how to make 

fountain pay 393 

Board fines, collection of 113 

Boards of Pharmacy: 

Florida, 167; . Illinois, 200; 
Kansas, 368; Massachusetts, 
92; Missouri, 167; Ohio, 94; 
Pennsylvania, 199; Southern 
Association of, 20; Utah, 
portrait of, 324; secretaries 
of, 287, 324, 352. 

Board questions, Alabama 39 2 

Indiana 253 

New York 82, 119 

Pennsylvania 354 

Wisconsin 142 

Bodemann, W., telephone in the 

drug store n 

Bohemia, infusorial earth in... 68 



Page 

Book Notices: 

Bruder, Otto E., The Modern 
Pharmacist, 46; History and 
Chemistry of the Essential 
Oils, 45; Joseph, Dr. Max, 
A Short Handbook of Cos- 
metics, 46; Mahin Advertis- 
ing Co., data book, 46; 
Mitchell, C. Ainsworth, Oil: 
animal, vegetable, essential 
and mineral, 45; Munn & 
Co., technical formulas and 
processes. 45. 
Books for beginners in phar- 
macy 314, 387 

on perfumery 314 

on toilet soaps 314 

Bottles, allowance for returned.. 3 

Bottwini's anaestheticum 73 

Bradley, William A., portrait. . .295 
Bromides, estimation of chlorides 

in 316 

Brooklyn college group 389 

Bruder, O. E., manual of prac- 
tical pharmacy 46 

Bug killer, non inflammable 216 

Butyl-chloral hydrate as anaes- 
thetic 73 

/"•affeine in fountain beverages.133 
^ removal of, from coffee... 44 

Candy business, building up 77 

sales, helping, McKany 115 

Calisher, A. B., portrait 255 

Capsules without tops on 248 

Caramel, test for 246 

Carbon dioxide pencils for cau- 
tery 145 

Carpenter, F. N., portrait 295 

Cascara. bitterless extract with 

zinc oxide 217 

Cautery pencils, carbon dioxide. 145 

Cement, rubber 13, 280 

Chandler, Prof. Charles F., de- 
gree conferred on 239 

Chemists' Club building 172 

Chemistry, applied, congress of. 150 
recent achievements and prob- 
lems in ^278 

Chemists' Building 188 

Chemotherapy, science of 5, 103 

Cheney, Frank J., portrait 356 

Cherry laurel water, test for 113 

Chilblains, treatment of 105 

Chloral and magnesia, incompat- 
ibility of 145 

Chlorides, estimation of in bro- 
mides 316 

Chlorophyll, crystallizable 112 

Christine, W. B., portrait 327 

Chromium sulphate, dose of 43 

Chrysarobin stains, removal of.. 75 
Claims, curative before supreme 

court 135, 289, 328, 368 

Clerk, the outlook for the 106 

Clerk's view of corporation store 

work no 

Coca Cola suit 191. 259 

Cocaine law, Colorado 353 

sales, Swann on 76 

sellers in Pittsburg punished. 248 
Coblentz, Virgil, resigns from 
New York College of Phar- 
macy 225 

Cockroaches, extermination of... 279 

riddance from 217 

Coffee, removal of caffeine from 44 

Colchicin, test for 3'5 

Collapse, Japanese treatment of. 113 

Colleges of Pharmacy : 

Brooklyn, graduates, 330; Buf- 
falo University, silver anni- 
versary of, 366: City of 
New York, commencement, 
320; Philadelphia, 164. 189, 
364; Pittsburg, 392; Temple 
University, graduates of, 366. 
Coloring agents, law covering 

use of '33 

Conference, Pan American com- 
mercial 100 

Congress of applied chemistry. . 150 
Corporation drug store from the 

drug clerk's standpoint no 

Cosby, C. R., portrait 360 

Cosmetic formulas 74 

Cost of doing business 274 

of goods, to determine 322 

Crede's ointment 75. 216 

Cream massage, vanishing. .43. 180 



Page 

Creams, shaving, formulas for.. 112 
Croatia, difference between phar- 
macy and drug store in in 

Crowley, J. P., portrait 3°' 

Cuba, Christmas in, Remington 69 

Culicide, formula for 216 

Cutter for glass tubing in 

Cyrus, Karl O., portrait 219 

Davis, Charles H., services of 
state association 381 

Dayton, Walter H., portrait. 

sketch of 324 

Dental anodyne, Arnold's 73 

Digitalin 243 

Digitalis and its early uses 111 

Dispensing by doctors in Eng- 
land °5 

Discoveries, drug, of the nine- 
teenth century 277 

Doctors dispensing in England.. 65 

Dohme, A. R. L., portrait 128 

Dorvault, the greatest French 

pharmacist 344 

Dorvault's L'Officine 34 2 

Dreyfus, William, germicides 

and antiseptics 3 

Drop, normal, ampul 212 

Drug clerk, outlook for 106 

growing in Florida 387 

law, instruction in 206 

standards, unofficial 15 

trade bowlers at Atlantic City. 327 
Druggist and the United Stores 

Association 3°6 

Drugless drug store 2 

Drugs, crude, government in- 
spection of 240 

habit forming, Dr. Wiley on. 293 

standardization of 66 

Dyestuffs in medicine 35. 41 

Earth, infusorial, in Bohemia. 68 
Ebers papyrus reproduced. 41 

Echinacea angustifolia 375 

Edison's anaestheticum 73 

Education, changes in, in dreat 

Britain 34 

Educational alliance, lectures on 

pharmacists I2 3 

Ehrlich's side chain theory 103 

Elixir of saccharin 43 

red color for 246 

Emanuel, Louis, on Pennsyl- 
vania labeling law 44 

Embalming fluids 180 

Emerson, Isaac E., portrait 129 

Emulsion, cod liver oil 43 

formula, dry >3 

new test for 243 

Emulsions, improved method of 

making 242 

Endowments, pharmaceutical . . 3 
Entertainment funds, associa- 
tion 239 

Ergot, new alkaloid of 144 

Ergothioneine '44 

Error, liability for 178 

Ether, Aranii's anaesthetic 72 

hydrogen dioxide in 8 

Wigger's anaesthetic 7 2 

Evans, Arthur H., services of 

state association 382 

Examination questions. Alabama 

board 39- 

Indiana board 253 

New York board 82, 119 

Pennsylvania board 354 

Wisconsin board 142 

Extracts of animal organs, prep- 
aration of 347 

Eye, foreign bodies in 247 

Fairchild, S. W., honorary de- 
gree for 339 

portrait sketch of 5". 3&7 

Farrington. criticism of current 
advertising, 

16 47, 79, 114, 147. 181, 218, 
250. 282, 321. 350. 380 

Fehr, George W., portrait 127 

Filters, conical, to increase the 

filtration surface in. 277 

Florida, drug growing in 387 

Fluck. Frank W., portrait 254 

Food ' and Drugs Act. curative 

claims not amenable to 368 

interpreting the -3°7 

to investigate expendi- 
tures under 33 1 

therapeutic claims not 
within province of. 

328. 374 



/V c 



INDEX TO VOLUME LI' II I. 



Page 

Foote, Bernard, building up a 

candy business •• 77 

Formaldehyde, bisulphite-fuchsin 

test for 313 

quantitative estimation of 179 

Formula bill in Pennsylvania 

legislature 102 

Formulas, soda fountain 3" 

Foster Bill I, 33. 45, 64 

argument against 9°. 99 

hearing on 20, 22 

France, Thomas J., on Foster 

Bill 90 

French, Howard B., portrait 223 

Furniture polish 279 

Gelatin, preparation of iodine 
and bromine 349 

Gentian root, composition of 315 

German Apothecaries Society, on 

Foster Bill 9° 

German law, muddle in 4 

pharmacopoeia, new 35 

Germicides and antiseptics 209 

Giesma's stain, quick method for 

use of 144 

Ginger ales, law governing 134 

Gitalin, a new glucoside 31? 

Glass cleaner ana polisher. .. 13, 180 

etching on 43 

mirroring 7» 

tube cutter iji 

Glucoside of the round leaved 

wintergreen 349 

Glossary of botanical and chemi- 
cal terms 387 

Glycerin, test for 248 

(iodding, John G., portrait 

sketch of 290 

Gold, surgical needles of 7 6 

Goodwin, Frank E., on deter- 
mining cost 3 22 

short cut in accounting 351 

Greek hay seed 278 

Grindelia robusta 14 

Guaranty, registration of 75 

Guilford, Harry B., portrait 83 

Hallberg fund, memorial .192 
Halogen, simplified gravi- 
metric determination of.... 113 
Hamann, William M., portrait. .361 
Havana, University of, Reming- 
ton 7i 

Hearings, amendment of federal 

law concerning 83 

'•Hebenon, Cursed," Dr. John 

Knott on 275 

Heller's albumin test, improve- 
ment on 212 

Henderson, A. D., portrait 295 

Herbs, fresh, unreliable features 

of 140 

Herold. H. A., on law and the 

druggist. 177, 213, 244, 345. 377 

Hoffmann's Anodyne 348 

Horse serum extract 139 

Hot plate, uses in pharmacy ... .379 
Hydrogen dioxide, acidity of... 15 

in ether 8 

Hynson. H. P., changing con- 
ditions in pharmacy 309 

portrait 309 

Indiana pharmacy board ques- 
tions 253 

pharmaceutical association. . . .400 
Indicator, a new, from radishes. 144 
Injections, sterilization of solu- 
tions for 346 

Ink eradicators 314 

stamping pad, red 180 

Inspection, government, of crude 

drugs 240 

Insurance, British national 375 

Interchange of certificates, Mis- 
souri's attitude on 22 

International pharmacy 374 

Iodine and bromine gelatin, 

preparation of 349 

antiseptic value of 375 

tincture, keeping qualities of.. 42 
volumetric estimation of small 

quantities 217 

Iowa association 404 

James. F. K., Hotel Astor 
pharmacy 49 

Javelle water, preservation of... 143 
Johnson Cancer Cure Case, U.» 
S. Supreme Court rules 
against government in 368 

l£ ahn, Joseph, portrait 263 

Kautsu, Japanese treat- 
ment of collapse 113 

Keenan, Thomas J., on chemo- 
therapy 103 

Keene, George, portrait and 
sketch of 249 

Keratin pill coating 43 

Kings County Pharmaceutical 
Society 54, 192, 263. 332 



Page 

Knott, John, A.. M., M. D., on 

"Cursed Hebenon" ••275 

Koch, Christopher, portrait 262 

Felix, carrying one's own 

shop 384 

Kraemer, Henry, Echinacea an- 

gustifolia 375 

Kriebs, F. D., services of state 

association 383 

T abeling law, Pennsylvania.... 44 

'-' Labels, paste for 14 

Lanolin, salycilic acid with 280 

Law and the druggist, H. A. 
Herold, 177, 213, 244, 345, 

377. 385 

Law, food and drugs, constitu- 
tional 190 

food and drugs of middle ages 38 
New York, extra-pharmaceuti- 
cal 292 

New York pharmacy, con- 
struction of 244, 385 

Pennsylvania, revising 280 

pharmacy, of 1231 113 

prescription and the 13 

need for uniformity in 1 

La Wall, Charles H., portrait. .230 

benefits of organization 381 

Lascoff, J. Leon, acacia and its 

uses 67 

Lee, Harry D., conduct of a 

successful fountain 149 

William E., portrait 127 

Legislation, proposed Pennsyl- 
vania pharmacy 262 

Legislature, Massachusetts, drug- 
gists in 92 

Leverett, J., advertising to doc- 
tors 317 

Liggit Company, Rikers try to 
prevent carrying out plans 

of 328 

Louis K., portrait 84 

Lilly, J. K., banquet to 124 

portrait 33 1 

Lime water, apparatus for keep- 
ing 12, 74 

Liniment for animals 13 

Liquor carbonis detergens 143 

Liquor on prescriptions, state 

law and 24 

Listerine, listerseptine an in- 
fringement on 371 

Lloyd, John Uri, portrait 276 

on vanilla, its history 276 

Longfellow, reference of to 

pharmacy law of 1231 113 

Lowe, Col. John W., portrait. . .299 
Lubricating oil for fine machin- 
ery 216 

Letters to Editor: 

Beringer, G. M., standards 
for unofficial drugs 15 

Bodemann, Wm., pharmacy 
board secretaries underpaid. 217 
telephone etiquette and busi- 
ness 316 

Emanuel, Louis, Pennsylvania 
labeling requirement 44 

Hilton, S. L., assay of magma 
magnesia 349 

Kirchgessner, W. C, Grand 
Rapids druggists condemn 
Foster Bill 113 

Lyons, A. B., a new test for 
glycerin 248 

Mason, F. S., on Dorvault. . .388 

McKee, Joseph, suggestion 
for the druggists' library 145 

Ogier, W. R., collection of 
fines by boards of pharmacy. 113 

Raubenheimer, Otto, posses- 
sion of U. S. P. and N. F. 
obligatory on New York 
druggists 44 

Stalwart, A., objects to cut 
rate advertising 316 

Swann, S. V. B., "Who's to 
Blame" 76 

Taylor, H. L., on New York 
State pharmaceutical library. 388 

Tobin, John M., capsules 
without tops on 248 

Wallace, John C, the revision 
of the Pennsylvania phar- 
macy law 280 

Walton, L. L., cocaine sellers 
in Pittsburg punished 248 

White, T. Ashford, Longfel- 
low's reference to the phar- 
macy law of 1 23 1 113 

]VT achinery, tablet 75 

Magma magnesia, assay of.349 
improved 243 

Magnesia and chloral, incom- 
patibility of 145 

Mahin advertising data book. . 46 

Mann bill to amend national se- 
rum law 329 



Page 

Market, drug and chemical, re- 
view of: 30, 31, 6i, 62, 97, 98, 
131, 168, 201, 236, 237, 269, 
270, 3°3. 304, 337, 338, 372. 
373. 408. 

Marsh, Frank B., portrait 255 

Massage creams 43 

Master, Walter, some whys and 

wherefores in pharmacy 110 

Mayer, Joseph L., milk analysis 

for pharmacists 211 

hot plate, uses of 380 

Measures, need of accurate 316 

Medal for soda dispensers 339 

Medico-Chirurgical College, Phil- 
adelphia graduating exer- 
cises of 365 

Meerschaum pipe, to color 216 

Metric prescribing 312 

Metz, Herman A., on dyestuffs 

in medicine 41 

Meyer. W., ansesthol 73 

Michigan association 404 

Miles case, decision in 272 

dissenting opinion in 258 

decision. John W. Errant on.. 237 

plan declared illegal 206 

price protection plan disap- 
proved 221 

Military pharmacists. Napoleon's. 9 
Milk analysis for pharmacists. .. 21 1 

Milk, excretion of drugs in 15 

Miller, H. S., portrait 182 

T. Ashby. portrait sketch 287 

Mirrors, manufacture of 75 

Mitchel, C. A., on commercial 

oils 45 

Mooney, John H., portrait 327 

Morphine ordinance modified. .. 12 1 
ordinance, N. Y., amended.. 101 

N. Y., further amended 187 

Morphine salts, odor of 14 

Mosquito lotion, formula for 216 

remedies 279 

Mosquitoes, fumigant for 216 

Mouth wash, antiseptic 112 

Mtilford Company, H. K., and 

New York World 186 

Mullin, new sugar from 144 

Mutz, T. S-, services of state 

association 382 

McEHiff, George W., portrait ... 1 58 

Mclntyre. Ewen, portrait 298 

McMurtrie, D., portrait 407 

Mrs. D., portrait 407 

McPherson, O. P., autobiogra- 
phy ot an advertiser 80 

^Japoleon's military pharmacists 9 
National formulary prepa- 
rations, notes on 241 

Neimeyer's pill 179 

New Jersey association 401 

New York College of Pharmacy, 

commencement 320 

group of officers 397 

Conference 187 

opposes Turley Bill 324 

County Society ....194, 261, 332 

health board ordinance 387 

Nicotine in tobacco extracts, es- 
timation of 276 

Normal drop ampul 212 

Northwestern School of Phar- 
macy, quarter-century cele- 
bration of 287 

Novorenal 109 

Nurses, discounts to 134 

(~)ba',go 109 

y ~' Obesity, treatment for.... 14s 

Obituary : 

Amend. Bernard G 231 

Attfield, Dr. John 207 

Baltzly, Albert B 264 

Blaney, Frank M 87 

Bond, Tohn T 334 

Craig, W. H 88 

Cutts, Fosvvell C 87 

Dorsey, Dr. Frank 123 

Eliel, Leo . .' 100, 122 

Elliott, Boyce 231 

Engelhorn. Dr. Friedrich 88 

Evans, Lee M 87 

Gardner, Robert W 88 

Hennecke. Albert V 123 

Graves, Riley M 88 

Hays. Newlands 88 

Heydenreich, Emile 194 

Lewis, Alexander Richard. .. .264 

Lord, Samuel L 87 

Loring, Frederick Morris 231 

O'Connell, D. F 123 

Plimpton, George A 87 

Procter. Wallace ••341 

Pettet. Charles W 88 

Richardson, Samuel W 333 

Sappington, Dr. Richard 334 

Schwarz. Gustave A 296 

Spalding, Warren Alphonso. . .264' 

Stafford. Henrv H 333 

Tufts, Arthur G 87 

Turner, Japhtha C 88 

Van Schaack, J. C 296 



Page 

Obituary (continued): 

Wells, Edward G 296 

Wells, Henry 87 

Whitman, Horace F 88 

Williams John K 333 

Smith, Winthrop 123 

Woodward, Harlow E 87 

Obtundo 109 

Odor of morphine salts 14 

Officine, Dorvault's, review of.. 342 
Ogier, William R., on collection 

of board fines 113 

Oil, cod liver, pleasant emulsion 

of 43 

lubricating for fine machinery. 216 

olive, new adulterant of 315 

Ointment, compound resorcin. . .241 

nongreasy antiseptic 14 

Wilkinson's 314, 348 

Wilson's 314, 348 

Opium bill, Foster 1 

Opium poppy, formation of al- 
kaloids in 14 

derivatives, sale of, in New 

York 387 

Oppenheimer's ansesthiform .... 73 
Orthonal 109 

Daeonol, a new antispasmodic. 280 
* Pan-American Conference, 
„ . 65, 100 

Papaverine, cautery action of 

synthetic 217 

and cryptopine 14 

Papyrus, Ebers, reproduction of. 11 
Paraffin and petrolatum, removal 

of 42 

Paranephrin - cocaine - subcutin 

(Ritsert) 109 

Paste, label n 

Pear leaves, glucoside in 112 

Pearson, W. A., biological prod- 
ucts in drug store 379 

Pellotine I44 

Pennsylvania board questions. . .354 

drugs act, enforcement of 299 

labeling law 44 

regulations tested 2 

pharmacy law 293 

legislation, proposed 262 

regulations, court test for 19 

Permanganate poisoning, treat- 
ment of 12 

Petrox preparations, Beringer, 

175, 215 

Petroxolinum preparations 1-^6 

Phalacrosis i 40 

Pharmacist, legal relations of 

(see Herold) 213 

Pharmacists of Napoleon's ai- 

mies 9 

Pharmacologists, National Asso- 
ciation of (see associations) 
Pharmacopoeia, French, commit- 
tee on revision of 277 

enforcement of 373 

German 35 

galenicals of 137 

solubilities in the 208 

Pharmacopceial meetings in 

Philadelphia 329 

Pharmacy Board questions, Ala- 
bama 384 

Indiana 253 

New York 82, 119 

Pennsylvania -354 

Wisconsin 142 

changing conditions in, H. P. 

Hynson 309 

Philadelphia College of Pharma- 
cy. French's portrait pre- 
sented to 223 

graduating exercises of... 362 

Phosphorus rat paste 112 

Pill coating, keratin 44 

Pill counter 215 

Neimeyer , 70 

Pills, Blaud's, new formula for. 112 

Pine, meerschaum, to color 216 

Piperazine and theophyline, a 

combination of 348 

Pistols and carbolic acid 99 

Plecanthrine 388 

Poison bottle bill, proposed, 

294, 339 
sales, regulation in middle 

. ages 39 

Poisoning, permanganate, treat- 
ment of 12 

Polish for glass 13 

Prescription law, proposed new, 

180, 230 

original should be retained... 36 
ownership of 213. 278 

Prescriptions and the pharmacy 
law 13 

Pritchard, B. E., portrait 300 

Problems, ancient, in modern 

pharmacy 37 

Proprietaries, physicians respon- 
sible for prescribing 288 

Proprietary medicines, stamp tax 
on 326 



86 I 89 I 



INDEX TO VOLUME LVIII. 



Page 

Polypharmacy in ancient days..ni 
Potassium iodide, saturated solu- 
tion of 1 80 

Powder, tooth, antiseptic 217 

Propazin 109 

Purgative, saline, method of ac- 
tion of 13 

Pyramidon, new reaction of 247 

Pyridine, estimation of ammonia 

in 144 

Pyrocain 109 

Questions, pharmacy board, 
Alabama 392 

Indiana 25,1 

New York 82, 119 

Pennsylvania 354 

Wisconsin 142 

Ouinoleine, sulphosalicylate of.. 348 
Quiz Compend 216 

Raubenheimer, Otto, lime wa- 
ter apparatus 74 

possession of U. S. P. and N. 

F. obligatory 44 

Rat paste without phosphorus. .. 1 12 
Registration, reciprocal, in Ala- 
bama 196 

Rehfuss. Charles, portrait 91 

Reid drug store. Baltimore, il- 
lustration of 116 

Remington, J. P.. Christmas in 

Cuba 69 

Renkert, C. M., benefits of - or- 
ganization 384 

Reynes' anesthetic mixture 72 

Resosalyn, a soluble antiseptic. .247 
Rhubarb and soda mixture. 

Kings Co. formula for 43 

Riker interests halt United 

Drug reorganization 260 

Riker tries to prevent carrying 
out of Liggitt Company 

plans 323 

Ritehey. William P.. portrait. .222 

Ritsert's anaesthesine 72 

subcutin 109 

Robertson, Alice May, portrait. 320 

Roche's embrocation 112 

Rohrman. F. R., portrait 154 

Romanowski, stain, quick meth- 
od for using 144 

Ross. Edwin, portrait 255 

Rwbber cement 13 

Caccharin, elixir of 43 

use of condemned 272 

in food forbidden 291 

Salicylates, discoloration of 180 

Salicylic acid in wool fat 280 

Santonin, estimation of. in tab- 
lets 387 

Salvarsan, administration of 38. 104 

chemistry of 104 

fraudulent exploitation of 205 

at the New York College 55 

patent 7 

J. Turner on 8 



Pace 

Schleich's anaesthetics 139 

Schu'ze. Louis, portrait 234 

Seeds, sunflower, uses of 143 

Senna, modified formula for 

compound infusion of 144 

Serum law, Mann bill to amend. 329 
Shaving creams, formulas for ..112 

Shaw, James 0., portrait 361 

Sheehy, Helen, portrait 320 

Sherley Bill, drug trade opposes. 360 
Show cards as advertising me- 
diums 284 

Shull, Carl W., portrait 127 

Shuman. R. R., the iceless era 
in soda fountain construc- 
tion ...151 

Side lines in drug store ..173, 178 
Six hundred and six (See Sal- 
varsan). 

Soap, surgeons' grit 217 

Soda dispensing, world's cham- 
pionship medals for... 343. 395 
fountain, advertising, fancy... 183 

chain competition in 183 

conduct of a successful foun- 
tain, the. Harry D. Lee 149 

development of the 135 

fancy drinks for 184 

formulas 252, 286, 323 

hints 220 

luncheon at 152b 

neighborhood paying 392 

menus 185, 220 

productive 185 

rules 286 

women not popular at 155 

hot, in Baltimore 118 

service, rapid 173, 343 

shaker's heart 196 

water advertising 181 

Sodium salicylate, discoloration 

of 180 

Solubilities in the pharmacopoeia 208 
Solutions for injections,, sterili- 
zation of 346 

Solution, potassium iodide, sat- 
urated 180 

Speyer's annesthin and anaesthol . 73 
Spirochaeta pallida, quick stain 

for 315 

Sponges, bleaching 143 

Spony, E. W., advertising 

schemes 146 

attracting a crowd 77, 281, 318 
Stains, chrysarobin, removal of. 75 

drug and their removal 71 

Giemsa's, quick method for 

using 144 

Stamping pad, ink. red 180 

Stanislaus. I. V. S.. on Greek 

hay seed 278 

portrait 150 

Stamp law, Massachusetts anti- 
trading, unconstitutional ..263 

tax, fighting the 358. 373 

proposed 305 

on proprietary medicines. .. .326 



Page 

Stecker, A. P., portrait 167 

Stephan's analgos 73 

Sterilization of solution for in- 
jections 346 

Stone, Clarence G., portrait 361 

Strychnine, new reaction from.. 105 

Subcutin 139 

Sulphosalicylate of quinoleine. . .348 
Summer advertising, Frank Far- 

rington on 321 

Sutures, horse hair 247 

Swann, S. V. B., on cocaine 

sales 76 

Syllabus. pharmaceutical and 

board questions 63 

Syrupus pini comp 241 

Tablet making machinery 75 

* Tablets, variability and un- 
reliability of 349 

Tar, pine, and its properties. ... 246 

Teaspoon, danger in 63 

Teeth, judging character by.... 142 
Telephone, in the drug store, 

Bodemann 11 

etiquette • . . 273 

Ter. ben., meaning of 387 

message, collecting charge for.117 

Theocine, estimation of 247 

Therapeutic claims under na- 
tional law 136, 374 

Thermometers, advertising ....319 

Thibault's local anaesthetic 139 

Thorium, new salts of 31s 

Thum, John K., liquor ferri oxy- 

chloridi 24: 

Thyreoid gland, extracts of.... 65 
Tinctura ferri acetici aetherea. . . 31 5 
Tinctures of fresh herbs, unre- 
liable 140 

Tobacco extracts, estimation of 

nicotine in 276 

Toothfche, applications for 15 

Tooth oowder, antiseptic 217 

health department formula 

for . 313 

Tubing, glass, cutter for 111 

Turley bill 307 

New York conference op- 
poses 324 

World presses 361 

Turner, Joseph L., chemotherapy 
and 606 5 

I T drenin 139 

' Ultraviolet rays, chemical 

action of 247 

decomposition of water by.349 
Unguentum contra decubitum, 
' _ 314, 348 

Crede 75, 216 

solubile 348 

United Drug reorganization 

halted by Riker interests. .. 260 

Company reorganized 84 

Stores Association, the drug- 
gist and the... v 306 



Page 

University of Buffalo, silver an- 
niversary of 366 

Illinois 200 

Uric acid, determination of.... 31 5 
Urine, estimation of organized 

elements in 145 

\7accines, autogenous, prepara- 

™ tion of 179 

Vanderkleed, C. E., belladonna 

adulteration 10 

Vanilla, its history, J. U. Lloyd.276 
Verbascum, new sugar from.... 144 

Vienna Mixture 139 

Vinyldiacetonalkamine 139 

Wfalsh, Dr. James J., ancient 
" problems in modern 1 har- 

macy 37 

Walton, Lucius L., portrait. 293. 352 
Walton's pharmacy, illustrations 

of 3S3 

Wart remover 144 

Wash, antiseptic mouth 112 

Water, cherry laurel, test for.. 113 
decomposition of by ultravio- 
let rays 349 

Tavelle, preservation of 143 

Watermeyer, F. E., portrait. .. .360 

Weber, Ida F., portrait 320 

Weidig's anaesthol 73 

Weight, net, legislation 64 

Welt, anaesthetikum 139 

Whiskey on prescrintion 1 

White, F. Ashford. Napoleon's 

armies q 

Wigger's anaesthetic ether 139 

Wiley, Dr. H. W. on habit 

forming drugs 293 

Wilkinson's ointment 314, 348 

Williams, J. K., on emulsions.. 13 

on paste for labels 14 

Wilson's local anaesthetic 139 

ointment 314, 348 

Window display, white pine tar. 182 

dressing, mass in 283 

trimming for druggists ni> 

Wintergreen, glucoside of the 

round leaved 349 

harvesting and distilling 140 

Wirth, Adam, portrait 158 

Wisconsin board, questions of.. 142 

Wood nanhtha 180 

Wooten, T. V., portrait of.... 125 
Women in pharmacy in Rou- 

mania 34 

Words of interest to pharma- 
cists 316 

World case, a typical 227 

and the druggist 172, 340 

"exposures" 22s 

New York, investigates drug- 
gists 186 

presses Turley bill 361 

Y anthoxylum alatum, constitu- 
yv ents of 348 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



3 



MORE PROFIT FROM YOUR FOUNTAIN 

1 Take advantage of the demand for "StCCPO " Bouillon Cubes. 

T Serve Steero Bouillon at your fountain and add to its profit. 
This will also increase your SALES of 

"STEERO" 

[TRADE-MARK] 

BOUILLON CUBES 

T They sell quickly after one trial because everybody likes 
Steero Bouillon for its delicious flavor and great convenience. 

51 Send for samples and try them yourself. Write for our 

SPECIAL OFFER 

Made by American Kitchen Products Company, New York. 

Distributed and Guaranteed by 

Schieffelin & Co., 202 William St., New York. 

peter moller's 
Cod Liver Oil 

is a pure oil, free from disagreeable taste 
and odor. It digests readily, does not 
cling to the palate, and never "repeats". 

fl It is made and bottled by Peter Moller at 
the Norway fisheries. 

Not sold in bulk. You know you 
get the genuine when you receive the 
flat oval bottle bearing the name of 



Schieffelin & Co., New York, Sole Agents 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



4 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




andMUCIIAGE 



' iTi'NG FLDiO 

■■■TNDJUBU-m 



\ 




BIG PROFIT FOR DRUGGISTS! 

Show Case Assortment 

No. 2500 

$25.00 F. 0. B. New York 

Goods Retail for $45.55 



Davids' Inks require no comment. They have 
been the standard for more than 85 years. The 
above extraordinary offering of a practically 
complete line of our goods has been made pos- 
sible by a rounding up of broken package lots. 
Besides, as an extra inducement, we will give, 
for a limited time, FREE, an ornate show case 
like the accompanying cut. The net cost of assortment — see regular retail 
prices mentioned below— including show case, is $25.00 F.O.B., New York. 



New 

Catalogue 

Number Quantity 

1 i- 12 doz. Quarts Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

2 i-i2 doz. Pints Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

3 i-6 doz. 1-2 Pints Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

6 1-2 doz. 4-0Z. Square Electro Chemical Blue Black Writ- 
ing Fluid • • 

io 3 doz. 2-oz. Square Electro Chemical Blue Black Writ- 
ing Fluid 

130 1-12 doz. Quarts Combined Writing and Copying Ink. 

131 1-12 doz. Pints Combined Writing and Copying Ink... 

132 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Combined Writing and Copying Ink 
135 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Desk Combined Writing and Copying Ink 

80 1-12 doz. Quarts Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid 

81 1-12 doz. Pints Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid 

82 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid 

88 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Square Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writ- 
ing Fluid 

90 3 doz. 2-oz. Square Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writ- 
ing Fluid 

196 1-1 2 doz. Quarts Non-copying Carmine Ink 

195 1-12 doz. Pints Non-copying Carmine Ink 

194 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Non-copying Carmine Ink 

193 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Non-copying Carmine Ink 

191 1-2 doz. 2-oz. Square Non-copying Caimine Ink 

255 1-12 doz. Quarts Blue Writing Ink 

256 1-12 doz. Pints Blue Writing Ink 

257 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Blue Writing Ink 

261 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Pine Writing Ink 

265 1 doz. 2-oz. Square TClue Writing Ink 

296 1-12 doz. Quarts Green Writing Ink 

297 1-12 doz. Pints Green Writing Ink 

298 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Green Writing Ink 

302 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Green Writing Ink 

306 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Green Writing Ink 

276 1-12 doz. Quarts Violet Writing Ink 

277 1-12 doz. Pints Violet Writing Ink 



Goods 
Retail Re- 
Price, tail 
Each for 



.60 
•35 
.20 



.05 1.80 

.80 .So 

.50 ' -50 

• 35 -35 

.10 .60 



.60 



60 



•35 -35 



.10 .60 

.05 1.80 
1. 25 1.25 



•75 
.40 
.20 
■ 15 
.60 
•35 
.20 
.10 
.05 
.60 
• 35 
.20 
.10 
■05 
.60 
•35 



•75 
.40 
.60 
.90 
.60 
•35 
.20 
•30 
.60 
.60 
•3s 
.20 

•30 
.60 
.60 
•35 



New 

Catalogue 

Number Quantity 

278 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Violet Writing Ink 

282 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Violet Writing Ink 

286 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Violet Writing Ink 

240 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Oriental Red Ink 

242 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Oriental Red Ink 

401 1 doz. 2-oz. Liquid Glue 

410 1 doz. 1-2 oz. Rubber Stamp Ink — Assorted Colors.... 
o 1 doz. Rubber Stamp Pads — Assorted Colors 

429 1 doz. New Black Diamond Indelible Marking Outfit 

330 1-2 doz. 2-oz. Lctterine Show Card Ink — Black 

347 1-2 doz. 2-oz. Letterine Show Card Ink — Assorted Colors 

375 1-2 doz. i-oz. White Writing Ink 

361 1-4 doz. i-oz. Gold Writing Ink 

58 1-12 doz. Quarts Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen 

Ink 

57 1-12 doz. Pints Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen 

Ink 

56 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain 

Pen Ink 

55 1-6 doz. 3-0Z. Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen Ink 
54 1-6 doz. 4-oz. Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen Ink 
52 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain 
Pen Ink 

350 1-12 doz. Quarts Black Marking Ink 

525 1-12 doz. Quarts General White Paste 

524 1 - 1 2 doz. Pints General White Paste 

519 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Tip Top White Paste, Water Well 

518 1-2 doz. 3-oz. Jar White Paste 

517 1 doz. 2-oz. Jar White Paste 

516 1 doz. 3-oz. Tubes White Paste 

477 1-12 doz. Quarts Security Mucilage 

478 t-12 doz. Pints Security Mucilage 

47Q 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Security Mucilage 

488 1 doz. 4-oz. Desk General Mucilage 

490 1 doz. 2-oz. Round General Mucilage 

6 1 Pound Scarlet Sealing Wax — 4 Sticks to pound.... 
6 1 Pound Scarlet Sealing Wax — 20 Sticks to pound... 
1 doz. Boxes Fancy Perfumed Sealing Wax — Assorted 
Colors — 3 Sticks in box 

Goods retail for 

Complete weight of Assortment and Showcase 400 lbs 



Retail 


Goods 


Price, 


Retail 


Each 


for 


.20 


.20 


.10 


•30 


• 05 


.60 


•15 


•45 


.05 


.60 


.10 


1.20 


. .10 


1.20 


.10 


1.20 


• 25 


3-00 


.10 


.60 


.10 


.60 


.10 


.60 


• 25 


•75 


1-25 


1.25 


•75 


•75 


.40 


■46 


•2S 


•50 


•25 


•50 


.10 


1.20 


•35 


•35 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 


• 15 


•90 


.10 


.60 


•°5 


.60 


.10 


1.20 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 


.20 


.20 


.10 


1.20 


•05 


.60 


.20 


.80 


•05 


1. 00 


• 15 


1.80 




$45-55 



Thaddeus Davids Co. 



95-97 Van Dam Street, 



New York, U. S. A. 



Established 1825 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



ffl 
1 



H 



I 

i 



YOUR 
CASH 
REGISTER 




WILL 
RING 

OFTENER 



IF YOU USE 

"True Fruit" Syrups and Crushed Fruits 

EXCLUSIVELY 
AT YOUR FOUNTAIN 

The Reason Why.... 

Only the choicest, selected, fresh, ripe fruit is used in the making of these products. 
We try to make every package so superior in quality that it will compel your future pref- 
erence. 

Made by special cold process, under expert supervision, by experienced employees in the 
largest and most completely equipped factory of its kind in the world. 

There is no place where it is more important to Have Quality and to Talk Quality than 
at the Soda Fountain. 

It will give prestige and tone to your entire business. 

It will give your store the reputation of being high class and furnishing high grade goods. 
It is important enough to demand your attention and to compel your preference for "TRUE 
FRUIT" Syrups and Crushed Fruits, even if they cost a. little more, they are worth more. 
ASK YOUR JOBBER. 

J. HUNGERFORD SMITH CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

New York Office, 27 East 22d Street, M. J. Root Co. 

H. T. HAINTZ. Western Manager, Dwight Blag., Kansas City. Mo. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST wh/>u writing to Advertisers. 



6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



WINNERS-The following are the results of our~WINNERS 

^KSBH KUTftR Safety Razor 

Advertising and Selling Plan Contest 

which was open to all (exclusive) Retail Cutlery Dealers in the United States. 

Chicago, 111., Dec. 17, 1910. 

The Simmons Hardware Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Gentlemen: We, the judges, selected by you to go over the suggestions 
submitted by your dealers in the competition for a series of prizes 
offered by you for the best line of selling and advertising plans for 
KHH KU1HR Safety Razors, hereby make the following awards: 

We have gone over, individually and collectively, exhibits representing 
every contestant entered in this contest. It is our regret that we can- 
not award prizes to everyone on account of the interest, enthusiasm, and 
merit displayed, but our duties confine us to selecting the winner for 
the Grand Prize of $1,000.00 in gold, Twenty-five for prizes of $20.00 
Gold Pieces, and one hundred for the Roll of Honor. 

Below is the list. Respectfully, 

E. C. Patterson, Collier's Weekly 
Arthur Acheson, Saturday Evening Post 
Otto Haubold, Orange Judd Parmer 

The winner is C. A. Bcikcr, Hardware and General Merchandise Dealer of Mountain Home, Ark. 

(Baxter County) 

$1,000.00 in Gold 



who received 



The following Merchants and Clerks were each awarded 



$20.00 in Gold 



Winners of the 25 — $20.00 Gold Pieces 



NAME OF WINNER 
Alphabetically Arranged 



Edward D. Barnes, 
Clyde L. Barr, 
H. M. Bowman, 
James L. Case, 

Milton Cone, 

W. H. Davidson, 

G. E. Dole, 
W. H. Ellis, 
W. S. Hollis, 
M. T. Huber, 

O. B. James, 

Mandus A. jonson, 
Edward F. Kidder, 
R. D. Lane, 
Glenn C. Medaris, 
W. C. Moode, 
Edgar R. Moore, 
R. M. Pyburn, 
S. E. Rankin, 
Herbert M. Shadle, 

Herbert L. Smith, 
Marvin 0. Thomas, 
T. V. Terbush, 

H. B. Voorhees, 

Mix Yoeman, 



FIRM NAME 



P. F. Bubb, 
Barr & Sons, 
Weaver Hdw. Co., 
J. P. Richards, 

A. B. Clark & Son Hdw. Co. 

W. J. Davidson, 

J. N. Schmidt, 
Ellis Drug Co., 
J. C. Jones & Co., 
M. T. Huber, 

D. G. James, 
H. A. Olson, 

E. F. Kidder, 
R. D. Lane, 
Clinton Drug Co., 
W. F. Moode, 

R. T. Loundes, 
Wight-Pyburn Co., 
Rankin Bros., 
Ceres Drug Co., 

H. L. & W. B. Smith, 
Thomas' Pharmacy, 
Wilson & Schwendoner, 
H. B. Voorhees, Ph.G., 

Hamilton Hdw. Co., 



ADDRESS 



Leavenworth, Kans. 

Brush, Col. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

East Boston, Mass., drugs, 

353 Meridian St. 
Richmond, Va., 

121s E. Main St. 
Beaver Falls, Pa., 

1224-26 7th Ave. 
Hillsboro, Kans. 
Vandalia, Mb., drugs. 
Enid, Okla. 

St. Albans, Vt., drugs, 

72 N. Main St. 
Richland Center, Wis. 
Cambridge, Wis. 
Harmony, Minn., Box 87. 
Bradley, 111., drugs 
Clinton, Tenn., drugs 
What Cheer, la. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Roxton, Tex. 
Red Rock. Okla. 
Ceres, Cal., drugs 
Stanislaus Co. 
Jacksonville, 111- 
Bradentown, Fla., drugs 
Shattuck, Okla. 
Easton, Pa., drugs, 

9th & Washington Sts. 
Argenta, Ark. 



Although no Prizes were offered beyond 
the $1,000.00 in Gold for the ist Prize and 
$20.00 in Gold for the 25 next best plans 
submitted. 

In addition to the prizes in Gold, the 
judges selected to go on the Roll of Honor, 
names of contestants who sent in plans of 
such merit to warrant our awarding 100 ad- 
ditional prizes of $5.00 Gold Plated Keen 
Kutter Safety Razors, which we have sent 
to each contestant whose name appears on 
this Roll of Honor. 

Thanking our friends and customers for 
the interest shown in this contest, we are, 
Sincerely yours, 

SIMMONS HARDWARE COMPANY, 
St. Lonis, U. S. A. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



7 



"Here's What You Have Done Today!" 

The storekeeper who can say this to his clerks at the end of the day 
has solved his biggest business problem. He is getting his clerks to 
shoulder their share of responsibility for the success of his business 



OUR new National Cash Register has 
an adding wheel for each clerk 
showing how much business he does in the 
day. From these wheels and from the 
printed record furnished by the register the 
storekeeper can quickly tell each clerk at 
night how much business he has done in 
the day. He can enter the record in a 
book for prizes or promotion. He can give 
a prize for the largest amount of goods sold, 
and another prize for the largest number of 
customers waited on. One is as important 
as the other. 




Talking 
Over 
Today's Business 
Helps Tomorrow's 
Records. 



The National Cash Register way is the modern way of building business 



Bright Clerks Welcome 

This System 
/^LERKS want to get ahead 
— to earn more money. 
K each one sees that you 
have a way of comparing his 
record with other clerks, and 
of relieving him of the re- 
sponsibility for other people's 
mistakes, you get his best 
work. 

He soon develops real sales- 
manship in selling goods that 
the customer cannot see to ask 
for. 

He soon sees that politeness 
and attention to every cus- 
tomer, big or small, rich or 
poor helps his record and 
makes him more valuable. 
With this register each clerk 
stands on his own record. 



Meanwhile your trade grows 
— all of your customers get 
better service— your profits in- 
crease. 

Business Building 
Without Expense 

If you have four clerks and 
were able to increase each clerk's 
sales only $1 a day for the 
whole year, that would mean 
increased business of over $1,200 
a year. Isn't a plan that will do 
that worth investigating ? 

The National Cash Register 
is the only business system that 
gives this result in a practical 
way. 

More than 920,000 Nationals 
have been sold — We could not 
sell this great number unless they 
saved money and increased trade. 



What You Get With 
This National 

Separate adding wheels for each 
clerk up to nine clerks — each clerk 
has practically his own cash 
register. 

Total of all money taken in. 

Total of all " Charge " sales. 

Total of all money "Paid on 
Account" by customers. 

Total amount of money paid out. 

A printed record of each sale on 
a roll of paper inside the register. 

A printed check with each rec- 
ord — or the register can be built 
to print on a sales slip. 

Separate cash drawer for each 
clerk, up to nine clerks. 

With single cash drawer the 
register can be used with cashier. 

Can be operated by electricity. 

Built to stand on floor or counter. 

Does anything that any other 
register can do. 

Prices run from $290 to $765 
according to size. 



"It Pays 




The National Cash Register Co., Dayton, Ohio, nyad 

Send me information about National Cash Registers. This 
does not commit me to buy. 



Nat 



-Busi 



Address. 



.No. of Clerks. 



Ask us to send full information about this National 
Cash Register built to suit your business. Investigate 

today. You cannot begin to protect your 
profits any too soon. 



The National Cash Register Company, Dayton, Ohio 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



The Spanish Edition of the Pharmacopoeia 
of the United States of America 



At the second International Sanitary Convention of the American Republics, held at Wash- 
ington, D. C, October 12, 1905, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That a translation of this United States Pharmacopoeia into the 
Spanish language would prove of great benefit to the medical profession and 
pharmacists in each of the Republics represented in this convention. 

In compliance with this resolution the Board of Trustees have issued a translation of th« 
United States Pharmacopoeia, Eighth Decennial Revision, in the Spanish language, and this 
edition is now offered for sale at the following net prices, all forwarding charges included : 

Bound in Cloth $5.00 

Bound in Cloth, interleaved 6.00 

Bound in Sheep, 5.50 

Bound in Sheep, interleaved 6.50 

Bound in Flexible Leather 6.00 

As the United States of North America is rapidly becoming the center of educational ad- 
vantages for the people of Latin America who desire to perfect themselves in the medical and 
pharmaceutical sciences, and as our own commercial relations with Latin America are of grow- 
ing importance, it is the ambition of the American Druggist Publishing Co., Agents, to give ths 
first Spanish translation of our own standard Pharmacopceial work as widespread a dis- 
tribution as possible. The translation was made by Dr. Jose" Guillermo Diaz, Professor of 
Pharmacy in the University of Havana, Cuba, assisted by Dr, Placido Biosca, Professor 
of Physics in that University, and other distinguished teachers of pharmacy. 

The book is a volume of 766 pages, admirably printed and substantially bound. It repre- 
sents a vast amount of careful, expert work, and compares most favorably in all respects with 
pharmacopoeias of Continental Europe, and will form an exceedingly valuable work of reference. 
Five hundred and thirty pages are devoted to monographs on the various substances and com- 
pounds recognized, and 123 pages to an appendix containing lists of reagents, test solutions, 
indicators, volumetric solutions, instructions for making gasometric determinations, optical rota- 
tion and assays of alkaloidal drugs. The appendix also embraces a large number of tables, 
among which are tables of thermometric equivalents, saturation, of weights, measures and 
length, relation between weight and volume, and tables of strength of different densities of 
alcohol, ammonia and various acids. 

USE THE ATTACHED PRINTED FORM WHEN ORDERING 

To Facilitate Delivery, Payment in Full With Each Order Is Requested 



1910 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING CO., Agents, 
62-68 West Broadway, New York. 

Enclosed please find the sum of. Dollars, 

for which send to the following address, all charges _ paid, copy (or copies) 

of the Spanish Translation of the UNITED STATES PHARMACOPEIA, in 

binding. 

Name : 

Street Address. 

City. 

County and State 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



/ 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



We Lead; Others Try to Follow! 
H A ifn t n ■ i n i i 




Quality, De- 
sign and 
Workmanship 

are repre- 
sented in the 

Highest 
Degree by the 
"Strenuous" 
Outfit 



Call or write, and you'll wonder ^ ' ^ n^^P A^^^Lk fat^^afc Credit extended and ail fixtures 

" How we do It " for Mh^^ JC M ^^•^L^^^.^^ guaranteed 
All our outfits are READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY and are shipped complete, as shown in illustration 

SEGER & GROSS CO., 42 to 60 West 67th St., NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE 1041 COLUMBUS Originators and Makers of High Grade Druggists Fixtures at a price within the reach of all. 




CARPENTER'S Water-Proof Liquid Th < 



COURT PLASTER 



in Liquid 
Form 



Dealers please note Our Free Goods Offer, viz : 1 Dozen Free 
with each 6 dozen (on the 10c size only) stands as 
heretofore until further notice. 



ANTISEPTIC 

PREVENTS BLOOD 
POISONING 



CARPENTER'S 

WILL NOT 
WASH OFF 



PROTECTS AND HEALS 
CUTS. BURNS, 
ABRASIONS, ETC. 



10c, 25c and 50c sizes. Put up in convenient Collapsible Tubes. 



CARPENTER CHEMICAL COMPANY, 



48-54 STATE STREET, 



DETROIT, MICH 



Lion's 



We Give You tlie 




OF THE PROFIT 



Share 

We want all dealers in post cards to investigate our line, which consists of the largest line post cards of every description, comprising in 
general, Birthday and Greetings, Valentines, St. Patrick, Easter. Season Cards and Fancy Cards. Prices always the lowest 

SAMPLE LINE " A "—Consisting ol Birthdays. Greetings SAMPLE LINE "B" Consisting ol ValenUne. Easter. Wash- 
and Comic cards, to retail at le.— 2 lor 5c. and Sc. sellers. ington. and St. Patrick cards, lor the year 1911. to retail 
1000 cards lor $6.75. Express prepaid. at lc, 2 f or 5c. and 5c. each. 1000 cards S5.25. Exorass prapaltf. 

REMEMBER: "THE LION'S SHARE OF THE PROFIT FOR YOU 

J. BOUTON & CO., Inc., fo^Z^^s^r New York 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST xvlun writing to Advertisers. 



IO 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Buyers' Guide. 



If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supplied. 

For Alphabetical Index See Page 37. 



ALCOHOL 
Webb, James A. 



A Sona, New York. 



AKTrPHLOGIBTINE 

Dearer Chemical Co., New York. 

AMTLTOXIN 

Friteche Bros., New York. 
Mnlford k. Co., H. K„ Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Paatear Vaccine Co., Paris; Branch 

houses, New York and Chicago. 
Parke, Darts & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Scherlng A Glatz, New York. 
Stearns, Frederick, A Co., Detroit, 

inch. 

■chleffelln ft Co., New York. 



BEESWAX 

Leonard, Theo. 



Paterson, N. J. 



BOTTLE CAP! 

Win. A. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

■ozn 

Mt. Washington Box Co., Boston, 
Man. 

Read, 1. B., A Son, Baltimore, Md. 
•help, Henry H., A Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

10X18, TIX 

American Can Co., New York. 
American Stopper Co., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

BKUSHII 

Imperial Brush Factory. 
Hughes, Henry L., Chicago, 111. 

CANDIES, CHOCOLATE, ETC. 

Allegrettl Chocolate Cream Co., New 
York. 

Hnyler Chocolate Co., New York. 
Rnnkel Bros., New York. 



CAPSULES 

Merz Capsule Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Planten, H., & Son, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CASH REGISTER 
The National Cash Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio. 

CEMENT 

Major Mfg. Co.. New York. 

Russia Cement Co., Gloucester, Mass. 



CHEMICALS 



N. Y. 



St. 



Albany Chemical Co.. Albany 
Elmer & Amend, New York, 
Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
Fritzsche Bros., New York. 
Malllnckrodt Chemical Works, 

Louis, Mo., and New York. 
Merck & Co., New York. 
New York Quinine & Chemical Wks.. 

New York. 
Pasteur Vaccine Co.. Chicago. 
Parke. Davis A Co., Detroit. Mich. 
Powers A Weightman. Philadelphia. 

Pa. 

Schering & Glatz. New York. 
Scbieffelin A Co.. New York. 



National 

N. Y. 
New England 

Boston, Mass. 
Sen-Sen Chiclet Co.. 



CHEWING GUM 

Licorice Co., Brooklyn, 

Confectionery Co . 

New York. 

COLLAPSIBLE TUBES 

Wlrz. A. H.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

COLLEGES 

Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, 
N. Y. 

Buffalo College of Pharmacy. 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia. 
University of the State of New 

Jersey. 



CORKS 

Armstrong Cork Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Brauer, Justus, A Sons, Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Whltall Tatum Co.. New York. 
COURT PLASTER 

Chemical Co., Detroit. 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



Carpenter 

Mich. 
New-Skin Co. 



CRUDE DRUGS 
Allaire, Woodward A Co.. Peoria. 111. 

DRUGGIST COATS 
Welssfeld Brothers. New York. 

ELECTRIC SIGNS 
Art Sign Co,, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ray. S. E.. Mfg. Co., Danbury. Conn. 

Rotary Sign Co., New York. 

ESSENTIAL OILS AND FLAVOR- 
ING EXTRACTS 

Allen Stafford A Sons. London. E. C. 
Athanasslades Sons, J. B., New 

York. 

Wolmark Chemical Co., New York. 
Fries Bros., New York. 
Fritzsche Bros., New York. 
Dngerer A Co.. New York. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

American Druggist Fire Ins., Co., 

Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Druggist Indemnity Exchange, St. 

Louis. 

FIXTURES AND FURNITURE 
Revell. A. H.. A Co., Chicago. III. 
Seger ft Gross Co., New York. 

FOUNTAIN PENS 

Waterman Pen Co., New York. 
Royal Specialty Co., New York. 

GASTRIC JUICE 

Laboratories of Applied Physiology 
of France, New York. 



GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES 
Elmer A Amend. New York. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York 
Hygeia Nursing Bottle Co., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

GRAPE JUICE 
Welch Grape Juice Co.. Wettfleld. 
N. Y. 

HARMONICAS 
Hohner, M., New York. 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

INFANTS' FOOD 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co.. New 

York. 

Horlick's Malted Milk Co.. Raclae 
Wis. 

Smith. Kline A French. Philadelphia 
Pa. 

Mellin's Food Co.. Boston. Mass. 
INKS 

Davids Co., Thaddeus, New York. 

LABELS 
Read. E. B.. A Son. Baltimore. 
Mott Label Co.. W. A., Norwalk, 

Conn. 



MACHINERY 
Colton, Arthur. 

Mich. 
Wirz, A. 



ETC. 

Company. Detroit. 
H.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
MALTED MILK 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co.. New 

Malted Milk Co.. Racine. 



York 
Horlick's 
Wis. 



MINERAL WATERS 
Garrod Spa Lltbla Water Co.. St- 

Louis. 

NEBULIZERS 
Becton-Dickinson A Co., New York. 
PASTEURIZERS 

The Thermoton Co., New York, 



"DOUGHERTY'S PLAYING CARDS" THE STANDARD f^rilkaMii!!!^ 



NQI30- 



PLAYING. CARDS - 



A. DOUGHERTY 

76-78-80 CENTRE ST. 
NEW YORK 



(TRADE MARK) 



No. 130 MARGUERITES 

FRENCH OR WHIST SIZE 
LINEN STOCK 
HIGHLY ENAMELED OR LINOIO FINISH 
GOLD EDGES TELESCOPE CASES 

Following: Back Designs Printed in Colors and Gold 

APPLE BLOSSOM IRIS THISTLE 
CLOVER ROSE TULIP 

SOMETHING NEW 

A perfumed card with floral back designs. 
A coupon with each pack. For six 
coupons we send a 50c. sachet 
or lingerie hag free. 



NEW DISPLAY CARTON 



A. DOUGHERTY - New York, N. Y. 



No. 130 Marguerite 



No. 130 Marguerite 



No. 130 M 






CLOVER 
Back No. 1301 



ROSE 
Back No. 1302 



THISTLE 
Back No. 1303 




APPLE BLOSSOM 
Back No. 1301 



TWO 
PACKS 
IN A 
BOX 

THREE 
BOXES 
(6 packs) 

IN A 
DISPLAY 
CARTON 



No. 130 Marguerite 




TT'LIP 

Back No. 1301? 



THE 25c FjA.VO*R.IT > I!s*S No ? 



io. 8 D. "THE SNAPPIEST CARD MADE" 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



1 1 



Buyers' Guide.-c° ntinued - 

If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supplied. 



PHARMACEUTICAL AND PRO- 
PRIETARY PREPARATIONS 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co.. Chicago, 111. 
Allaire, Woodward & Co.. Peoria, 111. 
Ammonol Chemical Co.. New York. 
Anglo-American Drug Co., New York. 
Antlkamnla Chem. Co.. St. Louis. Mo. 
Bauer Chemical Co., New York. 
Breltenbach. M. J., Co.. New York. 
Bristol-Myers Co.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Barroaghs, Wellcome & Co.. London. 

Centaur Co.. New York. 
Chattanooga Med. Co., Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

The Cudahy Packing Co., Sontb 
Omaha, Neb. 

Dearer Chemical Co., New York. 
Doane, Chas. K., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dreret ,Mfg. Co.. New York. 

Ell Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Brans Chemical Co., Cincinnati. 0. 
Falrcblld Bros. & Foster. New York. 
Fellows Medical Mfg. Co., Ltd.. New 
York. 

Fries Bros., New York. 
Frltzsche Bros.. New York. 
Hoffman, Geo. W.. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hoffman-La Roche Chemical Works, 

New York. 
Lambert Pbarm. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
McAvoy Brewing Co.. Chicago, 111. 
Merck & Co. 

Mulford Co., H. K., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Oakland Chemical Co.. New York. 



Pabst Extract Co.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

PersonenI, J., New York. 

Plnex Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Planten, H., & Sons, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Schleffelln Sc Co., New York. 

Scott & Bowne, Bloomfleld, N. J. 

Sharp & Dohme, New York. 

Smith, J. P., New York. 

Smith. Kline & French Co.. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Smith, Martin H., Co., New York. 

Swanson's Rheumatic Cure Co., Chi- 
cago, III. 

Sylvester's Haarlem OU. New York. 
Wampole St, Co.. Henry K.. Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

Wells, Richardson Co.. Burlington, 
Vt. 

Wyeth. Jno., & Bro., Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Young. W. F., Springfield. Mass. 

PINEAPPLE JUICE 

Dole's Pure Hawaiian, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

PLAYING CARDS 

American Bank Note Co., New York. 
Dougherty, A., New York. 

POSTAL CARDS (SOUVENIR) 
Albertype Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
American News Co., New York. 
Bouton & Co., Inc., J., New York. 
Kropp. E. C. Co.. Milwaukee WU 
National Color Type Co., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

RAZORS 

Simmons Hardware Co.. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 



RUBBER GOODS 

Davol Rubber Co, Providence, B. I. 
Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

SCALES 

Torsion Balance Co.. New York. 

SHOW CASES 

Detroit Show Case Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Revell, A. H., & Co., Chicago, 111. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 

Becker Co., L. A., Chicago, 111. 
Green & Sons, Robt. M., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Liquid Carbonic Co., Chicago. 
Loeber Co.. Henry G.. New York. 

SODA FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES 

American Chem. Co. 

Hawaiian Pineapple Products Co., 
Ltd., San Francisco, Cal. 

Mosteller Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

Smith, J. Hungerford, Co., Roches- 
ter. N. Y. 

Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

Doering & Son Co., Chicago, 111. 

SPICE MILLS 
Allaire. Woodward & Co.. Peoria. 111. 

STATIONERY, ETC. 
American News Co., New York. 

STERILIZERS 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

STOPPERS, SPRINKLER TOPS. 
ETC. 

Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 
Wlrz, A. H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



SUPPOSITORIES 
Schleffelln & Co.. New York. 

SYRINGES 

The Marvel Co., New York. 
Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

SYRINGE BOXES 

Sheip. Henry, & Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

THERMOMETERS 

Becton, Dickinson Co., New York. 
Kessling, E., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

TOILET SPECIALTIES 

Graham, Mrs. Gervaise, Chicago, 111. 
Hall & Ruckel. New York. 
Hudson & Co.. New York. 
Hydrox Chemical Co., New York. 
Ingram Co., F. F., Detroit, Mich. 
Kress & Owen Co., New York. 
Lambert Phar. Co.. St. Louis, Mo. 
Loreley-Duplex Mfg. Co., New York. 
Resinol Co.. Baltimore. Md. 

VACCINES 

Pasteur Vaccine Co.. Paris; branches 
New York and Chicago. 

VACCINE VIRUS 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit. Mich. 
Pasteur Vaccine Co., Paris; branches 

New York and Ch'cago. 
Stearns. Frederick. St Co., Detroit. 

Mlcb. 

Mulford, H. K.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



DRUGGISTS CARPINE 



are often asked for an antiseptic 
MOUTH WASH that they can guar- 
antee is FREE FROM ACID. Such 
a preparation is 

LYTHOL 

Serial No. 2508 
Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30th, 

1906 

It preserves the teeth by preventing 
decay. Allays inflammation and ca- 
tarrhal conditions of the mucous 
membranes of the Eye, Nose, Mouth 
and Throat. Relieves Sore Throat 
and Hoarseness. 



NAPTHO-SULPHUR CREAM 

is now being advertised extensively 
and persistently to the medical profes- 
sion as a local application in all forms 
of skin affections. 

Druggists should see that a suffi- 
cient quantity is kept in stock, in order 
to meet the demand that must accrue 
from this constant advertising. 

Being composed of beta-napthoi 
and sulphur — two of the most power- 
ful parasiticides — you can recommend 
it with enthusiasm in all diseases of 
both scalp and skin. 

Car pine Naptho-Sulphur Cream 
can be secured through the jobbing 
trade, generally 



FOR SALE BY ALL JOBBERS 

....OR.... 

HUDSON & COMPANY, Inc., Manufacturing Chemisls, 149-151 West 36lh Street, NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



12 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Be able to Fill Orders for 

PIN EX 

the Big Selling Cough Remedy 

This remedy was designed by a pharmaceutical 
chemist to take the place of a thousand and one 
home-made remedies used by housewives to cure 
coughs. 

People that used to come to the druggist for five 
cents' worth of glycerine and a nickel's worth of 
Horehound tea, licorice, or something else, are now 
buying 50 cents' worth of Pinex. 

They get a better remedy and they pay the drug- 
gist a better profit. 

Pinex has created a lot of brand new, profitable 
cough medicine sales to a class of people who 
would not buy an ordinary cough syrup. 

If you're not selling it you should. We guaran- 
tee the sale. Unsold bottles returnable at any 
time. 

Any jobber will supply you. $4 per dozen. Re- 
tails at 50c the bottle. 

The Pinex Co. Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



MR. DRUGGIST! WHY NOT PUSH THAT 
GOOD PREPARATION OF YOURS ? 

Our Experts write bright, readable copy for Books, 
Leaflets and Folders that sell the goods. 

Just send a copy of label and particulars, and get a 
quotation. 

WE KNOW HOW! 

SCRIPTOR, 2203 Orem Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 




"Every Coat We turn out a Winner" 

Druggists and Dispensers Coats 

aj Your personal appearance will be improved by 
wearing our made to measure coata, thoroughly 
shrunk. We have a large variety of styles and 
strictly washable materials. Cut shows style No. 5 
made from any material desired. 
tj Write for our swatch card showing styles, ma- 
terials, and prices, free upon request. We can fit 
you properly by mail. Free delivery to all parts 
of the world. 

WEISSFELD BROTHERS 
1 1 7 Nassau Street :: :: :: NEW YORK 



JVIad axn. Dean's Antiseptic 
Vaginal Suppositories 



A PERFECTLY RELIABLE VAGINAL ANTISEPTIC 
Price $3.30 per dozen. Retails at 50c. per 

Sold by all Jobbers or order direct from 



<e m tails at 50 c. per Box ■ 



the united medical co., inc. 

P.O.Box No. 74-. Send for Free Sam pies. LANCASTER ,PA . 




SELL A BOTTLE OF 

ABSORBINE FOR $2.00 

mnd make 50c profit rather than sell the cheaper 
article with its 6 or jc profit. It requires no 
more time, paper or twine, but it does greatly 
increase your volume of business and annual 
profits. And in addition you have a satisfied 
customer who will buy ABSORBINE and other 
things from you year after year. 

ABSORBINE is constantly advertised in the 
prominent farm, stock and horse papers, and 
horse-owners everywhere are demanding AB- 
SORBINE. Are 70U getting your share of this 
business? Inquiries received at this office are 
referred to nearest druggist carrying the remedy 
in stock. Have *ou reported? 

ABSORBINE is a mild, antiseptic, resolvent 
and discutient liniment for removing Bursal 
Enlargements, Bog Spavins, Thoroughpins. 
Puffs, Shoe Boils, Capped Hocks; healing cuts 
and bruises; curing strains, or sprains; stops 
lameness and allays pain. Does not blister or 
remove the hair and horse can be used. 

ABSORBINE JR. is ABSORBINE prepared 
for mankind and is a trustworthy household 
liniment. It has met with great success in re- 
ducing VARICOSE VEINS, VARICOCELE. 
GOITRE, ENLARGED GLANDS; healing ul- 
cers, wounds, sores; takes out soreness and in- 
flammation, allays pain. Put up in two sizes 
retailing at $1.00 4-oz. bottle and $2.00 ia-oz. 
bottle. 

Imprinted pamphlets if you want them. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

49 Temple Street Springfield, Mass. 



* •(Beg.W.S.%P»t01t.) \ w yM 

is the one and only absolutely uniform 
and unalterable solution of iron and 
manganese in the form of true organic 
peptonates. It is also the one and 
only preparation lawfully entitled to 
be known as "Pepto-Mangan," a valid 
trademark, which is our exclusive 
property. We respectfully request the 
trade to take due notice of these facts. 

M. J. Breitenbach Co., New YorK, u. s. a. 



"THAT'S WHAT THEY ALL SAY" 

Perfumes made from Wolmark Concrete Flower Oils last longer, and 
cost half. Try them. 

Make a good perfume, and save 100 per cent. 
Make a good Customer by selling a better Perfume. 
Let it be something new for your trade. 
Let it be your exclusive make. 

Our odors suit the most delicate taste. Write for our new price list 
and Formula? book. Select your odors. We recommend the following: 
Violet de Parme....@ $2.25 per oz. Corylupsis du Japan® 2.00 per oz. 

Dear Kiss Fleurie. ,@ 2.25 per oz. Honey Suckle @$i.75peroz. 

Lilac Swiss @ 1.25 per oz. 

And one hundred and two other Oils listed. Soon you will use Otto 
of Rose Synthetic W. C. C. The sooner the better. This Otto is 
stronger than the Natural. To give finish to your toilet Preparations, 
use "WOLMARK'S SYNTHETICS." 

WOLMARK CHEMICAL CO. Formerly Flora Chemical Co. 
113 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



13 



W 191 l^M 

KNTIKftMNIg CALENDAR 

Druggists and Drug Clerks Attention! 




Please send us a 
list of your friends 
and customers and 
we will mail each 
a copy of our 1911 
Antikamnia Cal- 
endar, FREE, on 
January 1st, with 
YOUR compliments 



DO IT TODAY 

REMEMBER! 

Firstcome.first served 



Write names and 
addresses plainly 



fflC -SIMILE-- -REDUCED 



Antikamnia Tablets 

and 

Antikamnia & Codeine 
Tablets 

Will certainly re- 
lieve pain and you 
can safely recom- 
mend them ! 



THE ANTIKAMNIA CHEMICAL CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO., U.S.A. 



POPULAR FOR GENERATIONS 



Planten's e J;~ |C 

C&Cor Black 

^ 61 CAPSULES 



(Registered in United States Patent Office) 
THE FORMULA OF OUR LA TE MR. H. PLANTEN 
ON OF THE OLDEST AND BEST REMEDIES FOR 

Chronic and Acute Gonorrhoea, Gleet 

■^Beware of "NEAR GOODS," 
NEAR NAMES" and other imitations 



THERE IS NOTHING 

"JUST AS GOOD" 

H. PLANTEN & SON 

ESTABLISHED 1S36 

93 HENRY STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

"The Pioneer American Capsule House" 



MAJOR'S CEMENT THE STRONGEST ON EARTH 




Major's Rubber and Leather Cement is the same price at 
RETAIL: ig cents per bottle. At all jobbers. Liberal dis- 
counts. 

Write for our attractive offer and display stands. 

MAJOR MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

A. MAJOR, President, 
461 Pearl Street, New York City. 




-PHARMACY-STUDENTS- 
-PURCHASE-THE- BEST- 

Answers to Questions 
prescribed by Phar- 
maceutical State 
Boards. 8vo. 303 pp. 
Price $ 1 .50 net. 

JOHN JOS. McVEY 
Publisher Philadelphia, Pa. 



GASTROGEN 
TABLETS 

A Neutralizing Digestive 
$4.00 per dozen 
Throng* Jobbers. 

BRISTOL-MYERS CO. 

277*281 Greene Are. 
Brooklyn-New York.U.S.A. 




TABLETS 



ANrjtrauzingDigestivc 

INDICATED IN VARIOUS* 
FORMS OF 
.INDIGESTION 



BRISTOL-MYERS Co 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



i 



14 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



W. T. CO. VASELINE ATOMIZERS 

br Melting and Spraying Vaseline and Similar Ointments, and Atomizing Medicinal Oils. 
Of Superior Material and the Best Workmanship and Finish. 

IX. The glass bottles in all our Vaseline Atomizers are specially annealed to stand 

/ \ changes in temperature, so that medicated vaseline or heavy oil can be melted in them, 
either over a flame or in hot water, and applied to the nose and throat in a fine volumin- 

^ WS&k ous spray. 

- jL J The bulbs are of best quality rubber, elastic and durable. The valve is seated in a 

neck, and cannot work loose. 

All metal parts are substantially nickel-plated. The curved liquid tube will take up the contents of the bottle almost 
to the last drop. 

Each In box. 1/4 dozen In package. 

With Detachable Throat and Nasal Tubes of Metal. 
No. 30 $10.00 Per dozen 

DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE 40% IN PACKAGE LOTS 40.10% 

For full line of ATOMIZERS see pages 104 to 111 Inclusive of our 1911 catalogue 

WHITALL TATUM COMRAIMY 




HEW YORK 
46 and 48 Barclay St 



BOSTON 
91 Washington St., North 

A full line of samples of our goods can be seen at our sample rooms, Nos. 120-122 Franklin St., Chicago. 



PHILADELPHIA 
410-416 Race St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
576 Mission St. 



SYDNEY, N. S. W. 
10 Barrack St. 



CHEMICALS 

MEDICINAL TECHNICAL 

P-W-R 

POTASSIUM IODIDE 

Crystals or Granular 

BISMUTH SUBNITRATE 

White, Bulky, Tasteless 



Specify P-W-R Original Packages 



Complete List on Request 



Powers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co. 



NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



ST. LOUIS 



HTHE advertiser who 
gets his offering 
into the right kind of 
stores secures results. 
That is the reason old 
advertisers stay in the 
American Druggist 
and new ones constantly 
use our columns: they 
have found that the 
American Druggist 
goes into the stores 
of buyers. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



i5 





BE 6URETH18 NAME IN 
RED IS ON THE LABEL, 




une Hawaiianlineapple Juice 



A Wonderful, New, Healthful All-the - Year- 
Round Drink. Physicians prescribe it in throat, 
stomach and intestinal troubles. A refreshing drink 
during fever convalescence. Druggists, Grocers and 
Soda Fountains supplied by any wholesale Drug- 
gist or Grocer. If you can't get Dole's write us. 
Booklet for the asking. 

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE PRODUCTS CO., Ltd. 
112 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 



THE ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY— UNION UNIVERSITY. 

Or&anlzad tn 1881. 

Graded course of instruction, comprising two terms of seven months each. Fees: $80.00 per term. Write for our catalogue 
Riving full information. Address 

THEODORE J. BRADLEY, Ph. G., Secretary, Albany, N. Y. 



Allen's Croton Oil 



THE BEST IS 
THE BEST FOR YOU! 

is the Best, and Keeps Indefinitely, because it is expressed Cold. 

You Know that — PURITY+COLOR+STABLE QUALITYTHERAPEUTIC 
VALUE in Croton Oil — Allen's possesses those qualities in the Highest Degree — 
that's why it's the Standard in England, where the requirements are most strict. 

Allen's Croton Oil is Well Advertised and in Constant Demand 

Be sure to SPECIFY ALLEN'S. Prepared only by 

STAFFORD ALLEN & SONS, Ltd. 

LONDON, ENGLAND 



Chicago, 22 Filth Ave. 

Philadelphia, 514 Arch St. 

San Francisco, 244 California St. 



Est. 1833. 



NEW YORK 
UNGERER & COMPANY 
273 PEARL STREET 




MILES PLAN 

Has made the Retail Druggists Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars in Profits 

DID YOU BET YOUR SHARE? 

Price Protection 

Is after all the only live issue — the one that gives point to the druggists' motto: 

"Live and Let Live " 



The co-operation of the Druggist is especially due to those who help him 
THE DR. MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart, ind. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



i6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



INSULATION counts most in an 

ICE CREAM CABINET 

ARCTIC STEEL ICE CREAM CABINETS 

are insulated with 2- PURE CORK. 
Entirely constructed of Non-Rustable Steel. 
Use less ice than any other cabinet. Do 
not leak, swell or waterlog. All sizes. 

A catalogue for the asking. 

C. DOERING & SON 

LAKE and SHELDON SXS. CHICAGO, ILL. 




Sylvester's 
Haarlem Oil 



For 200 Years 

the standard remedy of the 
world for 
KIDNEY DISEASES, BLADDER 
TROUBLE, OR AVEL 
and all 
INWARD INFLAMMATION. 



WE ARE EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 

For the U. S. and Canada for the importation of 

Genuine Sylvester's Haarlem Oil 

From Haarlem, Holland 
Nene Other If Genuine. Look for "C, SYLVESTER " on the label 

M. COWARD ( 

SUCCESSOR TO C. SYLVESTER 

Dtpot, No. 270 Greenwich Street, New York 



5,000E$1. 



00 




WILL NOT CURL. IN ROLL FORM ^ 

SIZE 1x2 INCH 

PRINTED AND PLAIN 

GUMMED TAPES. ALL SIZES. 

RAPID PACKAGE SEALING AND 
TAPE MOISTENING MACHINES. 
FROM Sl.OO TO $10.00 

W. A. MOTT LABEL CO. : Norwalk, Conn. 



TO THE PUBLIC: 

Answering many inquiries from physicians 
and druggists we desire to say: 

SALVAR is a liquid compounded in one bot- 
tle containing a full course treatment of 35 to 
40 days' duration; it is not put up in the form 
of a powder; the name is blown in the bottle, 
embossed on a metal top ; series letter and pro- 
gressive number on' engraved label, and a cor- 
rect account kept of the sale of each bottle ; 
where it is shipped, and the disease it is intend- 
ed to be used for. 

We shall prosecute counterfeiters and imita- 
tors. 

SALVAR was tested for two years before a 
bottle was sold or a penny of any man's money 
taken. It has been on the market seven years. 
We probably can refer to any person who has 
ever made use of it, or to the many physicians 
who are now using it in their practice. 

Dun's Bradstreet's, or any bank will give 
our financial and commercial rating. 

Very respectfully, 

SALVAR MEDICINE COMPANY, 

St. Louis, Mo. 



Hotel Lenox 



BUFFALO. N. Y. 




1! I! > 



HIGHEST GRADE FIREPROOF 
Ideal hotel (or visitors to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Points on the 
Great Lakes and Canadian Resorts. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

$1.50 per day and up 
ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT PRICES 

Patrons may take Taxicabs or Carriages from Depot* or 
Wharves direct to hotel, charging same to The Lenox 

When in Buffalo stop at THE LENOX. The accommodations 
and service are sure to please. 

C. A. MINER, Manager 



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AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



17 



A. H. WIRZ 



WHITE METAL GOODS 

913-915-917 Cherry Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Bottle Stoppers 

Tin Spouts for Bug 
Poisons 

Collapsible Tubes 



METAL SYRINGES 

Hand Pill Machines 

Moulds for 
Suppositories 

Collapsing 
Drinking Cups 






Flaxseed was the leading poultice 
material of olden times. 




Trade Mark 

has not only superseded flaxseed poultices, but is 
used in many conditions where the poultice, being 
septic, was positively detrimental. 

In order not to lose profitable sales, be sure 
your stock of Antiphlogistine is adequate. 

Prices. 

Small per doz. $4.00 

Medium . " " 6.00 

Large " " 10.00 

Hospital " " 20.00 

Five percent, discount from list from jobbers on 
$24.00 orders. 

THE DENVER CHEMICAL MFG. CO. 

IM E W YORK 




"REVELL No. 300" 

Sectional Outfit 

Made in Oak and Birch 



WRITE US TO-DAY FOR 
DESCRIPTION AND PRICES 



Alexander B. Revel! & Co. 

Rees and Dayton Streets 
CHICAGO, ILL* 



Mr. Dealer— 2,500,000 women will read about the E BURNHAM TOILET PREPARA- 
TIONS, in our MID-WINTER advertising campaign in the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL— 
BUTTERICK — STANDARD —NEW IDEA AND PICTORIAL REVIEW— FASHION 
QUARTERLIES— and in DRESS AND VOGUE. 

FOR THREE MONTHS THESE QUARTERLIES WILL BE A CONSTANT 
SOURCE OF REFERENCE FOR THE BUYING WOMAN. Are you in a position to get 
your share of the business? Write to-day for our helps and order blank, and take advantage 
of our offer of FREE goods. 

$5.00 worth of FREE goods, of your own selection, with a $50.00 net order, or $2.50 FREE 
goods with a $25.00 net order, providing your order is placed before Feb. 15th, igu. Send your 
order to-day, for shipment any time before Feb. 15th. 
Terms 10% less list prices, 2% cash, — 60 days net. 

N'Ote — We have a beautiful Decalcomania Transfer -window sign, 15x12 in., showing three 
preparations in colors, and reads, "We sell E. Burnham'3 Toilet Preparations," which 
will be sent upon request, and agreement to place the sign either on your window or 
showcase. 

E. BURNHAM, 67 and 69 E. Washington Street, Chicago, Dept. C 119 




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i8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



ES 




Diphtheria Antitoxin 



For the treatment and prevention of 
Diphtheria 

Tetanus Antitoxin 

For the treatment and prevention of Tet- 
anus (Lockjaw) 

Tuberculin 

For diagnosis and treatment of Tuberculosis 

Neisser-Bacterin 

(CONOCOCCIC VACCINE) 

For diagnosis of obscure cases of Arthritis and 
treatment of Gonorrheal Infections 

S taphy lo-Bacter i n 

(STAPHYLOCOCCIC VACCINE) 

For treatment of Acne, Furunculosis and 
Staphylococcic Infections 




Literature and Working Bulletins mailed upon request 



5 



H.K MULFORD COMPANY, 



5> 



CHEMISTS 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO MINNEAPOLIS KANSAS CITY 

ATLANTA SEATTLE TORONTO 



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t^ bs 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST 

and PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



PHILADELPHIA 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 9, 1911. 



CHICAGO 



ISSUED SEMI-MONTHLY BY 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING CO. 

NEW YORK, 62-68 West Broadway. 

A. R. ELLIOTT President. 

CASWELL A. MAYO, Ph.G Editor. 

THOMAS J. KEENAN Associate Editor. 

Yearly Subscription Rates, Including Postage: 
United States, Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines. $1.50 

Canada 2.00 

Great Britain 12s. 6d. 

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ADVERTISING RATES QUOTED ON APPLICATION. 

The American Druggist and Pharmaceuticall Record is issued on 
the second and fourth Mondays of each month. Changes of advertise- 
ments should be received ten days in advance of the date of publication. 

Remittances should be made by New York Exchange, post omce or 
express money order or registered mail. If checks on local banks are 
used 10 cents should be added to cover cost of collection. The publishers 
are not responsible for money sent by unregistered mail, nor for any 
money paid except to duly authorized agents. All communications should 
be addressed and all remittances made payable to American Druggist 
Publishing Company, 62-68 West Broadway, New York. 

Entered at New York as Second Class Matter. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorial Comment: 

Whiskey on Prescription, The Foster Bill 19 

The Danger of Enthusiasm, The Need of Uniformity in Laws, 
To Test the Pennsylvania Labeling Regulations, The Drugless 

Drug Store 20 

Precautions to Be Observed in Preparing "606." Allowances for 

Returned Bottles, Pharmaceutical Endowments 21 

Singular Muddle in German Law 22 

Original Articles: 

Chemotherapy and 60S, by Joseph L. Turner; The Pharmacists 
of Napoleon's Armies, by F. Ashford White; Note on a New 
Form of Belladonna Adulteration, by Charles E. Vanderkleed; 

The Telephone in the Drug Store, by Wilhelm Bodemann 23-29 

Abstracts and Translations: 

Suspensions and Solutions of Salvarsan, Drug Stains and Their 
Removal, The Treatment of Pormanate Poisoning, Ambergris, 

An Apparatus for Keeping Lime Water 26-30 

Notes, Queries and Answers: 

Liniment for Animals. Physicians' Prescriptions and the Phar- 
macy Law, India Rubber Cement. "German Salve" and "Dutch 
Butter," That Emulsion Formula, Label Paste, Recipes for 
Massage Creams, Glass Cleanser and Polisher, Blount's Oil of 
Tar, The Action of the Saline Purgatives, A Non-Greasy Anti- 
septic Ointment, The Alkaloid Distribution and Formation in 
the Opium Poppy, Tests for Atoxyl, Papaverine and Cryptopine, 
Grindelia Robusta, The Odor of Morphine Salts, Applications 
for Toothache, The Excretion of Drugs, The Acidity of Hy- 
drogen Dioxide Solutions 31-33 

Letters to the Editor: 

Standards for Unofficial Drugs, by George M. Beringer 33 

Advertising — Business — Accounting: 

Miscellaneous Winter Ads, by Frank Farrington; Borrowing from 

the Bank, by Frank E. Goodwin 34-39 

News of the Drug World 40-51 

Review of the Wholesale Drug and Chemical Market 52-53 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

The proposition that licensed pharmacists 
Whiskey on . may not compound and sell preparations 
Prescription containing whiskey as an ingredient, except 

they are holders of a liquor license, has 
been put forth from time to time by interested parties, and an 
ex-policeman who sought to be revenged on a druggist in Brook- 
lyn has learned to his cost that the courts will not sustain any 
contention of this kind. We report the case in our news columns, 
but may restate it briefly here for the benefit of our 'eaders. The 



druggist in question had actively opposed the granting of a 
license to the ex-policeman for a liquor saloon which In- pro- 
posed to open near his premises, going so far, indeed, as to cir- 
culate a petition among the residents of the neighborhood. As 
a consequence, the license was refused, and the revenge taken 
by the former officer took the form of charging the druggist 
with the illegal sale of whiskey, but, as subsequent events prov d, 
he had overreached himself; for, in preparing a prescription in 
which whiskey figured as the principal ingredient, he included 
medicines such as strychnine, which are sometimes prescribed 
with whiskey in a legitimate manner by physicians. The magis- 
trate who heard the case decided that the druggist was perfectly 
within his rights in dispensing a prescription of the kind in 
question. It is so much the custom nowadays for lawyers and 
others to seek to interfere with the rights and privileges of 
pharmacists that the state enactment pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of pharmacy is sometimes overlooked. After 
all the arduous preparation a pharmacist has to undergo before 
he is licensed by the state to sell poisons and dispense physi- 
cians' prescriptions, it would be an especial hardship if he should 
be subjected to possible persecution for the legitimate practice 
of his profession. 



Many of our readers will be surprised to 
The Foster learn, through the report of the preliminary 
Bill hearing on the Foster bill, which appears in 

our news columns, that the representative of 
the National Association of Retail Druggists appeared at this 
hearing in behalf of the measure. Concerning the object aimed 
at by the bill there can be no difference of opinion. Every repu- 
table pharmacist will welcome any practicable regulations which 
will prevent the abuse of narcotic drugs. We are convinced that 
the Foster bill will not do this and is not practicable. Several 
intelligent pharmacists have given their approval to the measure, 
but we cannot believe that in doing so they fully realize the trou- 
ble, the time and the expense which its enforcement would entail 
on the retail druggist. Under the law every dealer would be re- 
quired to give bond. No bonding company will furnish such a 
bond for much less than $7 or $8 a year. Strict account must 
be kept of all sales of preparations containing any of the 
narcotic drugs named in the law. The law makes no distinction 
as to the degree of dilution. It is possible that the regulations 
might, but if they do the legality of such a regulation is ques- 
tionable. The law requires that a stamp shall be affixed to each 
package of any preparation of the drugs named when sold. This 
would mean that on every five cents worth of brown mixture tab- 
lets, paregoric or Sun cholera mixture a stamp would have to 
appear, while a record would have to be made of each indi- 
vidual sale. These regulations apply to proprietary preparations 
also, and the minimum punishment for an infraction of the law 
is $400 or imprisonment for three months. It seems impossible 
that any retail druggist can seriously advocate such a measure. 



20 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



This measure was drafted by Hamilton 
The Danger of Wright, who represented the United States 
Enthusiasm as a member of the International Opium 

Commission. As a member of that com- 
mission he no doubt feels under obligations to secure some sort 
of antinarcotic legislation as an evidence of the sincerity of the 
United States in its protestations against the evils of the drug 
habit. The commission meets again in May of this year at The 
Hague, and no doubt Mr. Wright would be much pleased to lay 
before his colleagues a stringent antinarcotic law as evidence of 
his activity in the United States. But the pharmacists of the 
country must not permit trie enthusiasm of Mr. Wright and other 
reformers to lead to the enactment of a measure so full of ob- 
jections from a practical point of view as is the Foster bill. A 
further hearing is to be granted by the Committee of Ways and 
Means in Washington on Wednesday, January n, and we un- 
derstand that a number of delegates from various organizations 
of druggists will appear in opposition to the measure in its pres- 
ent form. In our news columns we report the results of an im- 
portant conference between Mr. Wright and some of the whole- 
sale druggists of New York, held in this city last week. It is 
to be hoped that the representations made at this conference and 
those which may be made at the hearing on Wednesday will re- 
sult in a material modification of the bill, particularly in so far 
as it affects the retail druggist. 



The difficulties involved in an ef- 
The Need for f° rt to meet the requirements 

Uniformity in Laws of different laws in different 

states are from the manufactur- 
ers' point of view almost insurmountable. The manufacturer 
cannot tell what particular state any individual package will 
eventually reach. Many of the larger manufacturers send out 
goods to every state in the Union, these goods reaching the re- 
tailer through the jobber. Many of the larger jobbing houses, 
and in fact practically all have trade in more than one state. 
Goods sent to any one jobber would therefore have to comprise 
an assortment of labels to suit the requirements of every state 
in which he did business. It will be seen that the complications 
involved in an effort to meet varying requirements in the differ- 
ent states would be a very serious handicap on trade, and without 
any compensating advantage to the consuming public. An effort 
has been made to bring about uniformity in drug and food legisla- 
tion throughout the United States by enacting state laws which 
conform in general characteristics to the national food and drugs 
act. In some states the laws even specifically adopt such regula- 
tions as may be framed by the United States authorities. In 
the state of Pennsylvania, however, the regulations provided for 
the enforcement of the food and drugs act by the Pennsylvania 
Board of Pharmaceutical Examiners differ from those of the 
United States government. The state law permits variation 
from the standards of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the 
National Formulary. But the board takes the ground that the 
mere specification on the label of the strength of the preparation 
does not constitute sufficient notice that the preparation varies 
from the standards laid down by the authorities mentioned. The 
board, therefore, lays down the requirement that any preparation 
bearing a name recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia, 
the National Formulary or the American Homoeopathic Pharma- 



copoeia which differ in strength, purity or quality from the stand- 
ards laid down in those works must bear on its label the words 
"not of official strength of United States Pharmacopoeia or Na- 
tional Formulary or American Homoeopathic Pharmacopoeia." 
It is a question whether the board in making this requirement 
has not transcended its authority. The manufacturers of phar- 
maceuticals hold that the regulation is in effect new legislation 
and that it is not within the province of an executive board to 
make a regulation which is practically a new law. 



In view of the difference of 
To Test the Pennsylvania opinion on this point of law 
Labeling Regulations between the Pennsylva- 
nia board and the manufac- 
turing pharmacists, it has been arranged to take the matter into 
court, so that the legality of the regulation may be adjudicated 
upon. To this end the Philadelphia representatives of two manu- 
facturing pharmacists, Parke, Davis & Co. and Sharp & Dohme, 
have sold in person to Christopher Koch, vice-president of the 
Pennsylvania Board of Pharmaceutical Examiners, preparations 
labeled in accordance with the requirements of the national 
food and drugs act, but which did not bear upon their labels 
the notice required by the regulations of the Pennsylvania board. 
The presentation of the matter in this way to the court will re- 
sult in a decision which well serve as a guide for the officials of 
other states as well as those of Pennsylvania. We congratulate 
the board upon the wisdom of this method of determining the 
legality of the regulation, rather than by resort to the prosecu- 
tion of individual retailers, and we also voice the appreciation 
which the retail trade will undoubtedly feel of the unselfishness 
of the manufacturing pharmacists in arranging for this trial of 
the case direct rather than to submit their patrons in the retail 
trade to the annoyance of possible arrest and prosecution. What- 
ever may be the results of the trial we feel that much more is 
to be gained -for the public welfare by securing uniformity both 
of legislation and regulation throughout the United States than 
can be gained by independent and diverse action on the part of 
the different state authorities. 



Therapeutic nihilism has spread outside the 
The Drugless bounds of the medical profession. The 
Drug Store general public is fast losing faith in drugs. 

Christian Science, the Emmanuel movement, 
osteopathy and kindred cults are steadily turning the public away 
from the use of drugs. The multiplication of restrictions on 
the sale of drugs still further deters the public from their pur- 
chase and the hysterical outcries about the prevalence of adul- 
teration and the impossibility of securing pure drugs is fright- 
ening the public away from the drug store. It may be that we 
are better off without drugs, but to those of us whose life work 
is bound up in the drug business ; who believe in the efficacy of 
drugs, when properly administered, who know that there are pure 
drugs to be had on the market and who have witnessed a steady 
improvement in the quality for the past twenty years, these jere- 
miads against drugs and the drug trade seem most uncalled for 
and most reprehensible. If the public is to be continually har- 
angued on the wickedness of the drug trade and the impurity of 
our drugs we shall soon have no further use for drugs, or for 
a knowledge of them. We shall at last come to an era of drug- 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



21 



less drug stores, when colleges of pharmacy will be useful only 
for the education of the food analyst and the examinations of 
the board of pharmacy wdl be confined to questions on commer- 
cial law. 



The literature pertain- 
Precautions to Be Observed in S to dioxydiamidoars- 

in Preparing " 606." enobenzol, or salvarsan, 

as it has been recently 
christened, grows apace. Perhaps the most informing article on 
this new product of the chemotherapeutist, so far as pharmacists 
and chemists are concerned, has been written by Dr. Hugo 
Schweitzer, of the Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld. Himself a dye 
chemist, he was able to understand, as few others could, the af- 
finity of diazo compounds for the germs of disease, and he has 
made excellent use of his knowledge in a paper published re- 
cently in our contemporary, Science. In other columns we pub- 
lish a paper by Dr. Joseph L. Turner along similar lines, which 
we commend to the attention of our readers. Dr. J. W. Wain- 
wright, of the American branch of Farbwerke, vormals Meister, 
Lucius and Bruning, asks us to call attention to some of the 
dangers connected with the administration of the remedy. The 
danger of exposing salvarsan to the action of the atmosphere has 
been especially emphasized by him. The solutions should be 
made at the time of using, and this requires skill and patience. 
How to accomplish it will have to be carefully studied. Full in- 
structions as to making the solutions, the dose and technique for 
use accompany each ampul and these instructions should be strict- 
ly followed. There should be no experimenting with other 
methods, for what will be stated in the printed instructions will 
have been determined by thoroughly competent men after many 
thousands of applications. 



ALLOWANCES FOR RETURNED BOTTLES. 

AMERICAN pharmacists can scarcely form an idea of the 
extent to which the authorities supervise even the slightest 
actions of their European colleagues in countries where the ex- 
ercise of the profession is protected. The following incident, 
which recently took place in a small German town, will afford 
an illustration of the want of liberty which is the German apoth- 
eker's lot when he dares to fall foul of some regulation. 

T^HE charge for prescriptions in Germany is calculated on the 
» basis of separate charges for each ingredient and manipu- 
lation, as set forth in the state prescription tariff, which is issued 
annually by the Imperial authorities. The containers are espe- 
cially charged for, according to size, etc. A paragraph of this 
tariff states that when a prescription is repeated, the charge for 
the container must be deducted, provided the latter is returned 
clean and fit for use. This has long been an irksome obligation 
to pharmacists, which is strictly enforced in the case of sick club 
patients and even by private patients. The pharmacists contend 
that no container is ever returned fit for use, but in every case 
it must be cleaned, and they also point to the dangers resulting 
to assistants and others who have to handle bottles coming from 
sick persons. In spite of considerable agitation, this obligation 
still stands. However, the pharmacists of a little town decided 
to work out their own salvation in this matter; they agreed to 



deduct only a certain proportion of the full charge in the case 
of returned containers, and each owner placed a placard in his 
pharmacy informing his clients of this action taken to cover the 
expense of washing the dirty containers. This appalling act of 
mutiny came to the ears of the provincial governor, who, after 
he had recovered from the shock, issued a decree which was 
sent to each of the offending pharmacists, and in which their 
awful crime was forcibly made apparent by references to the 
paragraphs they had sinned against. The decree concludes with 
the promise that should a single case come to the ears of the 
authorities where one of. them has deducted less than the full 
charge for an empty container, "the offender will be prosecuted 
without mercy." 

"~p HE affair appears likely to assume larger proportions than 
* was at first anticipated. The delinquents state that they are 
only required to deduct the full charge when the containers are 
returned clean, as this is seldom the case, they contend that they 
are fully justified in their action and apparently they intend 
carrying the matter further. 



PHARMACEUTICAL ENDOWMENTS. 

I TNDER the will of the late A. H. Hollister, who was for 
^ many years one of the most prominent members of the 
Wisconsin Pharmaceutical Association, the sum of $10,000 has 
been left to the regents of the University of Wisconsin for the 
establishment of a graduate fellowship in pharmacy. A grad- 
uate fellowship in pharmacy was established many years ago by 
the late Frederick Stearns at the University of Michigan, and 
there are several undergraduate scholarship endowments at the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and probably a few which we 
do not recall at other institutions. Certainly their number is not 
large, nor, except in the case of the Hollister and Stearns fel- 
lowships, is their endowment liberal. The Massachusetts Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, as residuary legatee of the estate of the widow 
of Mr. Potter, of Weeks & Potter, received approximately $,50,- 
000. The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and the New York 
College of Pharmacy each received bequests of $2,500 in the will 
of the late Robert Wood Johnson, but aside from these there 
has been no substantial endowment received by any college of 
pharmacy in the United States. 

IN view of the fact that many men who began life as pharma- 
cists have accumulated great wealth, it is a matter of some 
surprise that so few have seen fit to include a college of phar- 
macy among the institutions remembered in their wills. One 
former pharmacist who died not long since gave a million dol- 
lars to educational institutions before his death and bequeathed 
nearly as much more to charitable, religious and educational in- 
stitutions when he died, but, though his fortune had been made 
in the drug trade, he did not remember the growing needs of 
the colleges of pharmacy. 

ONE of the reasons for this failure to appreciate the needs 
of colleges of pharmacy is that those needs have developed 
markedly within the past few years. The men who have made 
fortunes in the drug business remember the college of pharmacy, 
if they remember it at all, as the narrow, limited Institution of 
forty or fifty years ago. They have not kept pace with the ad- 
vances in pharmaceutical education and do not realize the expen- 



22 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



sive character of the equipment and staff now required of such 
a college. 

IN the old days there was no need for tne microscope, the 
polariscope and the hundreds of other expensive apparatus 
with the operation of which the modern pharmacist must be 
familiar. The college of pharmacy was little more than a trade 
school and the teachers devoted only a portion of their time to 
their professional work which they could, therefore, afford to 
do with little or no remuneration. Now the teaching of phar- 
macy in its various branches is a distinct calling, demanding the 
undivided time and attention of the teacher who must, therefore, 
look to the college for adequate income for his support. 

THE self-sacrificing and earnest pharmacists who laid the foun- 
dation for the present success of the existing colleges made 
them successful by their devotion and the sacrifice of their time 
and energies without recompense. But the time has passed when 
a pharmacist can likewise be a teacher by giving up a few hours 
a day to college work. The colleges must have sufficient re- 
sources to meet these changed conditions. 

A RECENT report of the auditors of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity shows that the school of pharmacy of that insti- 
tution, though reckoned among the most successful in the United 
States, has for several years past expended more than it has 
received in fees. Nor is this school unique in this respect. 

IN the report on medical education, prepared by Abraham Flex- 
ner for the Carnegie Foundation, the ground was taken that 
no institution could be expected to teach medicine successfully 
and pay its expenses from the fees received from students. We 
are rapidly approaching that condition in pharmacy, if it has not 
already been reached. If, therefore, the highest standards in 
pharmaceutical education are to be maintained, the colleges must 
receive aid from some source. Many have sought this aid 
through affiliation with universities. Some receive aid direct 
from the state, but the larger number must look to private bene- 
faction for the funds necessary to meet the constantly increasing 
demands for higher education in pharmacy. Assuredly no more 
noble or worthy monument could be erected to the name of any 
philanthropist than an endowment fund through which the youths 
of future generations could be enabled to equip themselves ade- 
quately to serve the public welfare in some department of phar- 
macy. 



SINGULAR MUDDLE IN GERMAN LAW. 

J T is a rare occurrence for a German law court to decide any 
statute to be illegal, and that accordingly no proceedings 
could be taken against the presumptive offender. Yet this has 
'ust occurred, and as it affects the sale of drugs it is of special 
interest to pharmacists, the more so as the situation which now 
results from this decision is passing strange, if not prepos- 
terous. 

\I/ITH the creation of the political entity known as the Ger- 
man Empire, the subjects and citizens of the various 
states and republics were, to a large extent, granted equal busi- 
ness rights in all the states. The general law regulating trade 
rights on a uniform basis throughout the empire was passed in 
1900. As pharmacy is not a free profession, it is distinctly ex- 



empted from the provisions of this law, but a paragraph is con- 
tained in it to the effect that the regulations pertaining to the 
sale of remedies outside of pharmacies are to be issued by 
Kaiserliche Verordnung (Imperial enactment). This refers to 
a measure bearing of an administrative character, dealing with 
the application of a law already passed by the parliament. In 
1901 the Imperial enactment regulating the sale of pharmaceuti- 
cal preparations outside of pharmacies was issued. This in- 
cluded two lists of preparations which might only be sold in 
pharmacies. A paragraph of this enactment stated that further 
additions to these lists should be made from time to time by the 
Imperial Chancellor. Since then the chancellor has made use 
of the power conferred upon him four times in all, with regard 
to seven preparations, the two latest additions being aspirin and 
veronal. 

SOME time ago a Prussian drug store was inspected, and on 
this occasion a forbidden preparation — a proprietary prepa- 
ration of knot grass (Polygonum aviculas), which had been 
added to the lists by the chancellor, was found in stock. The 
druggist was fined, but instead of paying up like a sinful of- 
fender, he saw fit to protest and carried his appeal to the high- 
est Prussian law court. The decision of this court caused pro- 
found amazement, and an inconceivable muddle is the result. 
The court found that the druggist had committed no offense, the 
simple reason that the chancellor had no power to add prepara- 
tions to the list issued in iooi, although this power was dele- 
gated to him by that enactment, and this on the grounds that the 
law of 1900 alone is decisive, in that it requires that any regula- 
tions affecting the sale of remedies outside a pharmacy shall be 
made by Imperial enactment, arid the Kaiser has no authority 
to delegate this power to the chancellor. 

AT first thought this would not strike one as very important; 
it only means, it might be said, that the druggist is now 
allowed to sell a few odd proprietaries and aspirin as well as 
veronal. It is round the latter preparation that the muddle now 
created centres. In 1908, shortly after the sale of veronal was 
restricted to pharmacies, a regulation was passed forbidding the 
sale of this preparation, except on a physician's prescription, and 
for every repetition of a prescription calling for veronal the 
doctor's signature, with the date, must be obtained. This still 
holds good for all pharmacists. The ridiculous situation is now 
presented that a druggist may sell a preparation without any 
restrictions which the pharmacist may only supply on the pro- 
duction of a prescription ; surely a peculiar anomaly when it is 
considered that these restrictions were imposed to safeguard the 
public from the evils of self-drugging! The amazing point is 
that heretofore nobody has ever questioned the legality of the 
chancellor's decrees, least of all the numerous lawyers acting in 
the druggists' interests. 

A N amusing side of the situation consists in the fact that in 
*» country districts it is often the custom for pharmacists to 
conduct a drug store in connection with his pharmacy, the two 
being usually side by side and intercommunicating. If a client 
enters the pharmacy and asks for veronal, the pharmacist will 
have to demand the production of a prescription, or request the 
client to go outside and enter by the "drug store" door, where 
he can get as much as he warts without any fuss! 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



23 



CHEMOTH ERAPY AN D "606." 

The Principles Followed by Ehrlich in His Studies of Experimental Therapy —Relation of 
Organotropy to Parasitotropy — Steps in the Study of the Arsenic Compounds. 

By- Joseph L. Turnek, Ph. D., 

Philadelphia. 



PHARMACOLOGY, as defined by Schmiedeberg, is an inde- 
pendent, purely biological science, which has for its pur- 
pose the investigation of pharmacological agents without any 
consideration of their practical application — i. e., the perform- 
ance of physiological reactions with chemically active bodies 
which may or may not be of importance from a toxicological, 
therapeutical or purely physiological standpoint. 

Adhering more or less closely to this definition of pharma- 
cology, the pharmacologists limit themselves to the description 
of effects of pharmacodynamically active bodies and of changes 
produced by them in organs and tissues. The empirical experi- 
ence thus gained represents in its sum total a very important 
and necessary knowledge, and it must be stated without reserva- 
tion that the study of pharmacodynamics is still necessary and is 
very promising in its results. By its study we are in a position 
to deal intelligently with known remedies, to apply them prop- 
erly and to avoid their untoward effects. How- 
ever, pharmacology, as defined above, cannot ex- 
tend to any degree the list of our materia medica ; 
and it is due to chemistry, which is at present 
such an important factor in medicine, that from a 
purely empirical science pharmacology has been 
elevated to the plane of an exact science. 

The Influence of Chemistry on Medicine. 

The influence of chemistry evidenced itself 
primarily in the study of the relation between 
chemical constitution and pharmacological action ; 
and the working hand in hand of synthetic chem 
ists and pharmacologists resulted in the produc- 
tion of innumerable new remedies. However, the 
new science followed necessarily the then known 
path of therapy — that is, it had for its purpose 
the combating of symptoms of maladies, but not 
of their causes. 

Still, it cannot be denied that great benefit 
to medicine was derived from the result- 
ing production of these symptomatic remedies. I shall 
mention here salicylic acid and its various derivatives, 
antipyrine, phenacetin, the new anaesthetics and hypnotics. 
At the same time, it must be acknowledged that not 
in a single- one of these remedies do we possess such specific 
cures as, for instance, quinine for malaria and mercury for 
syphilis. And yet the discovery of such specifics is the ideal aim 
of practitioners of medicine. 

In this direction pharmacology proper could not accomplish 
much. Experimentation on healthy animals precludes the pos- 
sibility of solving the problem: How do specific remedies act? 
and, outside of establishing the toxicity of a certain remedy and 
its physiological action, such experimentation does not explain 
the curative action of specifics. If we consider that potassium 
iodide and mercury influence certain diseases in doses which are 
practically harmless to the organism, it will at once be evident 
that the action of these remedies can be analyzed scientifically 
only by experimentation upon animals infected with the respec- 
tive diseases. 




JOSEPH L. TURNER. Ph.D 
Philadelphia. 



»Read before the Philadelphia Branch of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, January 3, 1911. 



Experimental Therapy. 

The study of the action of remedies on infected organisms 
constitutes experimental therapy, a new branch of pharmacology. 
The cardinal difference between pharmacotoxicology on one side 
and experimental therapy on the other is thus clear. The first 
experiments with healthy animals, the second with infected or- 
ganisms. Both of these branches of pharmacology are neces- 
sary, and their separation will be productive of great benefit for 
science, as it happened in the case of the separation of the 
normal anatomy from pathological anatomy. No matter how 
brilliant and gifted an investigator may be, it is no longer pos- 
sible for him to command the knowledge of the whole domain 
of science. In the same way as industry has reached the stage 
where its progress demands specialization of production, so sci- 
ence has reached the stage where a worker may obtain the best 
results only by limiting himself to a certain 
branch of science which he selects as his particu- 
lar field of endeavor. 

The Selective Affinity of Remelies. 

Pharmacology is indebted to experimental 
therapy for the introduction of the principle of 
selective affinity of remedies. It was found by 
Ehrlich that the distribution of various dyestuffs 
in the tissues of a living animal was entirely de- 
pendent on their chemical constitution. Thus 
methylene blue would color only nerve tissues ; 
neutral red he fixed only by the granules of cells, 
etc. According to this the dyes can be divided 
into neurotropic, lipotropic and polytropic, de- 
pending upon their fixation by nerve tissues, fat, 
etc. Similarly, the therapeutic action of any 
agent is dependent on its affinity or "tropy." A 
remedy can act on brain only when it is a 
neurotrope, on a certain organ when it 
possesses the respective organotropy, on para- 
sites when it is parasitotropic. The ideal remedial agents in in- 
fectious diseases are those which possess purely parasitotropic 
functions, and do not act at all organotropically. We possess 
such ideal remedies in serotherapy. There are, however, a num- 
ber of infectious diseases in which serotherapy is not applicable, 
such as malaria and trypanosomiasis and other diseases in which 
spirilla are the infecting parasites. In these cases chemical 
agents must come to the rescue; in other words, serotherapy 
must be replaced by chemotherapy. 

Organotropy and Parasitotropy. 

When we begin to deal with chemical substances poisonous 
to parasites we enter the domain of toxic bodies, injurious not 
only to the parasites, but also to the host — that is, sub- 
stances which are parasitotrope and organotrope at the same 
time. It is impossible to predict a priori how such chemical 
agents will behave in a curative experiment on animals. It 
was found by Koch, for example, that the bacillus of anthrax 
could be killed by a solution of corrosive sublimate of the 
strength of I in 100,000. When, however, he infected a guinea 
pig with anthrax and injected the animal afterward with such 



5 



24 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



an amount of corrosive sublimate that its concentration in the 
body was about ten times stronger than in the test tube experi- 
ment, the animal succumbed to acute mercury poisoning, while 
the parasites were not influenced in the least. The organotropy 
of mercury therefore overshadowed completely its parasitotropy. 

In order, therefore, to pursue successfully the science of 
chemotherapy it is necessary to find chemical agents which pos- 
sess great affinity for parasites in doses which do not prove toxic 
to the host. The methods employed in the successful accom- 
plishment of the desired result are those of chemical syn- 
thesis. 

The discovery of dioxydiamidoarsenobenzol and steps lead- 
ing to it is a remarkable illustration of the working mechanism 
of this new science and of results which can be achieved by it. 

The Arsenical Group of Remedies. 

Several years ago an arsenic derivative of aniline, atoxyl, 
was introduced into therapy, and it proved more beneficial than 
any remedy formerly known in combating diseases produced by 
trypanosomes, especially sleeping sickness, as shown by Robert 
Koch. Later, Uhlenhuth and Salmon found that atoxyl had a 
curative action on syphilis, though not so reliable as mercury. 
At the same time, serious untoward effects on human organisms 
were observed, chief of which was frequently occurring total 
blindness. It was therefore desirable to find similar prepara- 
tions which would possess a stronger curative action and be at 
the same time less toxic. The assumed chemical constitution of 
atoxyl, para-amidophenylarsinic acid, seemed to eliminate any 
possibility of experimentation with this product in synthetic 
work. The substitution of one of the hydrogens of the amido 
group for an acid radicle diminished its reactivity and it was 
to be expected that under the influence of chemical manipulations 
the acid group would be easily split off. In his first experiments 
with atoxyl, Ehrlich found that certain reactions indicated that 
its chemical constitution was different from that generally as- 
sumed, and, together with Bertheim, he was successful in prov- 
ing that atoxyl was a sodium salt of paramidophenylarsenic 
acid. This substance is obtained by heating aniline arsenate to 
about 200° C. for several hours, and this reaction is absolutely 
identical with one which occurs in the production of paramido- 
benzolsulphonic acid from aniline sulphate. This latter product 
is known under the name of sulphanilic acid and, following the 
usual terminology, Ehrlich gave the name of arsanilic acid to 
atoxvl. 

The recognition of the fact that atoxyl was not a chemically 
indifferent anilide, but a very stable and reactive amido deriva- 
tive of phenylarsinic acid, opened at once a wide field for chem- 
ical and biological investigation. Ehrlich succeeded easily by 
various substitutions in the amido group and introduction of 
active groups into the benzol ring in obtaining a large number of 
derivatives which all contained arsenic in organic combination. 
It was found that the introduction of various groups could either 
increase the toxicity of atoxyl or make it absolutely harmless 
and inactive, if we place the toxicity of sodium arsanilate as 1, 
the toxicity of some of its derivatives was 1/20; of some others, 
60 to 70 times higher. In other words, if one C.c. of a one-half 
percent, solution would be considered a high dose for a mouse 
of a body weight of Gm. 20, some substances were found to be 
so slightly toxic that an injection of a 10 percent, solution pro- 
duced no bad effect, while other bodies caused death when in- 
jected in a concentration of 1 in 15,000. Other interesting ob- 
servations were made: for example, some compounds (acetyl- 
arsanilarsacetin) converted ordinary mice into dancing mice; 
other compounds caused jaundice, the mice being colored deep 
yellow for a period of weeks and secreting urine which gave a 
biliary reaction, and on autopsy showed degeneration of the liver; 
others again caused profuse diarrhoea, or acted on the kidneys 

After the toxicity of these substances was established, their 
action on trypanosomes was investigated. In the course of these 
experiments it was found out that certain changes in the arsanilic 
acid radicle, for instance, the introduction of a sulphonic group 



diminished the toxicity of the compound to such a degree that 
it became less poisonous than sodium chloride, but when tried in 
curative experiments, it was found that such a compound did not 
influence the trypanosomes to any degree. The relative low 
toxicity of such a compound and its inactivity toward trypano- 
somes can be explained by the fact that the sulphuric acid radicle 
diminishes the affinity of such a compound for living cells. This 
action of an acid radicle upon the arsanilic acid is identical with 
ts action upon phenols. 

More favorable were the results obtained with acetyl arsanilic 
acid, which is obtained by the action of acetic acid anhydride 
upon the sodium salt of arsanilic acid. This compound possesses 
low toxicity for many species of animals. The curative effect 
upon mice is considerable. Ehrlich succeeded in curing with one 
injection of this compound mice whihh were doomed to die from 
infection within a few hours. Other compounds were prepared 
which acted similarly and even in a higher degree, and with 
their help, Ehrliclvs ideal of "therapia sterilisans magna" could be 
achieved — i. e.\ complete sterilization of a highly infected organ- 
ism by means of one injection. 

It was naturally to be expected that arsanilic acid, or the 
above cited derivatives, would act directly on trypanosomes. 
While some of the remedies which act on trypanosomes, such as 
triphenylmethylene dyes, fuchsin, arsenites, tartar emetic, com- 
pletely kill trypanosomes in the test tube, this was not found to he 
the case with arsanilic acid. This necessarily led to the assump- 
tion that arsanilic acid does not act directly in the organism, but 
that the latter modifies it, forming trypanocide substances. 

In the course of experimentation, it was found that arsanilic 
acid does not influence all mice in the same way. While on an 
average a one-third percent, solution was the dose tolerated by 
most mice, some mice were found which withstood easily double 
concentration and others succumbed to injections of one fourth 
percent, solutions. This was naturally ascribed to variations of 
constitutional nature and it was found that the therapeutic action 
of arsanilic acid was closely related to constitutional resistance 
against this compound. A mouse which can stand an injection 
of a 1 in 150 solution is not any more benefited by this strong 
solution than a mouse which is poisoned by a 1 in 400 solution. 
The latter dies from the toxic effect of the remedy, but its blood 
is completely free from trypanosomes. This led to the assumption 
that a toxic cleavage product of arsanilic acid is formed in the 
organisms which exercises its influence upon trypanosomes. In 
considering the possibilities of various cleavage products that 
could be formed from arsanilic acid, the reducing power of ani- 
mal tissues offered itself preeminently for the explanation of the- 
action of the organism upon this compound. 

Types of Arsenic Compounds. 

The oxygen compounds of arsenic belong to two types, that 
of arsenic acid in which arsenic has the function of a quintavalent 
element, and the other of arsenous acid, in which arsenic is 
valent. In arsanilic acid the arsenic combined with the benzene 
ring is quintavalent, that is, arsanilic acid is an aromatic arsenic 
acid. The next step was therefore to prepare reduction products 
of arsanilic acid in which arsenic would have the function of a 
trivalent element. Two of such reduction products were prepared 
by Ehrlich and Bertheim. The first one is the paramidophenyl- 
arsenoxide, a white substance soluble in acids and alkalies, which 
on further reduction furnishes diamidoarsenobenzol, a yellow 
substance soluble only in acids. 

These small changes in the nature of compounds resulted in 
complete change of their biological properties. From products 
with relatively low toxicity, highly poisonous substances were 
obtained. The arsenoxide compound kills mice when injected in 
a solution of 1 in 12,000, and the diamido product in a dilution of 
1 in 6,000. The most important fact, however, was their enor- 
mous influence upon trypanosomes in a test tube experiment. A 
dilution of 1 in 100.000 kills them at once, and a dilution of I in- 
1,000,000 within half an hour. If it is remembered that a 5 per- 
cent, solution of arsanilic acid exerts no influence upon parasites,. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 

it will be seen that a complete change is produced by an abstrac- 
tion of a single oxygen atom. This proves conclusively that ar- 
sanilic acid as such does not exercise any influence at all in the 
organism, but that living tissues reduce a small part of the 
amount introduced, which then acts as a trypanocide. 

In order, therefore, to obtain the proper therapeutic results it 
is necessary to introduce into organisms proper remedial agents 
prepared outside of the body and not leave the organism to per- 
form the necessary synthetic work. 

Acquired Resistance. 

Another important factor developed in the course of experi- 
mentation. It was found that gradual injections of small doses 
•of various arsenic compounds resulted in the production of gen- 
erations of trypanosomes which became resistant to arsenical 
medication, that is, while influenced by arsenicals in comparatively 
low concentration, a few surviving parasites later multiplied 
themselves in the body and required then a higher concentration 
of the medicament for their destruction. Gradually, their re- 
sistance becomes so high that a dose of an arsenic compound 
sufficiently high to kill the animal could be introduced into the 
organism without any effect upon trypanosomes. 

I shall not burden you with the explanation of Ehrlich's 
theory as to how such resistance is acquired. The important part 
is the fact that it was necessary to find a compound which could 
be introduced into the organism in a sufficiently large dose to 
kill all the parasites at once without causing any damage to the 
animal. Such a compound was found to be arsenphenylglycine 
(No. 418 in a series of products prepared by Ehrlich). 

While this remedy accomplished all that was expected from 
it in regard to trypanosomes, it had little effect on spirilla. How- 
ever, continuing along the lines described above, Ehrlich finally 
succeeded in introducing No. 592 of the series, dioxydiamido- 
arsenobenzol, and its dihydrochloride, No. 606. 

Although this substance can be prepared from atoxyl, this 
method is very tedious and unsatisfactory. It is much more 
easily prepared by heating arsenic acid with phenol, by which 
paraoxyphenylarsenic acid is obtained. On nitration, metanitro- 
paraoxyphenylarsenic acid is obtained. When this substance is 
reduced, dioxydiamidoarsenobenzol is produced. The reduction 
can be conducted in such a way that two intermediary products 
■can be isolated. The first is paraoxyamidophenylarsenic acid and 
the second is paraamidophenylarsenoxide. 

The process for preparing this compound is patented in Ger- 
many by Farbwerke Vorm. Meister, Lucius & Briining, of 
Hoechst-on-the-Main, and, with the exception of the short state- 
ment by Ehrlich as to the method of preparation of 606, the 
-patent specification is the only source of information in regard 
to its production. For that reason I shall give a complete trans- 
lation of it : 

The Patent Specifications. 

It was found that products useful from a therapeutic point 
■of view can be obtained from oxyarylarsenic acid, if these acids 
are nitrated raid the nitro derivatives thus obtained subsequently 
reduced. 

Amido oxyarylarseno compounds produced in this way are 
remarkable for their action on spirilla of relapsing fever, namely, 
animals infected with the latter can be completely cured by one 
injection. An action similar to that cannot be obtained by any 
heretofore known arsenic compounds. 

Example 1. 

144 grammes of sodium paraoxyphenylarsenate dried at 8o° C. 
are introduced in small portions into 450 Cc. of concentrated sul- 
phuric acid, the temperature of which is maintained at 0° C. A 
mixture of 39 Cc. nitric acid (sp. gr. 1.4) and 39 Cc. concentrated 
sulphuric acid are then added drop by drop, with constant stir- 
ring, taking care that the temperature does not rise above o°. 
When all of the mixture is added, the stirring is continued and 
the temperature is raised gradually to io°. The mixture is then 
poured in 2,250 Cc. of water, allowed to stand for twelve hours 
and the precipitated nitrophenylarsinic acid filtered off. This 
acid is a yellowish white crystalline powder, which decomposes 
on heating with ignition. It is readily soluble in hot water, 
-sparingly in cold water, very easily soluble in alcohol, in acetone, 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 25 

and in glacial acetic acid. Its alkali salts are bright yellow in 
color and dissolve readily in water. 

The reduction of nitrooxyarylarsenic acids results in the pro- 
duction of amidooxyarylarsenic acids or of amidooxy derivatives 
of arsenobenzol, from which the corresponding arsenic acids can 
be regenerated. 

Example 2. 

Reduction of nitrophenylarsenic acid with sodium amalgam. 

A solution of 31.6 grammes nitrophenylarsenic acid in 600 Cc. 
methyl alcohol is digested with 440 grammes of a 4 percent, so- 
dium amalgam at 60 to 70° C. until the evolution of gas ceases. 
450 to 506; Cc. of methyl alcohol are then distilled off, the re- 
sidue is taken up with 120 Cc. of water and after separation 
from mercury, acidified with 150 Cc. of hydrochloric acid (sp. gr. 
1. 19). After allowing it to stand for twelve hours, the solution 
is filtered off from separated impurities, the filtrate is boiled with 
animal charcoal and filtered again ; 52 Cc. one-tenth normal so- 
dium hydroxide solution is then added, when aminophenyolar- 
senic acid crystallizes out. This acid forms microscopic prisms, 
which, on heating, begin to blacken at 170 0 C. and decompose 
without melting. It is very sparingly soluble in water and in or- 
ganic solvents; very easily soluble in alkalies, also in solutions 
of ammonia and sodium bicarbonate, and in dilute mineral acids. 
Its alkaline solution gives a deep green coloration with hypo- 
chlorites, and its acid solution a red coloration with one drop of 
potassium bichromate solution. 

Example 3, 

Reduction with sodium hydrosulphite. 

66 grammes of nitrophenylarsenic acid are dissolved in 700 Cc. 
of water and 125 Cc. of double normal sodium hydroxide solution. 
To this solution is added anhydrous sodium hydrosulphite in 
small portions, and if the temperature rises above 30 0 C, the 
mixture is cooled with water. The addition of hydrosulphite is 
continued until the originally yellow solution is just decolorized, 
for which purpose 130 to 140 grammes of anhydrous salt are 
required. If the whole is then cooled to o° C, the amidophenyl- 
arsenic acid crystallizes out, especially easily if the solution is 
inoculated with a few crystals of the finished preparation. 

Example 4. 

66 grammes of nitrophenylarsenic acid are dissolved in a mix- 
ture of 1,320 Cc. of water and 225 Cc. of double normal sodium 
hydroxide solution. This solution is added to a solution of 855 
grammes of anhydrous sodium hydrosulphite and 171 grammes 
of crystallized magnesium chloride in 4,275 Cc. of water. If this 
solution is heated to 50° C. for some time, a yellow microcrys- 
talline precipitate is formed which consists of diamidodioxy- 
arsenobenzol. In order to separate it completely, the heating is 
continued until some of the solution, when filtered, remains clear 
on boiling. When filtered off and dried, it represents a yellow 
powder which is soluble in hydrochloric acid and also in sodium 
hydroxide and sodium carbonate. Acetic acid precipitates it from 
its alkaline solutions. By suitable oxidation, aminophenolarsenic 
acid can be reformed from it. 

Example 5. 

7.32 grammes of dioxydiamidoarsenobenzol are dissolved in 
120 Cc. of normal sodium hydroxide solution. To this solution, 
a 10 percent, hydrogen dioxide solution is added, with stirring 
and cooling (by means of ice), until the yellow color of the 
liquid disappears. Upon acidifying the filtered solution with 15.6 
Cc. of hydrochloric acid (sp. gr. T.12), amidophenolarsenic acid 
crystallizes out. 

It will be of interest to consider several points of importance 
for the explanation of the spirillocide function of the new sub- 
stance. Ehrlich's experiments with arsenicals established beyond 
any doubt that their destructive action depended primarily on the 
trivalent arsenic radicle in the arseno group. In this connection 
it may be mentioned that the corresponding arsenoxide possesses 
an extraordinary spirillocide action, but its toxicity is also cor- 
respondingly higher. On the other hand, paraoxyamidophenyl- 
arsenic acid is less toxic, but requires dangerously high doses for 
complete sterilization of a mouse. 

The second important atomic group is the hydroxyl group in 
para position to the arseno radicle. Arsenophenol itself possesses 
a high spirillocide power; it is, however, very difficult to pre- 
pare it sufficiently pure in large quantities ; moreover, it is ex- 
ceedingly toxic and oxidizes very readily to paraoxyphenyl- 
arsenoxide, which exercises deleterious effects on the organism. 

Ehrlich's experience with various trypanocide dye stuffs 
taught him that if a benzene derivative possesses two different 
atomic groups, both pharmacodynamically active, and one of 



26 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



which has saltforming functions (NH 2 or OH-group), the thera- 
peutic activity of such a benzene derivative could be increased 
in the desired direction by the introduction of a third atomic 
group in the ortho position to the saltforming group. Two hun- 
dred different, and sometimes very complicated, derivatives of 
phenylarsinic acid were prepared and tested biologically before 
it was finally settled that the introduction of an amido group in 
the ortho position to the hydroxyl group in arsenophenol modi- 
fies the latter in the desired direction — i. e. : increases its activity 
and diminishes its toxicity. 

The First Practical Result of Experimental Chemotherapy. 

Six hundred and six, or Salvarsan. as it is to be known, is 
the first practical result achieved by the new science — chemo- 
therapy, the fundamental principles of which have been outlined 
above. Progress in chemistry, and especially in synthetic chem- 
istry, always marked progress in medicine, and this new union 
of chemistry and therapy opens an unlimited field for scientific 
investigation and promises brilliant results. Let us hope that 
an Institute for Experimental. Chemotherapy, similar to the 
Institute at Frankfort-on-the-Main, will soon be established 
in this country, and in this hope I shall conclude with 
Ehrlich's definition of the purpose of such an institute, as stated 
by him at the annual meeting of the Verein Deutscher Chemiker 
in 1909: 

"Concisely speaking, the purpose of an institute for experi- 
mental chemotherapy consists in discovering, by means of sys- 
tematic and extensive experimentation on animals, specific rem- 
edies and not mere symptomatics, which affect only this or that 
symptom, such as fever, neuralgia, insomnia. This institute 
should consist of at least two departments, one for biology and 
therapeutics, and the other for chemical synthesis. But let me 
emphasize that I do not believe that any institute of this char- 
acter will -ever achieve success unless it enjoys the same unlim- 
ited support of chemical industries that I have enjoyed in the 
course of my work." 

Research Laboratory, H. K. Mulford Company. 



Suspensions and Solutions of Salvarsan. 

W. Harrison Martindale is the author of a note on the prepa- 
ration of salvarsan, published in the Chemist and Druggist for 
December 17, 1910, which is calculated to be helpful to pharma- 
cists who have occasion to assist medical men in preparing in- 
jections of the substance. The note is based on an experiment 
performed in his laboratory. The contents of a tube (Gm. 06) 
were divided into two approximately equal portions, one weigh- 
ing Gm. 0.288 and the other Gm. 0.3. It was proposed to pre- 
pare experimentally an intramuscular or subcutaneous injection, 
as it would be employed in practice, from the smaller portion. 
This amount was, therefore, placed in a little dish and rubbed 
with a pestle with the addition of 4 drops of 15 percent, sodium 
hydroxide solution as directed. The mixture clogs somewhat, 
necessitating turning it over a few times with a clean spatula. 
Sterile distilled water was then added from a measure containing 
5 Cc, drop by drop at first. The total S Cc. having been added, 
it was found that, firstly, 2 or 3 more drops of the sodium hy- 
droxide solution were requisite to neutralize to litmus as the 
mixture was still acid; secondly, that at least another 1 Cc. of 
water had to be added to render the mixture at all capable of 
removal from the dish to the previously sterilized hypodermic 
syringe by pouring, though it could be drawn up if the needle were 
wide enough in calibre. The suspension of the basic substance 
dioxydiamidoarsenobenzol thus prepared — i, e., after the two 
HC1 radicals have been neutralized, forms a homogeneous cream, 
and is then ready for use. Note. — Dilute hydrochloric acid of 
B. P. strength may be used to overcome any slight excess of 
alkali should it have been previously added by mistake. The 
other portion of "606" (Gm. 0.3) was treated somewhat more 
scientifically, as "drops" are known to vary. It was placed in 
a small glass mortar and rubbed with 5 Cc. of water, in which 



quantity it is easily soluble (the exact solubility was not deter- 
mined, but it certainly dissolved in 3 Cc). N/10 sodium hy- 
droxide was then added from a burette. A precipitate formed, 
which redissolved until 5.8 Cc. had been added. The mixture 
became gelatinous when 6.4 Cc. had been added, and looked 
somewhat like melted yellow petroleum jelly, becoming thinner 
again on further addition of alkali (6.8 Cc. according to theory 
are required to produce the mono-hydrochloride). Adding the 
alkali further it was found that 12 Cc. approximately in all were 
requisite to neutralize to litmus paper — i. e , the formation of the 
base (theory demands 13.7 Cc). Adding alkali further the pre- 
cipitate visibly diminished, an almost clear solution being formed 
when 18 Cc. in all had been added (theory demands 20.5 Cc. for 
the formation of the mono-sodium compound — the third stage in 
the matter). The addition of a further quantity of alkali (up to 
27.4 Cc— the amount theoretically necessary for the di-sodium 
compound) did not render the solution absolutely clear, but fil- 
tration would effectually remove the slight opalescence. 

For intravenous use a more dilute solution has been advised 
by the makers — e. g., Gm. 0.5 is to be treated with 0.95 Cc. of 15 
percent, by weight of sodium hydroxide solution, the liquid being 
finally diluted to about 200 Cc. If we transpose this amount of 
alkali into terms of N/10 sodium hydrate it will be found to 
work out to about 40.9 Cc. (theory demands 34 Cc. approxi- 
mately for the mono-sodium compound). The 40.9 Cc. is the- 
oretically equivalent to a compound of equal molecular propor- 
tions of mono and di-sodium bodies. I do not say there is such 
a body. I merely point out the fact. I assume that the propor- 
tion of alkali in question is deemed safe and satisfactory by the 
manufacturers. Marked excess of alkali is to be avoided in all 
forms of the injection. 



Hydrogen Dioxide in Ether. 

Commenting 011 the article by L. L. Walton, of Williamsport, 
Pa., on Hydrogen Dioxide in Ether, which was published in the 
American Druggist for August 8, 1910, the editor of Drug 
Topics says that considerable interest was aroused in Germany 
and England in the eighties by the discovery that ether then fre- 
quently contained an impurity that would liberate iodine from 
potassium iodide. At first the trouble was said to be due to the 
presence of ozone, as Schoenbein, the discoverer of ozone, had 
observed that this body was formed when ether was allowed to 
come in contact with air. Later the impurity was proved to be 
hydrogen dioxide. The reason for its formation was not gen- 
erally understood, but it was supposed to be formed from the 
action of ozone on the water invariably found in commercial 
ether, the ozone in the first place being produced by the slow 
evaporation of the ether in contact with air. The impurity was 
not generally found in fresh ether, but usually in samples that 
had been kept for some time in partly filled bottles. It is in- 
teresting to note that Mr. Walton's ether, which contained thr 
dioxide, had been kept for some time in a partly filled container. 
In the course of the discussion of this subject it was noted in 
England that ether made from methylated spirit (denatured 
alcohol) was much more liable to contain an impurity that led 
to the formation of hydrogen dioxide than ether made from 
pure alcohol, and the fact that most of our ether today is made 
from denatured alcohol may be the reason for the fresh crop- 
ping up of this impurity. In any event it would seem advisable 
for the U. S. P. to provide a test for hydrogen dioxide as sug- 
gested by Mr. Walton, and the simple statement that "ether 
should yield no blue coloration when 10 cc are shaken with 
5 cc of a very dilute solution of potassium chromate (1 in 1000) 
acidulated with dilute sulphuric acid" would cover this point 
amply. It is, however, surprising to learn that a manufacturer 
of ether should be unable to explain the presence of hydrogen 
dioxide therein. The remedy for the trouble is simple. See 
that the ether is free from water and keep it in full containers in 
a cool dry place protected from the light. 



8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



27 



THE PHARMACIS TS OF NAP OLEONS ARMIES 

Reliance Placed by Emperor Napoleon on Integrity of His Pharmacist Officers— Privations They 

Endured and Emergencies They Rose To. 



Narrated by F. Ashford White, Paris Correspondent of the American Druggist. 



A HUNDRED years ago Napoleon I had reached the zenith 
of his career. Arbiter of Europe, husband of the daughter 
of the Caesars, he had for the furtherance of his ambition an 
army unequalled in modern times. 

This innumerable and then invincible host has been specially 
studied from various points of view by many eminent writers of 
every nation; but 'one of its details, and that surely not the least 
interesting, its pharmaceutical service, seems still to await its 
historian. 

This devoted band of noncombatants, a veteran has borne 
witness, "aided their confreres, the surgeons, in their painful and 
dangerous task, even on the field of battle. Never did they 
shrink from the post of danger, either when it was necessary, 
during a retreat, to abandon hospitals to the enemy or when 
epidemics in these same establishments offered even more dead- 
ly risks than the battlefield itself." 

Statistics of the Sanitary Service. 

Bonaparte's army of Egypt, organized by the famous Larrey, 
included 150 surgeons and presumably about 90 pharmacists. 
Desgenettes has placed on record the losses during the campaign. 
Twenty-four pharmacists fell victims to the plague five died of 
other maladies and one met with an accidental death. After 
Waterloo, when the French army was placed on a peace footing, 
the number of pharmacists was fixed at 147 : a figure not essen- 
tially differing from the present actual number of French army 
pharmacists. But evidently the war strength was much 
greater; it probably amounted to several hundreds. Napoleon's 
armies being spread all over Europe, the framing of complete 
statistics was a rare event. But when in June, 1812, he mus- 
tered his Grande Armee of 617,000 men on the Niemen to com- 
mence that invasion of Russia, which was the first step to his 
final downfall, he had a report drawn up of his forces, which 
shows the sanitary staff as follows : Imperial headquarters — One 
physician, two surgeons, one pharmacist major; army head- 
quarters — One chief physician, thirteen doctors, one chief sur- 
geon, four majors, four assistants, sixteen sub-assistants, one 
chief pharmacist, three majors, three assistant and six sub-assist- 
ant pharmacists. 

Each divisional ambulance staff included one surgeon major, 
two assistant majors and twelve sub-assistant surgeons (of 
whom two were told off for pharmacy work\ one assistant doc- 
tor and one assistant major pharmacist. 

The Retreat from Moscow. 

When 40,000 ragged frost-bitten skeletons, the remnants of 
the "Grande Armee," straggled back across the frontier from 
Russia six months later, nearly all the pharmacists had disap- 
peared with their comrades. Of the ten "chief" and "principal" 
pharmacists who crossed the Niemen, only Laubert and Lodi- 
bert returned. Sureau, chief pharmacist of the Imperial Guard 
(formerly a navy pharmacist) ; Gouverneur and CoquMliette had 
been frozen to death; Desertine and Chaumont had died of 
typhus; Bruloy, Romonet and Reynard were left behind in hos- 
pital. Ruchet, pharmacist major, and Delavau, assistant phar- 
macist, had last been noticed, both wounded, among the strug- 
gling crowd of fugitives, which the Cossacks were driving to- 
wards the fatally blocked bridge over the icy Berezina, the most 
terrible scene of all that terrible retreat. They were never seen 
or heard of again. Boganti and Ruinet, also wounded, managed 



to cross over, only to die a month later. Legay, sub-assistant, 
had been killed at Wiasma in an earlier stage of the retreat. 
This scanty record may serve to illustrate the fate of their 
numerous comrades, buried beneath the snows, speared by Cos- 
sack pursuers, or prisoners of war in Russian towns. The 
"Grande Armee" was no more. 

Two of the Survivors. 

Lodibert lived to become chief pharmacist of its successor, 
and after Waterloo lived a peacefully active life in a similar 
capacity in various military hospitals, and acted as president of 
the Paris Society of Pharmacy in 1832. When he retired, in 
1835, he had seen forty-one years' service in army pnarmacy 
during a period of exceptional interest. 

A French Franklin. 

Laubert is described by Lodibert as having "in his handsome 
face and noble character, many features of resemblance with 
Benjamin Franklin. Like him, he served with disinterested zeal, 
and after having occupied high posts died in a financial position 
not even answering to the aurea mediocritas of his favorite au 
thor, Horace." 

Yet this man had been trusted by Napoleon with untold gold. 
When the French began their retreat from Moscow there were 
huge ingots of gold and silver which it was necessary to coin 
and distribute. A veritable mint had to be organized, and Daru 
could not conceal his dismay from his imperial master. "Haven't 
we Laubert here?" said Napoleon, with his usual brief decision. 
"I place the whole matter in his hands." And his confidence 
was justified. Laubert carried out this novel work with the 
same businesslike efficiency which he had shown in victualing 
and keeping up the hospitals and forts along the frontier. It 
is to him that the French soldier owes the improvement of the 
quality of his bread ration; and his researches regarding cin- 
chona foreshadowed the discovery of quinine itself. In his 
younger days he was, in spite of his own protests, elected by his 
Neapolitan fellow citizens president of their Parthenopean Re- 
public (1709). He retained this post till tranquility was re- 
stored; but then cheerfully relinquished his unsought honors to 
reassume his more congenial work as military pharmacist. 

The celebrated Parmentier, who died in 1813, wore for half 
a century the uniform of army pharmacist. His nephew was as- 
sistant major pharmacist in the Army of the Peninsula in 1808. 
This young fellow was captured by the Spaniards and put to 
death, a comrade 1 states, by being sawn between two planks. 
Constanty was nearly sixty, and had reached the rank of princi- 
pal pharmacist, when he was wounded in the field of "battle at 
Eylau when attending his fallen comrades, and was placed on 
the retired list two years later. Alyon, chief pharmacist of the 
Imperial Guard, followed Napoleon in his 1813 campaigns, re- 
turned exhausted at the end of a few months, and died in 1816. 
When the young artillery officer, Bonaparte, bombarded Toulon, 
a youthful pharmacist, Astier, was captured by the English, and 
was long a prisoner of war. He returned to serve under Napo- 
leon, and appears to have been the first to apply corrosive sub- 
limate to the preservation of wood.. Boudet, in Egypt with 
Bonaparte, organized breweries and distilleries for the troops 
while regularly inspecting pharmacies and sitting on health coun- 
cils. 

'Sebastian Blaze, assistant pharmacist major. 



28 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



In 1806 Brault, with one doctor, attended 1,500 sick and 
wounded for over two months in Dalmatia, and received the 
Cross of the Legion at the age of nineteen for this service. At 
Bautzen, in 1813, he remained, the last man in the rear guard, 
under the enemy's fire, till every man of his 500 wounded had 
been carried off. In the Waterloo campaign he was pharmacist 
to Milhand's division of cuirrassiers. Serullas, the eminent pro- 
fessor of chemistry, who died of the cholera in 1832 and was 
buried at the expense of the state, was principal pharmacist to 
Marshal Ney's army corps in 1813; he had then served twenty 
years in the sanitary corps. 

It would be wearisome to continue this list, which already 
amply suffices to indicate the heroism and devotion, scientific 
eminence and practical services of this remarkable corps at a re- 
markable epoch. 

Pharmaceutical Autobiography 

A few extracts from two clever books of memoirs may fit- 
tingly close these brief notes and give some idea of the stirring 
life which awaited even the noncombatant officer in those mo- 
mentous years of European strife. 

It is perhaps on the principle that "lookers on see most of 
the game" that two of the most picturesque recitals of the War 
in the Peninsula (1808-14) are from the pen. of two young 
French pharmacists — Antoine Fee and Sebastian Blaze. While 
their education and natural intelligence enables them to give an 
eloquent and impressive account of that seamy side of war over 
which the combatant narrator slurs in his anxiety "to fight his 
battles o'er again," their youthful and natural high spirits and 
good humor rob their over true tale of half of its horror, and 
render some of their pages as amusing as Charles Lever's Penin- 
sular novels. 

Antoine Fee. 

A few of the older generation of living French pharmacists 
can still remember Fee, who died at Paris in 1874. At the age 
of eighteen he saw there was no chance of escaping military con- 
scription, and having no taste for actual bloodshed resolved to 
qualify as an army pharmacist, and thus remain at least a non- 
combatant. This was easily managed. For a studious well edu- 
cated youth the army entrance examination of those days was a 
mere farce ; in fact, Fee found ample time to give a helping hand 
to his desk neighbor, who was a candidate for a post as military 
surgeon, and who passed with flying colors, thanks to this oblig- 
ing collaboration. 

Sebastian Blaze. 

The other autobiographical pharmacist was a comrade of 
Fee's during his Andalusian service. When Blaze was at Madrid 
with young Parmentier he had a disagreeable experience. The 
French army pharmacists in the Spanish capital had organized 
a little dinner, which began in gayety and good fellowship, but 
ended in a quarrel and a duel. One of the young fellows was 
shot by his comrade, and as a punishment for this folly all pres- 
ent at the dinner were ordered to remain in the hospitals with 
the wounded French soldiers when the approach of the Spanish 
forces obliged Napoleon's troops to abandon Madrid. In those 
days, before the Geneva Convention neutralized hospitals, sur- 
geons, pharmacists and wounded men were all considered as 
prisoners of war. Blaze was marched off to Cadiz, enduring 
shocking hardships and ill treatment on the way, and placed on 
one of the Spanish hulks moored off the city under the guns of 
the British fleet. The perusal of his experiences on board this 
floating prison enables one to realize the force of Napoleon's 
speech to his soldiers on a memorable occasion : "Let those who 
have been aboard the hulks recount to their comrades the mis- 
eries they have endured." But aboard a hospital ship— and most 
of the French prisoners were wounded or invalids — a pharmacist 
is a person of importance, and Blaze was one of the luckiest on 
shipboard, having a private cabin and slight medical comforts. 
He longed, however, for freedom, and organized a daring 



scheme. This was to cut the cables when a heavy storm was- 
blowing toward the shore, and thus allow the hulks to drift and 
wreck upon the coast, where the nightly camp fires of the French 
army had long tantalized the sight of the hapless prisoners. 

After two unsuccessful attempts Blaze and his comrades car- 
ried out their plan. The guardships opened fire, and the carnage 
was terrible; but the survivors reached land, although Blaze re- 
ceived a shot which made him limp for years. The tale of how 
these naked hungry wretches were kept practical prisoners by 
their newly found countrymen till the general's orders could be 
obtained as to clothing, rations, etc., is worthy of the best tradi- 
tions of the red tape and circumlocution offices which flourish 
in every self-respecting army. However, Blaze, a merry, happy 
go lucky fellow, a typical southern Frenchman, made the best of 
an uncomfortable forty-eight hours, and was soon sent to Se- 
ville, where all his pharmacist comrades and many combatant 
officers vied in their flattering attentions \o the "hero of the 
hulks." 

There is little of pharmacy in either of these two books, but 
as picturesque accounts of the life of a young noncombatant 
officer in Napoleon's sanitary service they are perhaps un- 
equaled. They prove, at least, that the pharmaceutical corps of 
his day included many men of keen intelligence and high attain- 
ments, whose courage in the hour of danger was allied to a hu- 
mane and even sensitive disposition and who were thoroughly 
"good fellows" into the bargain. 

NOTE ON A NEW FORM OF BELLADONNA ADULTERA- 
TION. 1 

By Charles E. Vanderkleed, Phar. D., 

Philadelphia. 

A rather unusual form of belladonna leaf adulteration has 
just come to the writer's attention. On receipt at the Philadel- 
phia port of entry of thirteen bales of belladonna leaf, imported 
from London, a sample was taken from each of eleven bales, 
thoroughly mixed and divided into two portions. One portion 
was examined in the laboratory of C. S. Brinton, chief of the 
Philadelphia branch of the United States Bureau of Chemistry', 
and the other sample was assayed in our laboratories. 

While our assays were being carried out I received a report 
from Mr. Brinton stating that the goods were adulterated with 
cut belladonna stems. An examination of the sample readily 
disclosed the fact that an unusually large quantity of stems were 
present, and, moreover, they were of such appearance as to in- 
dicate that they had been added intentionally to increase the 
weight of the belladonna leaf. The stems were heavy, almost 
woody in texture, and were uniformly about V/z inches in 
length. That they were stems of Atropa Belladonna was, how- 
ever, verified by a report from Dr. H. H. Rusby, of New York. 

The result of an assay of a ground portion of a four pound 
sample amounted to 0.265 percent, of total mydriatic alkaloids. 

The thirteen bales were promptly ordered to be returned to 
the exporters in London. There being some differences of opin- 
ion, however, as to the alkaloidal content of belladonna stems, 
the remaining portion of our four pound sample was garbled, the 
leaves being very carefully separated from the stems. On sub- 
jecting each portion separately to assay the leaf portion was 
found to contain 0.298 percent, mydriatic alkaloids, while the 
stem portion contained 0.175 percent. The latter figure is some- 
what surprising, owing to the belief entertained by many that the 
stems of belladonna are devoid of alkaloid. Such, however, 
seems not to be the case. 

Basing a calculation upon the three sets of assays here re- 
corded it would appear that the sample consisted of about 73 
percent, of leaves and about 27 percent, of added stems. 
Analytic Laboratories, 
H. K. Mulford Company, 
December 6, 1910. 



•Read before the Scientific Section of the Philadelphia Branch, A. 
Ph. A., December 8, 1910. 



10 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



29 



THE TELEPHONE IN THE DRUG STORE. 1 

By Wilhelm Bodemann, 

Hyde Park, Chicago, 111. 
Why is it that after the retail druggists in our larger cities 
have demonstrated by years of experience that the telephone in 
their stores can be made a splendid money maker, turning ex- 
pense into revenue and giving them a first class service, that in 
hundreds of other cities the druggists do not fall in line and 
emancipate themselves from the old free lunch nuisance tele- 
phone? The success of this movement has been so thoroughly 
demonstrated it would seem as if every druggist in the United 
States tomorrow would want to get into the band wagon and 
make a profit instead of a loss out of his telephone. They are 
doing this slowly, to be sure, but after all these years of expe- 
rience it would seem as if all should join. 

Wherever the slot telephone has been introduced it has been 
found a winner from the start. Pessimists in large cities, gen- 
erally the larger down town stores, have at first feared that the 
slot pay telephone would prove injurious. The reverse has been 
the result in most cities ; where these down town stores over- 
came their fears we can show you by figures that some of them 
pay a good part of their high rent by these pay telephones, and, 
as you all know, figures don't lie. By figures I can demonstrate 
these large down town stores have their own telephones free of 
expense, always open for inpouring orders, and clear a heavy 
share of the rent to boot. It does not require legal evidence to 
prove the fact that a man who has business to transact over the 
telephone values his time more than the expenditure of a nickel, 
hence talks condensed — shorthand, as it were — while a free 
luncher, who telephones because the telephone is free, has time. 
to burn, and knocks your own telephone out of business for busi- 
ness. The telephone companies are willing to establish pay tele- 
phones; the public is willing to pay for telephone service, why 
should the druggist stand back and let their chance of reaping 
a harvest go to waste by refusing to introduce pay telephones? 
The great N. A. R. D. has made the introduction of pay tele- 
phones an issue, and this issue has brought results in the in- 
creased membership in every city where pay telephones have 
been established. I assert that the great A. Ph. A , standing as 
it does for all that is "good and pure" and in the line of uplift 
movements, should add the introduction of pay telephones to its 
strongest arms of activities. I use the phrase "good and pure" 
advisedly; I need not go into a long argument, because I dis- 
like long winded harangues, to prove to you, my brethren of the 
A. Ph. A., that I deprecate profanity, and on that account I ad- 
vocate slot telephones, simply for their purifying remedial prop- 
erties. With the old line telephones I have heard more sul- 
phurous invocations in pharmacies than can ever be looked for in 
Dante's Inferno. Introduce fireproof, soundproof booths with 
the pay telephones, and the service becomes at once so admirable 
that the drug store atmosphere changes to the environments of a 
Moody and Sankey revival meeting. I would therefore strongly 
advise the establishment of a standing committee of your sec- 
tion, devoting its energies to the promotion of pay telephones. 

I wish I could have been briefer, but my time is limited, and 
I recommend a discussion of this subject to your good graces. 

I attach as a sample of my method of going at it a letter ad- 
dressed to Kansas City druggists, which I wish to make a part 
of this paper. 

To the Kansas City Druggists : 

If I were in the place of the Kansas City druggists, I would 
do one of three things : 

First, I would induce the Home Telephone Company to install 
slot phones, for reasons explained in this letter. 

Second, If the company refused to install slot phones, put the 
Home phone in a part of the room where it is not accessible to 
the public. 

Third, Should the Home Telephone Company decline to re- 
move the phones to back room, or refuse to install slot phones, 

'Presented to the Commercial Section of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association at the meeting- held in Richmond, Va-, May, 1910. 



do away with the unprofitable phone altogether, for following 
reasons : 

Nothing better illustrates the fact that experience is the great- 
est teacher than the evolution of the drug store telephone. There 
are few cities of any size in which the druggist has not been able 
to find out that if he has a slot machine telephone he gets good 
service for himself and for the public, and that he as well puts 
into his pocket a substantial return of the service rendered. The 
old practice was bad service for everybody and an annual rental 
paid out by the druggist. In some few places this practice still 
remains that the telephone of one company has a slot machine 
and the telephone of the other company is free, i. e., it is free 
to the public but not free to the druggist, because he pays for it. 

Some who have not investigated the practice elsewhere seem 
to think they would lose business if they do away with their free 
telephones. It has been demonstrated again and again that this 
is not the case. The drug store is the natural public telephone 
station and the public is willing to pay for good accommodations 
and good service. No one ever thanked us for the privilege of 
standing in line behind our hard worked telephones while the 
free lunch fiends gradually get out of the way one by one. 
In fact, all we got was the reverse of thanks. 

Druggists who have two telephones and are operating both 
with slot machines are not only giving the public better accom- 
modation, for which they get thanks and pay, but they are get- 
ting good telephone service for themselves and proper pay for 
the space afforded and service rendered. This is no experiment, 
but the experience of years has shown that there is every reason 
for emancipating the drug store telephone from the free lunch 
rut. There is no reason for going ahead in the old way. It 
is in the hands of the druggist to accomplish this themselves. 

The Telephone Committee of the N. A. R. D. has been preach- 
ing this for years. One by one the big cities have fallen in line 
and telephones represent a big profit to the drug interests instead 
of a big expense. Hundreds of delegates to our conventions have 
testified to this. Thousands in the trade all over the country are 
daily testifying to it by their use Generally our trade is not 
backward in protecting itself against loss or imposition, espe- 
cially where no good comes from it. Why there can be any 
substantial number who prefer to pay out their good money for 
telephone service, which they themselves make bad by attempting 
to give it away, is one of the things which seems past finding 
out. 

Yours for profit and comfort, 
W. Bodemann, 
Chairman N. A. R. D. Telephone Committee. 



Drug Stains and Their Removal. 

Not infrequently the advice of the pharmacist is asked con- 
cerning the best method of removing spots on the hands or on 
linen from some medicine which he has dispensed Directions 
for the removal of stains from some of the commoner drugs 
are given in "Das Rezept" (quoted in Vierteljahreschrift fur 
Praktische Pharmazie, 1909, part I). Iodine stains will disap- 
pear when treated with ammonia water or moistened with so- 
dium thiosulphate solution and then washed out with water. 
Silver nitrate spots may be removed quickly although not 
altogether without danger by the use of potassium cyanide 
solution. It may be done less easily, though quite as thoroughly 
with potassium iodide solution, which changes the silver to the 
white silver iodide, which may then be removed with thiosul- 
phate solution. A third reagent, which is effective in removing 
silver nitrate stains from the skin, consists of 2 drachms each 
of corrosive sublimate and ammonium chloride in 2 l /2 oz. of dis- 
tilled water. 

Chrysarobin stains are best removed by the aid of benzin. 
though chloroform or absolute alcohol will also answer the pur- 
pose. Warming the solvent increases its effectiveness. Resorcin 
spots yield to a dilute solution of citric acid. For the yellow 
spots of picric acid a solution of some alkaline sulphide, as 
potassium sulphide, is applied for about a minute, after which 
the fabric is thoroughly washed with soap and water. Fresh 
picric acid stains may be covered with a thin paste of mag- 
nesium carbonate and water, which after standing a few minutes 
is thoroughly rubbed in with the finger. Pyrogallol causes a 
stain which it is hopeless to try and remove after a certain 
length of time. Fresh stains may be removed or rendered much 
less noticeable by making use of the principle that pyrogallol 
forms with ferro-sulphate solutions a deep blue compound which 



1 1 



3° 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



may be decolorized with oxalic acid. The ferro-sulphate solu- 
tion is applied warm in 5 to 10 percent, strength, and is allowed 
to remain until the stain has assumed a deep blackish blue color. 
It is then washed off with water and the remaining stain is 
treated with oxalic acid. The process may be repeated if neces- 
sary. For spots due to aniline dyes strong soap spirits is said 
to act quickly and surely. 



The Treatment of Permanganate Poisoning. 

Dr. J. C. Attix, in a paper on Toxicology for the Pharma- 
cist, read before the December meeting of the Scientific Section 
of the Philadelphia Branch of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, paid particular attention to the treatment of cases 
of permanganate poisoning, recommending the use of sulphurous 
acid in dilute solution in large quantities. Where this is not 
obtainable, solution of sodium sulphite, of sodium thiosulphate 
or of ferrous sulphate, diluted, and of hydrogen peroxide, were 
recommended. Dr. Attix said that oxalic acid should not be 
administered unless it is definitely known how much perman- 
ganate has been taken, in which case the exact molecular pro- 
portion required should be given, since oxalic acid itself is just 
as poisonous as the permanganate. 



Ambergris. 

J. Y. Buchanan, F. R. S., in the course of an interesting article 
in Nature on the Oceanographical Museum at Monaco, mentions 
the skeleton of a cachalot, and says : 

"A healthy cachalot is valued for the spermaceti, or wax, 
which is contained in its head, and a sick one is still more val- 
ued for the ambergris which it may contain. This curious sub- 
stance, which has at all times been so highly esteemed in phar- 
macy and perfumery, forms the subject of a very interesting Ac- 
count of Ambergris' by Dr. Schweidawer, which was read before 
the Royal Society on February 13, 1783, and published in the 
Philosophical Transactions, vol. lxxiii, p. 220. From his inves- 
tigations it appears that ambergris is a byproduct of an inflamma- 
tion of the intestine, which has probably been started by the 
'beaks' of the cephalopods which it has swallowed, for these are 
the invariable and characteristic ingredients of all genuine am- 
bergris. He further states that the whalers are convinced that 
the cachalot feeds only on squids, which, when unmutilated, must 
be of great size." 

To this we may add, says the Chemist and Druggist, that a 
few years later, January 17, 1791, a committee of the Privy Coun- 
cil for Trade and Foreign Plantations reported to Sir Joseph 
Banks, Bart., President of the Royal Society, regarding a piece 
of ambergris weighing 362 ounces, found by Captain Coffin in 
the body of "a female spermaceti whale taken on the coast of 
Guinea." The captain and Mr. Champion were requested to at- 
tend before their lordships of the Privy Council, and they were 
questioned in regard to the origin of ambergris. Mr. Champion 
informed their lordships that the ambergris had been found in a 
cow-fish, and they saw it come out of the fundament of the whale 
as they cut up the blubber. The following questions and answers 
then reported are of interest: 

Q.: In what part of the whale did you find the remainder? — 
A. : Some more was in the same passage, and the rest was con- 
tained in a bag a little below the passage and communicating 
with it. 

Q. : Did the whale appear to be in health? — A.: No, she did 
not. She seemed sickly, had no flesh on her bones, and was 
very old, as appears by the teeth, two of which I have. Though 
she was about thirty-five feet long she did not produce above one 
ton and a half of oil. A fish of the same size in good health 
would have produced two tons and a half. 

Q. : Have you observed the food that whales generally feed 
on ? — A. : The spermaceti whale feeds, as I believe, almost wholly 
upon a fish called squids. I have often seen a whale, when dying, 
bring up a quantity of squid — sometimes whole, and sometimes 
pieces of it. The bills of the squid [some of which Mr. Coffin 
produced] were found, some in the inside and some on the out- 
side of the ambergris, sticking to it. 



Q. : Did you ever find any ambergris floating on the sea? — 
A. : I never did, but others frequently have. 

Mr. Champion was also questioned and stated that ambergris 
had lately sold at $5 an ounce. The piece of 362 ounces troy 
found by him had been sold at $4 an ounce by a broker, who 
told Mr. Champion that his principal, who purchased about half, 
had bought it for export to Germany, Turkey and France. The 
other half was purchased by druggists in London. 



An Apparatus for Keeping Lime Water. 

Bulletin No. 150 of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment 
Station of the State University, published from Lexington, is a 
treatise on the preservation of drugs by Linwood A. Brown, drug 
chemist of the food and drug division. It contains the informa- 
tion regarding the preservation of drugs that is needed by the 

pharmacists of the state 
' if they would avoid any 
infraction of the Ken- 
tucky food and drugs 
act of March 13, 1908. 
Notes on the keeping 
properties of crude 
drugs, chemicals and 
preparations, together 
with advice and prac- 
tical hints on storage, 
are given, and the 
treatise on the whole is 
one tnat should be wel- 
comed as an important 
contribution to the sub- 
ject of the deterioration 
and preservation of 
drugs As an example 
of the practical char- 
acter of the Bulletin 
we reproduce a cut of 
an apparatus for keep- 
lime water which is fig- 
ured in the text. 

Concerning lime wa- 
ter and its preservation 
it is noted that lime wa- 
ter soon loses strength by the absorption of carbon dioxide from 
the air. calcicum carbonate being thereby formed and precipi- 
tated. Lime water should not be kept in too warm a place, as 
calcium hydroxide is more soluble in cold than in warm water; 
for example, a saturated solution of calcium hydroxide at 25 0 
C. (77° F.) contains about 0.14 percent., while at 15 0 C. (59 0 
F.) it will contain about 0.17 percent. 

In the keeping of lime water it is suggested to make up 
quantities of ten gallon lots or more. Then take a bottle or 
carboy that will hold, say, five gallons, and place it on a shelf 
of suitable height, and arrange it as shown in the accompanying 
diagram. It would be well to have two bottles of this size; one 
for use in the preparation of the solution and the other to con- 
tain the finished product. Allow the undissolved calcium hydrate 
to settle before changing bottles and connecting up with syphon. 
The turned up end of tube (see diagram) prevents any disturb- 
ance of the sediment when siphoning off the lime water. The 
tubing can be bent to any angle by heating to redness in gas 
or alcohol flame, and the carbon dioxide trap can be made out 
of an ordinary wide mouth bottle, partly filled with a strong so- 
lution of sodium hydroxide, or soda lime may be used. After 
filling outlet tube by suction the liquid in the bottle may be 
siphoned out as wanted by opening stop cock at the lower end 
of outlet tube. The rubber joint prevents breakage of tube, by 
rendering it less rigid. 

Lime water may be kept for months in this way, without 
change, it kept in a cool place. 




Apparatus for keeping lime water. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



3i 



Notes V Queries % /* Answers 



Liniment for Animals. — S. E. A. — The compound named by 
you is understood to have the following composition: 



Pulverized camphor 5v 

Poppy seed oil Bxiv 

Stronger ammonia water 3'v 

Tincture of arnica 3>'ss 

Oil of rosemary 5iii 

Carbolic acid 5iii 

M. 



Physicians' Prescriptions and the Pharmacy Law. — G. H. 

K. writes : "In section 198 of the pharmacy law it is prescribed 
that 'it shall be unlawful for any person to sell or furnish any 
of the poisons named in the schedules hereinafter set forth, etc' 
Now, how does this section apply to physicians' prescriptions? 
For instance, a prescription is handed in calling for a quantity 
of strychnine, the single dose of which would be 1/30 grain. 
Must a poison label be affixed to this prescription, and must the 
label state the quantity of strychnine contained in the mixture?" 

Our querist must have consulted an old copy of the phar- 
macy law, as he does not give the correct number of the sched- 
ule pertaining to the sale of poisons. Section 238 of the phar- 
macy law of June 8, 1910, is explicit on this point, stating that 
"the provision of this paragraph [poison schedules; register; 
opium and other prescriptions] do not apply to the dispensing of 
medicines or poisons on physicians' prescriptions." This, we 
think, sufficiently answers the inquiry of our correspondent. 

India Rubber Cement. — W. C. — A good formula for a 
cement to attach india rubber to wood is the following: 

India rubber %i'u 

Rosin 3 SS 

Shellac 3iiss 

Carbon disulphide q. s. 

Mix and make a solution of the desired consistence. 
"German Salve" and "Dutch Butter."— W. M. O. asks us 
to tell him where the names "German salve" and "Dutch butter," 
as applied to green soap, originated. Will some of" our readers 
who have information bearing on this subject please let us hear 
from them. 

That Emulsion Formula. — We are indebted to our esteemed 
friend, Captain John K. Williams, of Hartford, Conn., for sev- 
eral interesting notes bearing on pharmaceutical practice. In 
regard to the inquiry answered by Otto Raubenheimer, in the 
preceding issue, Captain Williams advises us to tell "J. A. G." 
to try the continental or "dry" method of emulsifying oils, say- 
ing that a mixture of balsam of fir, creosote carbonate, and eu- 
calyptol should be treated in that way. The difficulty with the 
prescription referred to lies in the density of the balsam of fir 
and creosote carbonate, which, however, may be overcome, as 
follows : Select a mortar large enough to hold the finished 
emulsion. Warm the mortar by setting it in very hot water. 
Heat the balsam and creosote carbonate together in a wide 
mouthed bottle immersed in hot water, the mixture being heated 
until it flows as readily as any oil, say santal, for instance ; add 
the eucalyptol and proceed as in the usual dry method, which is 
to put into the perfectly hot mortar one-half the quantity by 
weight of pulverized acacia relative to the oils. Mix with a 
pestle and add all at once one-half the quantity by weight of 
water, previously warmed, this figure referring to the combined 
weight of the balsam, oils, and acacia. Stir rapidly until a thick 
emulsion is formed as indicated by the change of color and by 
the crackling noise in the manipulation ; then dilute with water 
to the amount required and add the alcoholic ingredients lastly. 

Captain Williams adds : "This method is in constant use at 
my dispensing counter whenever oils, balsams, etc., enter aqueous 



prescriptions, however small the quantity and whether emulsifi- 
cation is directed by the piescriber or not. The emulsion is 
finished with a dozen whirls of the pestle. Essential oils, as those 
of wintergreen and turpentine (the most difficult of all) are 
easily emulsified in this way, but much more quickly if one adds 
25 percent, of castor oil, or any expressed oil thereto. In adding 
the latter it is necessary to maintain the proportions of oil, gum 
and water previously stated. 

"For making larger quantities of emulsions, as codliver oil, 
say, the ideal apparatus is the old fashioned farmer's earthen- 
ware churn, obtainable at any dealer in kitchenware. I would 
suggest the use of one with an oakwood dasher and handle, hold- 
ing about two gallons. These churns are cheap, easily cleaned 
and rapid in result. By their use the amount of gum acacia 
can be reduced one-half. I have used one for thirty years and 
can make V/ 2 gallons of perfectly white emulsion in five min- 
utes. I also use an emulsifier of the same kind made from tin, 
holding three pints for blending the rose water with the fats in 
making cold cream, and also to turn out ointment of zinc oxide 
smooth and fine while cooling." 

Recipes for Massage Creams.— W. L., who asks where he 
may obtain recipes for the manufacture of massage creams, dis- 
appearing skin creams, toilet waters and liquid shampoo mix- 
tures, is advised to consult the files of the American Druggist 
for the past year, where he will find numerous formulas of the 
kind desired. 

Glass Cleanser and Polisher.— J. S. W. writes : "As a con- 
stant reader of the American Druggist, I am prompted to ask 
you for the best formula for a glass cleanser and polisher. If 
you can supply the information I will greatly appreciate it." 

The cleansing of glass surfaces, such as the windows of drug 
stores, is often a more intricate problem than it appears to the 
lay mind. The first thing to be taken into consideration is the 
removal of the sooty and greasy deposit from the combustion of 
kerosene, or coal gas. To effect this a fairly concentrated solu- 
tion of ammonia water is generally the best, but its application 
must be followed by a swabbing with some dilute acid, such as 
acetic or hydrochloric. Those who have never employed this 
method of cleansing and polishing a glass surface will be aston- 
ished at the brilliancy which follows it. Of course the stereo- 
typed method is to rub the surface with chalk and water and 
plenty of elbow grease, and then others pin their faith to 
chamois skin and plain water applied equally dexterously and 
forcibly 

Many of the published formulas for compounds for cleansing 
glass are amateurish, as, for instance, the following: 



Prepared chalk lb. vi 

Pulverized talcum lb. is- 

Calcium phosphate lb. ii 5iv 

Soap bark lb. ii 3iv 

Ammonium carbonate 3xviii 

Rose pink % v \ 



Mix the ingredients in fine powder and sift through muslin. 
Then mix with soft water to the consistence of cream and apply 
to the glass by means of a soft rag or sponge; allow it to dry 
on, wipe off with a cloth and polish with chamois. 

The Action of the Saline Purgatives has been investigated 
by Tyrode by means of studies carried out upon an isolated loop 
of intestine which was maintained in a nutritive fluid. He 
found that sodium sulphate, sodium phosphate and magnesium 
sulphate produced their characteristic action upon peristalsis by 
means of a local reflex, the neuro-muscular mechanism of which 
was situated within the intestinal wall, and which was called 



13 



32 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



into action by the stimulation of the mucous membrane. The 
action was a specific result of the chemical composition of the 
salts, and while he admitted the influence, through the laws of 
osmosis, of the presence of a hypertonic fluid within the lumen 
of the gut, he believed that this was not essential to the action 
of the salts. — Arch, intern, de pharmacodynam., No. 344, 191 0, 
through Les Nouveaux Remedes, No. 23, 1910. 

Label Paste. — In reply to the inquiry of C. D. S., Captain 
John K. Williams kindly sends the following formula for an in- 



expensive, quickly made paste : 

Pastry flour 5 vm 

Pulverized alum 5i 

Sodium borate 5i 

Boric acid gr. xv 

Salicylic acid gr. xv 

Oil of sassafras gtt. xx 

Mix in a suitable earthenware or glazed dish and add all at 
once : 

Water Sviii 

Concentrated acetic acid 3> 

Whip smooth with a wooden paddle; set over a hot fire and 
add all at once : 

Boiling water Oi 

Stir constantly until the paste thickens and changes color 
slightly, which indicates the breaking down of the starch glob- 



ules; remove to a crock and when wanted reduce to proper con- 
sistence with boiling water (about one part of paste to two parts 
of water, added slowly, and whipping in smoothly). A stock 
paste made in this way keeps indefinitely and does not become 
watery by age. 

Blount's Oil of Tar. — An inquiry for the name and ad- 
dress of the manufacturer of Blount's Oil of Tar reaches us 
from a firm of exporters and if any of our readers should supply 
the address our querist would be grateful. 

A Non-Greasy Antiseptic Ointment. — It has been pointed 
out by Monteil (Bull. gen. de therap.) that antipyrine, resorcin, 
and terpin hydrate, when heated together at a suitable tempera- 
ture, form a product of an oily consistency, which if triturated 
with glycerin produces a mixture exactly resembling cold cream 
in consistency and appearance. A sample made in our labora- 
tory (The Prescriber) showed a beautiful product, perfectly 
homogeneous, which rubbed into the skin like an easily absorbed 
ointment. It has an antiseptic and sedative action, is non-caustic 
and can be easily washed off the skin with water. The following 



is the formula : 

Antipyrine Gm. 18.8 

Resorcin Gm. 11.0 

Terpin hydrate Gm. 18.0 

Heat together on an oil bath to 257° F., and add : 

Glycerin (previously warmed) Gm. 100.0 

and triturate till cold. 



The Alkaloid Distribution and Formation in the Opium 
Poppy. — After a comprehensive study of the formation and oc- 
currence of the various alkaloids in the Papaver somniferum, 
Kerbosch draws the following conclusions : Distinct traces of 
narcotine are found in seeds which have germinated but three 
days. The order in which the alkaloids are found in the plant 
is as follows: Narcotine, codeine, morphine, papacerine, the- 
baine. The first four mentioned may be demonstrated in plants 
no more than 5 to 7 Cm. in height. Narcotine, papaverine, co- 
deine and morphine are found in all the organs of the blos- 
soming plant, with the exception of the stamens. The composi- 
tion of the sap varies in different parts of the plant. The ripe 
plant contains, in all its organs, narcotine, codeine and mor- 
phine. Seeds which are germinating in nitrogen free soil pro- 
duce narcotine, although narcotine is a product of albumin. 
Narcotine is found in greater abundance in the juice of the 
buds than in the unripe seed capsules. 

Tests for Atoxyl. — To differentiate atoxyl from other or- 
ganic combinations of arsenic, as the compounds with aniline 
bases, Fiori (Bull. chim. farm., No. 3. 1010, through Les Nou- 



veaux Remedes, No. 23, 1910) employs calcium chloride and 
corrosive sublimate. On adding several drops of a solution of 
calcium chloride to a cold solution of atoxyl, there appears a 
beautiful orange red color, and with an excess of the reagent 
a canary yellow precipitate. Sodium methylarsenate and sodium 
cacodylate exhibit no color changes with this reagent, while 
acetanilide gives an olive green color. One may also distin- 
guish atoxyl from the products with which it may be com- 
pounded or adulterated by the fact that it gives with corrosive 
sublimate a white precipitate soluble in hydrochloric acid or am- 
monia, while acetaldehyde and the cacodylate are not precip- 
itated. Acetanilide is not precipitated by a solution of silver 
nitrate, while the three other substances give a white precipitate, 
which is soluble in ammonia. 

Papaverine and Cryptopine. — The discoverer of papaver- 
ine, G. Merck, described as a characteristic reaction of the alka- 
loid the development of a deep blue violet color with cold sul- 
phuric acid. Later, Hesse discovered that this reaction was not 
due to the papaverine but to the presence of another alkaloid, 
papaveramine, C^HasNOa, as an impurity. The synthetic papaver- 
ine does not show a single one of the supposedly characteristic 
color reactions, and Ame Pictet and C. H. Kramers (Ber. d. d. 
Chem. Ges., 1910, 43, 1329) now state that these reactions are 
in reality due to the accidental presence of quite another alka- 
loid, cryptopine, C2iH 23 N0 6 . From 800 Gm. of papaverine they 
were able to isolate about 30 Gm. of this rare alkaloid. Crypto- 
pine crystallizes out of alcohol in short, transparent prisms hav- 
ing a fusing point of 218 degrees C. The hydrochloride is easily 
soluble in water, the chloride dissolves with difficulty. The bi- 
chromate forms fine, yellow prisms easily soluble in water. 
Cryptopine is a saturated basic substance, which does not react 
with nascent hydrogen, and contains two methoxyls. With pure 
concentrated sulphuric acid it gives a dark blue violet color. It 
also reacts positively with the reagents of Erdmann, Frohde, 
Mandelin and Labat, with all of which pure papaverine is nega- 
tive. The latter is positive with the color reactions of Lafons 
and Marquis only. 

Grindelia Robusta. — A study of Grindelia Robusta by J. 
Dore, of Toulouse, is reviewed in a recent number of the Phar- 
mazeutische Post (No. 67, 1910). Dore's work covers the lit- 
erature concerning this drug and considers the subject from four 
standpoints : botanical, chemical, pharmacological and clinical. 
He states that the drug is seldom obtainable in the pure state, 
usually being mixed with other varieties of Grindelia, particu- 
larly Grindelia squarrosa and Grindelia camporum. The morphol- 
ogy of the plant has been investigated thoroughly and is agreed 
upon, but there is still some controversy concerning its chem- 
istry. The author has demonstrated two saponinlike glucosides, 
after Schneegan's method, as well as alkaloids. The alkaloid 
was recognized in the following way: 2 Kgm. of the drug were 
treated with alcohol, and the extract evaporated. The residue 
was washed free from pigments and resins by means of chloro- 
form, taken up with water and after the addition of an alkali 
was again shaken out with chloroform. The residue of the 
chloroform extract was purified in the ordinary manner and gave 
the alkaloids as a brown mass which was easily soluble in water 
and reacted with potassium iodide and potassium bismuth iodide. 
The drug is used as powder, fluidextract, dry extract, and tinc- 
ture, and is toxic in large doses, sometimes even proving fatal. 
As recent clinical observations show, it may be used in certain 
diseases of the respiratory tract, as ashthma. bronchitis, whoop- 
ing cough, and emphysema, and in bladder trouble. The author 
does not refer to the use of the fluid extract as a wash in the 
treatment of rhus poisoning. This had some vogue, particularly 
among eclectic physicians, some years ago. 

The Odor of Morphine Salts. — C. Reichard (Pharm. Prax- 
is, 1910, 151, through Pharm. Jour., Nov. 5, 1910) has noticed 
that a s percent, solution of morphine hydrochloride is heated 
on a water bath, a peculiar odor is disengaged at 86 or 104 0 F., 
which slightly resembles that of musk. On cooling the odor dis- 



14 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



33 



appears almost completely, but it may be revived at will by heat- 
ing. The intensity of the odor is directly proportionate to the 
concentration of the morphine solution. No odor is obtained 
with the pure base, or with that containing one molecule of 
crystallization. Phenanthrene, from which alkaloids of the mor- 
phine group are derived, itself possesses a very characteristic 
odor, which is still more pronounced when heated with water, 
and on cooling disappears almost completely. Phenanthrene- 
quinone gives no odor either in the cold or when heated in the 
vapor of water. 

Applications for Toothache. — In the Nord medicale for 
September i, 1910 (New York Medical Journal, October 8, 1910), 
a number of dental formulas are published, most of which are 
intended' for the relief of odontalgia. The necessity of calming 
the pain before proceeding with measures to overcome special 
conditions is referred to. The treatment of symptoms must, of 
course, vary according to the cause of pain. If the pain is due 
to periostitis, soothing antiseptic mouth washes should be em- 
ployed containing about one grain of chloral in each drachm; 
either mucilage of sassafras, or elm; decoction of marshmallow 
or poppy heads may be used as the base or vehicle. Good results 
are also obtained by painting the gums night and morning with 
one or other of the following mixtures : 

I. 

Tincture of iodine. / . . 

Tincture of aconite. ) aa 01153 

M. 

II. 

Tincture of iodine 5i 

Tincture of aconite 3i 

Crystalline synthetic guaiacol 3ss 

M. 

III. 

Tincture of iodine 3iss 

Tincture of aconite 3iss 

Chloroform 3i 

M. 

In most cases the pain has its origin in caries of the teeth 
with pulpitis. It is important to first clean out the cavity as com- 
pletely as possible and then apply one of either of the following 
solutions on a pledget of cotton; 

I. 

Tincture of benzoin : 3iiss 

Oil of cloves Tilxlv 

M. 

II. 

Solution of formaldehyde, U. S. P 3iiss 

Oil of geranium nT,xxx 

M. 

III. 

Chloroform : 3iiss 

Creosote 3iiss 

Tincture of opium 3iiss 

Tincture of benzoin %i 

M. 

IV. 

Chloral hydrate gr. Ixxv 

Cocaine hydrochloride gr. xv 

Pulverized camphor gr. Ixxv 

Alcohol gtt. x 

M. 

V. 

Tincture of benzoin 3iss 

Chloroform 3i 

Carbolic acid, crystals gr. xxx 

M. 

Or the cavity may be filled with a paste of the following com- 
position : 

Cocaine hydrochloride gr. 1/7 

Morphine hydrochloride gr. 1/7 

Oil of cloves, sufficient to make a paste. 

M. 

The Excretion of Drugs in the milk was the subject of 
careful investigation by Koldewijn (Arch, der Pharrn., Novem- 
ber 26, iqio). The substances were administered to cows by 



hypodermic injections or with the food, and the milk of the 
cows was tested for the presence of these substances. In the 
case of lithium, quinine and urotropine the milk was found tP 
contain them, but negative results were obtained with mercury, 
antimony, bismuth, zinc, morphine and aspirin. Experiments on 
goats gave positive results with lead and alcohol and negative 
with cystisin, phenolphthalein and fluorescein. 

The Acidity of Hydrogen Dioxide Solutions is discussed 
by Linwood A. Brown (Journal of Industrial and Engineering 
Chemistry, 1910, II, p. 377; through American Journal of Phar- 
macy, December, 1910), who states that the United States Phar- 
macopoeia test for free acid does not give correct results. He 
reports a number of experiments and concludes that acetanilide 
acts the part of a free acid and seriously interferes with secur- 
ing accurate results. Direct titration in the cold was found to 
be satisfactory and gave results sufficiently accurate for all prac- 
tical purposes. 



Letters to the Editor. 



Standards for Unofficial Drugs. 

To the Editor: 

Sir, — The Committee on Standards for Unofficial Drugs and 
Chemical Products are engaged in formulating standards for a 
number of articles not now recognized by the United States 
Pharmacopoeia. Many of the articles which they are standard- 
izing will, no doubt, be admitted into the revised edition of the 
National Formulary, and if the standards as promulgated by this 
committee are adopted in that revision, then they will become the 
legal standards of the country. 

It has been suggested that a list of the monographs immedi- 
ately under consideration should be published in the pharmaceu- 
tical journals so that the importers, manufacturers and dealers 
who are interested will feel at liberty to make suggestions as to 
the proper standards to be adopted. It is the desire of the 
committee to be absolutely fair and accurate, as far as possible, 
in our work, and we welcome any suggestions that may be of- 
fered. The following list of titles covers only those on which 
monographs are now before the committee ; 



Absinthium 
Aconite leaves 
Adonis 

Albumen, dried blood 
Albumen, dried egg 
Althea leaves 
Ammonium hypophosphite 
Angelica root 
Angelica seed 
Areca 

Arnica root 
Barium peroxide 
lioldo leaf 

Bromauric ncid (commercial gold 

tribromide) 
Buckthorn berries 
Cacao (cocoa) 
Cactus grandiflorus 
Calamine 

Calcium glycerophosphate 

Calcium peroxide 

Canella alba 

Cascarilla 

Caulophyllum 

Celery seed 

Centaury 

Coal tar 

Cocculus indicus 
Condurango 



Coto bark 
Cudbear 

Diacetyl morphine 

Diacetyl morphine hydrochloride 

Dextrin, white 

Dextrin, yellow 

Euphorbia pilulifera 

Foenugreek 

Formic acid 

Formic acid, concentrated 

Kava kava 

Kieselguhr 

Kola 

Lead carbonate 

Oil, cardamom 

Phenolphthalein 

Poppy capsules 

Potassium glycerophosphate 

Quince seed 

Red sum, eucalyptus kino 

Rennin 

Saffron 

Sherry wine 

Strontium arsenite 

Thuja (arbor vita:) 

Tonka bean 

Venice turpentine 

White nine bark 

Zinc peroxide 



It is the intent to publish, from time to time, supplemental 
lists as new articles are taken up for standardization. In order 
to give the desired publicity to our work we respectfully request 
the pharmaceutical press to give sufficient space to present this 
matter and request that any suggestions as to the proper stand- 
ards to be adopted should be sent to the undersigned. 

George M. Beringer, 

Chairman. 

Camden, N. J., 501 Federal street. 



15 



34 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



ADVERTISING v BUSINESS v ACCOUNTING 



Subscribers are cordially Invited to make Inquiries of this department and to communicate information which they may 

possess regarding the subjects under discussion. 



MISCELLANEOUS WINTER ADS. 

By Frank Farrington, 

Delhi. N. Y. 

With the coming of midwinter there is often a let up in the 
quality of the retailer's advertising unless he is one of the 




If you have been troubled 
with chapped or rough skin, you 
should at or.ee procure a ten 
cent trial size bottle of Benzoine 
Cream. 

It is so much different than 
ordinary lotions. You will al- 
ways use it after one trial. 

10c, 25c and 50c Bottle. 



The Potters Drug Store 

4fft and Market SI. 



NOT A CHAP 

Several cold, blustering months ai 
before us when the skin is liable t 
become roughened anil inflamed b 
the cold winds unless some good pre 
tecting lotion is used. Our 

ALMOND CREAM 

Is the best preparation yon can us« 
It is dainty, being neither greasy o 
sticky and is quickly absorbed by tli 
skin, leaving it soft, clear and yelvetj 
It has protecting qualities found ii 
no other lotion and preserves the com 
plexion, no matter how trying 1 1 1 < 
•weather. Price, 25 cents. 

DAN WILCOX 

DRUGGIST 
104 West Main Street 



modern method merchants who know no dull seasons and make 
people buy of them every month in the year. 

There is a good demand at this season for lotions to prevent 
the hands and face from roughening and chapping. 

We show samples of the lotion ads of three different drug 
stores which push their own individual preparations. These are 



Cold Weather 

Will not pinch half so hard if 
you will call at our Model 
Fountain and get a Piping Hot 
drink. We serve the best of ev- 
erything hot or cold. 



Fink's 
Theater Pharmacy 

Landers Theatre Bldg. 




'candies 

'MADE LAST N16KVS 



Chapped Hands 

and Lips 

Every body is froaWcd 
with chapped or rough hands 
now. 

Have you ever Iried 
SPANISH CREAM 

Your trouble is forgotten 
in one night, 



C. H. Dalrymple 

Druggist 

Phones 69 and 2173 
N. W. Cor. Square. 



all pretty good ads, though the Dalrymple ad lacks any price. 
This one also ought to have the name of the cream displayed 



a little more to get the best effect. The originals were single 
column wide, 2% inches. 

Hot Soda Time. 

This is the time for the hot soda man to bear on hardest on 
his part of the business. People have leisure now after the 
holiday rush is past to drop in and buy hot drinks and -hundreds 
of them who do not do it lack only a little encouragement. 
They need to be educated. The sentiment of the Fink's phar- 
macy ad for hot soda touches the spot and if the writer of it 
can make the people think that hot soda will help to pass the 
winter away with greater comfort, his success is assured. 

The "Get a Gallon" bit of advertisement which we cut from 
a half page space of the Schrouder & Stonehouse drug store of 
Grand Rapids, Mich., shows a good use to make of the surplus 
of gallon jugs that accumulates in the cellar of many stores dur- 
ing the soda season. Of course these goods advertised do not 
need to be kept already put up in gallons, but the use of such 
advertising would have a tendency to encourage the buying of 
those goods in larger quantities, thus making a greater use of 
them and netting in the end more money for the druggist sharp 
enough to get the business. 



GET A GALLON 



(Price includes new jug.) 



One gallon jug Norwegian Cod 
Liver Oil $1.67 

One gallon jug finest sweet oil. $1 00 

One gallon jug pure Glycerine. $2.95 

One gallon jug pure Sherry 
Wine $1.00 

One gallon jug pure Italian 
Olive Oil $3.67 

One gallon can California Olive 
Oil $3.25 

One gallon jug Aqua Am- 
monia 50c 



One gallon jug Best Witch 
Hazel 93c 

One gallon jug pure cold 
pressed Castor Oil $i-3> 

One gallon jug Benzine for 
cleaning 25c 

One gallon jug pure Holland 
Gin (our own importation) . $5.00 

One gallon jug extract of Va- 
nilla Beans $8.00 

One gallon jug Wood Alcohol. 83c 

One gallon jug Denatured Al- 
cohol K.«c 



The Moore's Drug Store ad shows something a little dif- 
ferent in the way of catch phrase, store name, or whatever you 
may call it. This is a St. Johns, New Brunswick store. Whether 

THE : OLIVE : OIL : STORE 



Abbey's Salt 

Beecham's Pills 

Baby's Own Soap 

Chase's Ointment 

Mathieu's Syrup 

Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 

Telephone Orders Promptly Sent 



Moore's Drug Store 

ios BRUSSELS STREET. 
Tel. Main 47. Cor. Richmond. 

THE : OLIVE : OIL : STORE 

this "Olive Oil Store" phrase is run continually and indefinitely 
or not I do not know, but it seems as if it might be a good 
thing for a while, then to be replaced with something different. 
Why shouldn't a drug store be a "Witch Hazel Drug Store" 
or a "Peppermint Drug Store" as well as the "Red Front Drug 
Store" or the "Oak Tree Drug Store," or the "Red Apple Drug 
Store," and those latter appellations are not at all out of the 



16 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



39 



way? The rest of the ad has little excuse for existence. A list 
of half a dozen patent medicines without even prices or uses 
appended is pretty poor advertising. 



ACCOUNTING. 

IX. -BORROWING FROM THE BANK. 




"There's just one drug M> 
store where I know I will yf/ 
get exactly what I ask 




51 When you hear that remark you can 
take it for granted the speaker means us. 
^Whatever you want from any drug store 
can be had here— if we haven't got it we 
will get it for you. There's never a fear 
of disappointment. You get what you 
ask for or what your doctor wants you 
to have, or you get nothing— you never 
get "something just as good" here, be- 
cause we only have one best. 
*IDoes not this assurance warrant your 
trading here? We think so. 



RIPLEY'S 

W QUALITY DRUG STORE 

^RIPLEY'S COLD TABLETS - - - 25c 

One of the best ads of the policy of a drug store that has 
come our way in some time is that of "Ripley's Quality Drug 
Store" of Taunton, Mass. This ad has a distinctive border 
seasonable for December and it puts the matter involved in an 
interesting way and it is set up in readable and attractive type. 
The original was 4^4 inches wide. 

It is not every advertiser that possesses the ability to get a 
good advertisement set up in such a way that it will be as good 
in type as it was in typewriter. Many a well written ad is 
spoiled in the setting of the type and in the arrangement of 
the display. It pays any advertiser to know something about 
typography. 



The Finishing Touch. 

Most anybody can do business fairly well. 

Many men can do business very well. 

A few men can do business superbly well. 

But the man who not only does his work superbly well, but 
adds to it a last touch of personality through a great zeal, pa- 
tience and perseverance, making it peculiar, unique, individual, 
distinct and unforgettable is an artist. And this applies to all 
and every field of human endeavor — managing a hotel, a bank, a 
factory— writing, speaking, modeling, painting. It is that last 
undefinable touch that counts; the last three seconds he knocks 
off the record that proves the man a genius. — Fra Elbertus. 



Money Made by Borrowing to Take Cash Discounts— A Bank 
Credit as a Valuable Asset* 



By Frank E. Goodwin. 

The retail druggist who is on good terms with his local 
banker is twice blessed. His credit is such that he can borrow 
from the funds of the bank when necessity or convenience 
arises; and the man whose credit v/ill pass muster at the local 
bank is a good enough risk for the wholesaler. 

The town banker becomes a silent partner of the successful 
business man. He can and does assist the merchant in making 
money, if his help is obtained when the taking of cash dis- 
counts means that money must be borrowed. 

Some druggists prefer to let their discounts lapse rather 
than to enlist the good offices of the local banker when the 
crucial time arrives. But such men do not understand the profit 
to them in borrowing cash in order to take the discount. 

In an effort to convince such retailers let us state a hypotheti- 
cal case of what a druggist can gain by borrowing to take his 
cash discount, and what he loses if he does not pay at its last 
or net maturity. 

Brown is a druggist who bought a small bill of goods, the 
face value of which is $100. The terms were net 90 days, with 
2 percent, per month interest after that date. Five percent, 
cash discount is offered if paid in 30 days from date. The in- 
voice bears date June 1 ; last discount date is July 1, and the 
bill comes to maturity on September 1. On November 1 the 
druggist pays the bill, with penalty attached. How much has 
he lost on the transaction? 

If he had on deposit in the bank, or in his cash register, 
sufficient funds to have taken advantage of the cash discount, 
this would have amounted to $5. Two months' interest as pen- 
alty from September 1 to November 1, was $4, or $9 altogether. 
This seemingly insignificant sum is a net profit at 5 percent, on 
goods costing, delivered, $180. 

If he did not have the money on hand by which to accept the 
liberal terms of discount, he could, if his banking credit was 
good, have borrowed $100 from his banker for three months at 
8 percent, a year interest, or $2. This would have been a net 
saving to him of $7, or a net profit of 5 percent, on the delivered 
cost of goods amounting to $135. 

The average cost of stocks sold at retail is slightly in ex- 
cess of $24,000 annually, the same basis of figures being used 
that were named in a previous chapter of this department. It 
is hardly likely that as high as 5 percent, cash discount could 
be obtained on every purchase, but if it could it would amount 
to $1,200. It is known, however, to be close to that figure, and 
the druggist who does an average retail business, and makes the 
most of his cash discount offers, can make a net saving of $1,000 
a year. If he were to let his discounts lapse and force the ex- 
treme interest penalties upon his business, the careless dealer, 
who did an average retail business of $32,000 gross, would suf- 
fer a net loss in excess of $1,800 a year. 

Do Not Sacrifice Profits. 

Having shown the possibilities of making money through ac- 
cepting the cash discounts offered, the writer would warn the 
readers not to deviate one iota from the retail prices, which 
are based upon the delivered cost of the goods, freight, express 
and delivery added, and the selling cost, to which has been also 
added the desired net profit. 

The druggist who anticipates his cash discount and deducts 
it from his selling prices, so that he may be able to sell goods 
cheap, is making a greater mistake than is the man who does not 
take his discounts at all. 

The cash discount is a reward for good business ability. If 
the druggist has prospered, conserved his resources, built up his 



40 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



credit, and otherwise demeaned himself as a live business man 
should, the discount is offered him in return for the money he 
possesses or can obtain, and for the opportunity of lessening the 
risk from loss. It is a privilege accorded to no man who is not 
successful to the end where money is concerned. 

No man in trade should use his cash discounts in striving to 
crush his competitor through being able to name lower prices. 

For a man to use his cash discounts to defeat and down a 
weaker competitor by mere force of financial ability, depending 
upon an increase in profits when his fellow man shall have suc- 
cumbed and been forced out of the race, is taking an unfair ad- 
vantage which is not his by right. Such a man does not de- 
serve to prosper, and sooner or later other and more strenu- 
ous competition will set up beside him, to harass and possibly 



or credit of the merchant beyond a point that he could well 
withstand. 

The writer's advice, based upon the examination and study 
of hundreds of retail businesses, is take advantage of every cash 
discount, which amounts to as much or more than money on 
deposit would bring. Consider that discount as a saving or 
profit to be applied to the surplus or reserve fund of the busi- 
ness, and rest secure in the fact that you are laying up stores 
for a rainy day. 

A Retail Druggist's Calendar. 

One of the most attractive calendars for 191 1 that has 
reached our desk comes from the Mayo Drug Company, of Co- 



Don 't forget the 
many pleasant even- 
ings in delightful 
company of your lady 
friends during the 
past year. Dull and 
lonesome the world 
would he indeed with- 
out them. A box of 
Huyler's would be a 
grateful courtesy and 
remembrance of 
pleasant evenings. 
Leave your card with 
us and let us deliver. 



Fairfield Ave. and 
Crosby and Cyrus, 
State street 

A bos of Huylers, 
tied with ribbons and a 
spray of Holly, deliver- 
ed early Xmas morning 
would make a neat little 
remembrance to your 
lady friends. A little 
courtesey for the pleas- 
ant evenings spent in 
delightful company 
during the past year. 
Leave your card with 
us, we will deliver it 
right. Cyrus Pharm- 
acy. Fairfield Ave. and 
Crosby & Cyrus State 
Street. 



A bed bug crawling on 
your children's clothes 
when away from home 
does not speak well of 
that home, but instead 
gives to your friends a 
lasting impression of 
neglect and carelessness 
in that home and is often 
whispered around 
among other friends of 
the family. Such un- 
pleasant comment could 
haveheen avoided if you 
had used Cyrus Presto 
Killer for Bedbugs. The 
cost is only 25 cents and 
would have effectually 
cleaned the bed 

. Sweetest wishes for a 
happy Yuletide with a 
box of Huylers would 
be a grateful courtesy 
to your lady friends for 
.the many pleasant 
evenings spent in de- 
lightful company dwr- 
ing the past year. Leave 
your card and, let us . 
deliver. Cyrus '"Phar- 
macy, Fairfield' Ave.,' 
and Crosby and Cyrus,, 
State Street. 



If a pain catches 
you unaware while 
you are working 
at your best put a 
Cyrus Plaster on 
the spot. The pain 
will quickly disap- 
pear and you will 
not loose your 
day's pay. Most 
of the men you 
can rely on wear a 
Cyrus Plaster and 
recommend it to 
their friends. 25 
cents, five for one 
dollar. 

Some people tolerate 
roaches and waterbugs 
in the kitchen, in vain 
belief that the rest of 
the family will not find 
it out. Perhaps they 
will not, but suppose 
that some day you 
would serve a roach in 
the pie: perhaps then 
you would wish that 
you had spent 20c for a 
box 'of Cyrus Roach 
Powder. 



Bus House is not a 
complimentary name to 
give to any home — still 
it is given — perhaps 
merited. Don't tolerate 
the roaches, bedbugs or 
any kind of bugs, we 
have the proper remedy 
and guarantee satisfac- 
tion. Presto Killer for 
Bedbugs, Cyrus Roach 
Powder for Roaches. 
The Cyrus Pharmacy, 
Fairfield Ave., corner 
Courtland St. 



A week's room rent 
would buy a lot of Pres- 
to Killer for Bedbugs. 
Suppose you had spent 
25c for a can of Presto 
Killer, how much would 
you have saved? Many 
roomers don't give the 
reason why they leave; 
Bedbugs is one of the 
reasons. No one can 
blame them. Is it worth 
the savins? 



A group of advertisements of a successful retailer, Carl O. Cyrus, Bridgeport, Conn. The originals were full newspaper column width. 



embarrass nim for the business sins he has committed against 
his brother. 

Besides, how can a man who anticipates his cash discounts, 
and deducts them from the purchase price of his goods, be abso- 
lutely sure that he can always meet them when the time comes 
for payment? 

Look back a couple of years, when the money panic hit the 
entire country. Then it was well nigh impossible to borrow 
money even in small amounts. A recurrence of such an event 
would force many a druggist to forego his discounts, and even 
to beg for an extension of time, with interest penalty attached. 
In such a case the anticipated and deducted cash discount would 
not only wipe out the net profit, but draw upon the reserve fund 



Iumbus, Miss. It measures about 24 inches high by 13 inches 
wide and, with the exception of a small portion at the bottom, 
which is occupied by monthly slips, the entire space is given up 
to a handsome reproduction in colors of a painting of the Indian 
girl Pocahontas, by Howard Chandler Christy. The recipients 
of this very artistic calendar should deem themselves most 
fortunate, and we doubt not that it will prove an excellent ad- 
vertisement for the Mayo Drug Company. 



More ads are spoiled through saying too much in them than 
by saying too little. When you have written what you want to 
say, cut out half of the words. Say it all in less space and with 
less unnecessary language. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 35 




OPPORTUNITIES OF 1911 

Some opportunities come but once, others are recurrent 
and in many cases are the best, as they involve no hazard and 
lead to certain competence. 

An opportunity every druggist will have all year is to spec- 
ify "Lilly". It is one of the recurrent type and carries many in- 
cident opportunities which make for the attainment of better 
professional standing and business independence. 

It is an opportunity to have your shelves stocked with pharma- 
ceuticals of the highest quality. 

To always get best discount, 40 per cent., on orders of any size; 

To order as current needs indicate without the handicap of quan- 
tity obligations or loss of discount; 

To keep a cleaner, better stock on the same investment, or 

To carry a stock well adjusted to the needs of your trade on less 
investment; 

To reduce your orders, accounts and worries by combining your 
pharmaceutical wants with your general drug order; 

To buy advantageously through the most convenient source of 
supply — your jobber; 

To have more of your profits showing in cash — less in dead stock; 
To work with a house which never competes but always co-operates 
with you for the pharmaceutical business in your locality. 

These opportunities are real, tangible and entirely within 
your reach. If grasped they will bring you peace of mind, ad- 
vantage in competition and success. 

Specify Lilly Pharmaceuticals on your drug orders to your 
jobber and realize the full measure of happiness and prosperity 
that the Lilly Policy holds for you in 1911. 

ELI LILLY & COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK CHICAGO ST. LOUIS KANSAS CITY NEW ORLEANS 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



36 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




Insist on getting the Can with the Chelco Seal 



LIQUID PRODUCTS in 

"AMERICAN" CANS 



with the Chelco Nozzle and Seal 

SELL MORE READIL Y 

than in any other Package 

THE ONLY SEAL 

that is neat and attractive in appearance, that can 
be opened and closed with the fingers, and that is 

ALWAYS TIGHT 

Seal is always on the Can. 

Never becomes lost or mislaid, 

No leakage. No evaporation. 
No cork to crumble and get into the Varnish or 

other contents. 
Clean, effective and durable. 

AMERICAN CAN COMPANY 

SOLE SELLING AGENTS 

New York Chicago San Francisco 

Offices in all Principal Cities. 



THE HANDSOMEST PACKAGES OF 



Talcum Powder 



VIOLET No. 17 



ROSE No. 20 



10, 15 and 25c Seller*. 
2% oz. round, 4 oz. oval, 8 oz. dome top, 1 lb. canisters. 
Soft, white, velvety powder nicely perfumed. 
Your name on label advertising yourself. 
Prices to make you 100% profit. 
Send for sample. 



HENRY K. WAMPOLE & COMPANY, Inc. 

Manufacturing Pharmacists Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when zvriting to Advertise -<t. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



37 



Alphabetical Index to Advertisers 



'here numbers are omitted, the advertisement appears in alternate issues 
For Classified Index and Buyers' Guide See Pages 10 and 11. 



Page. 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co — 

Albany Chemical Co — 

Albany College of Pharmacy 15 

Albertype Co 66 

Allaire, Woodward & Co 2 

Allegretti Chocolate Cream Co... — 

Allen Stafford & Sons, Ltd 15 

American Can Co 36 

American Druggists Fire Ins. Co. — 

American Bank Note Co — 

American News Co — 

American Stopper Co — 

Ammonol Chemical Co — 

Anglo-American Drug Co — 

Antikarnnia Chemical Co — 

Antiphlogistine 17 

Arai & Briesen 1 

Armstrong Cork Co — 

Athanassiade's Sons, J. E 64 

Bauer Chemical Co — 

Bauer, Justus, & Sou 66 

Becker Co., L. A — 

Becton, Dickinson & Co 59 

Borden's Condensed Milk Co — 

Bouton Co., Inc., J 10 

Breitenbach, M. J., Co 12 

Bristol-Myers Co 13-65 

Brooklyn College of Pharmacy... — 

Buffalo College of Pharmacy — 

Burnham, E 17 

Burnham, Rogal E 66 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co — 

California Fig Syrup Co — 

Carpenter Chem. Co 10 

Centaur Co — 

Chattanooga Medicine Co 2 

Colton Co., Arthur — 

Common Sense Mfg. Co 65 

Crittenton. Chas., •& Co 69 

Cudahy Packing Co. 1 



Pago. 

Davids Co., Thaddeus 4 

Denver Chemical Co IT 

Detroit Show Case Co — 

Detroit & Cleveland Nav. Co. ... — 

Ditntan, A. J 61 

Dougherty, A 10 

Doering & Son, C, Chicago, ill. 10 

Drevet Mfg. Co — 

Druggists Indemnity Exchange... 37 

Eclipse Toothache Gum Co 70 

Eimer & Amend — 

Etna Chemical Co ■ — 

Evans Chemical Co — 

Fairehild Bros. & Foster — 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.. 71 

Fellows Medical Mfg. Co 0.1 

Fries Bros 64 

Fritsche Bros 61 

Gedney, J. W — 

General Drug Co — 

Grand Rapids Show Case Co — 

Graham, Gervaise 1 

Green & Sons, Robert M — 

Hall & Ruckel — 

Hansen's, Chr 70 

Hawaiian Pineapple Products Co., 

Ltd 15 

Hearn, Jas. A 59 

Hinton Chem. Co 70 

Hoffman, Geo. W. 70 

Hoffman-LaRoche — 

Hohner, M — 

Horlick's Malted Milk Co — 

Hudson & Co 11 

Hughes, Henry L 71 

Huyler's Chocolate — 

Hydros Chemical Co — 

Hygeia Nursing Bottle Co — 



Page. 



Ingraham Co., F. F 

International Vending Co. 



70 



Kossling, E 

Kneist, F. V 

Kress & Owens — 

Kropp, E. C, & Co — 

Laboratories of Applied Physi- 
ology of France 1 

Lambert Pharmacal Co — 

Lehn & Fink 72 

Lenox Hotel 16 

Leonard, Theo. , — 

Lilly. Eli & Co 35 

Liebig'8 Extract of Meat Co., Ltd. — 

Liquid Carbonic Co — 

Loeber & Co., H. G 70 

Loreley Duplex Mfg. Co — 



Major Mfg. Co 13 

Mallinckrodt Chem. Works — 

Marvel Co 63 

Mass. College of Pharmacy — 

McAvoy Brewing Co — 

McVey, J. J. 13 

Melliti's Food Co 67 

Merck & Co — 

Merz Capsule Co 2 

Miles Medical Co 15 

Mosteller Mfg. Co — 

Mott Label Co.. W. A 6 

Mt. Washington Box. Co 69 

Mulford, H. K., Co IS 

Nathan Novelty Co — 

Natl. Cash Register Co 7 

Natl. Color Type 

Natl. Licorice Co — 

New England Collapsible Tube Co. 64 
New England Confectionery Co... 72 

New Skin Co 61 

N. Y. Quinine & Chemical W'ks, 
Ltd — 

Pabst Brewing Co — 

I'ape, Thompson & Pape Co — 

Parke, Davis & Co 55 

Pasteur Vaccine Co — 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 69 

Pinex Co 12 

Planten. H., Son 13 

Powers - Weightman - Rosengarten 

Co — 

Prentiss Clock Improvement Co.. — 



Page. 

Ray Mfg. Co., S. E — 

Head, E. B.. & Son Co 66 

Iteducine Co — 

Kesinol Chemical Co — 

Revell. A. H., & Co 17 

Rochester Show Case Works . . . . — 

Rotary Sign Co — 

Royal Specialty Co 6S 

Russia Cement Co — 

Schering & Glatz — 

Schieffelin & Co 3 

.Scott & Bowne 59 

Seger & Gross Co 9 

Sen-Sen Chiclet Co — 

Sharp & Dohme 2 

Sheffield Dentriflce Co 66 

Sheffield File Co 3S 

Shelp, Henry H., £ Co — 

Shinn & Kirk — 

Simmons Hardware Co 6 

Smith Co., J. Hungerford 5 

Smith, F. A 12 

Smith. Kline & French 72 

Smith, Martin H.. Co 71 

Stafford Miller Co 1 

.Stearns, Fred'k — 

Strong, F. H., Co — 

Swanson Rheumatic Cure Co. ... — 

Sylvester's Haarlem Oil 16 

Thermoton Co., The 65 

Torsion Balance Co 72 

1'nited Medical Co. 12 

University of Illinois — 

University of New Jersey 1 

Ungerer & Co — 

Upjohn Co — 

Wampole & Co., Henry K 36 

Waterman Pen Co — 

WANTS 70 

Webb & Sons. Jas 1 

Weissfeld Brothers 12 

Wells & Richardson Co 57 

Whitall Tatum Co 14 

Wirz, A. H 17 

W'olmark Chemical Co 12 

Wood Waste Distilleries Co — 

Wyetb, Jno.. & Bro — 



Voting, W. F. 



12 



DRUGGISTS FIRE INSURANCE 

NAPOLEON SAID "Get your principles right, then 'tis a mere matter of detail." 

YOU CAN ADOPT the right system of fire insurance and the results will surely please you. 

THE RIGHT PLAN is always in harmony with your interests and never conflicts on vital points, 
such as rates and adjustment of losses. 

THE RATES are just to you, not higher to make up losses on poor risks. 

THE ADJUSTMENTS of losses are fairly made. In case of difference of opinion, before 
going to the courts, you have the right of appeal to other practical druggists, who will protect 
you as they expect you to protect them, should they have a fire. 

PUT AN END to unfair rates and danger of lawsuits over adjustments. The leading business 
houses have done it by adopting the inter-insurance plan. It is proved the right principle. 

IN THIRTY YEARS experience the most successful merchants and manufacturers in America 
have found it the safest, lowest cost and most satisfactory plan of insurance; so have some 
thousands of the leading druggists who are subscribers at 

DRUGGISTS INDEMNITY EXCHANGE 

YOU CAN'T AFFORD to lose time in adopting a plan that is now a national success. It saves 
half the usual cost. 

To learn how to get these benefits with your insurance write to 

JOHN W. DAUGHERTY, Attorney and Manager 
506 OLIVE STREET : : : : : SAINT LOUIS, MO. 



I 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST xvhen zvriting to Aivertit'.rs. 



33 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



ARCO 

CONCAVE NAIL FILE 

THE LIGHTNING SELLER A 

€J THE ARCO CONCAVE NAIL FILE has made an instantaneous 

hit, and sells at sight, 
(j This invention is fully protected by letters patent. 
^ The ARCO FILE, with its new concave filing surface, is bound 

to supersede the flexible file just as the latter has displaced 

the rigid flat file, 
q As a toilet requisite it is perfect in appearance and design. 

Material, workmanship and finish are of the highest grade. 
C[ The ARCO CONCAVE NAIL FILE has all the good qualities 

of the best flat files and in addition the concave filing sur= 

face which conforms in shape to the nail, giving that uni= 

form tapering curve which is the pride of every person of 

good taste. 

^ The ARCO FILE removes all irregularities — because the nail 
is curved and the ARCO files a curve and not a straight line. 

AS A DEALERS' PROPOSITION 
No simple invention of recent years has been such a quick 
seller. 

TO DISPLAY IT IS TO SELL IT 

Dealers handling these files report extraor= ^ 
dinary sales, and have re=ordered in larger quantities. 

THE ARCO NAIL FILE RETAILS FOR 25c. 

Remit us today $2 for trial dozen, mounted on 
attractive display cards, and shipped you charges 
prepaid. 

WE ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEE 
THEIR SALE IF DISPLAYED 

A sample file will be mailed to any 
address prepaid for 25c. 

\ Be the first dealer to introduce 
these files in your territory. 

Quantity Price List on request 
Write us today 

SHEFFIELD FILE CO. 



1777 Broadway, 



New York, N.Y. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



4i 



COURT TEST OF PENNSYLVANIA REGULATIONS. 



Friendly Suit to Tert Legality of Regulations by Pennsylvania 
Board for Execution ol Food and Drugs Act— Board Requires 
Specific Disclaimer of Conformity with U. S. P. and N. F. 
—Court Test Arranged For— Statements from Manufacturers. 

(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Philadelphia, January 4— Legal proceedings against the local 
representatives of Sharp & Dohme and Parke, Davis & Co., 
brought by the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Examining Board, 
on the charge of failing to comply with the provisions of the 
Pennsylvania drug law which bave to do with labeling, have 
created a sensation here in every branch of the trade. These 
are the first prosecutions which have been brought for violation 
of this law, and a nice point is involved. The representatives 
of the pharmaceutical houses insist that their products are la- 
beled in conformity with the federal law and that it is unfair 
and impractical for them to otherwise change their labels to 
conform to the provisions of the various state laws. But Chris- 
topher Koch, vice-president of the board, who has charge of 
these prosecutions, holds that the labels in question do not com- 
ply with the board's interpretation of the Pennsylvania statute 
and hence the prosecution. 

The regulation on this point, adopted by the board as its in- 
terpretation of the act, is that when an official drug, different in 
strength, purity or quality from the standards of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary or American Homce- 
pathic Pharmacopoeia, the words "Not of official strength of 
United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary or Ameri- 
can Homcepatbic Pharmacopoeia" must appear on the label. The 
present prosecutions are based on the labeling of essence of 
pepsin. One label contained the statement "Special, 1 to 1,000," 
which the board holds does not comply with its regulations on 
this point. The representatives of the houses in question en- 
tered $500 bail before a magistrate for their appearance in court. 
It is understood that the regulation, not the act itself, is the real 
point on which the pharmaceutical manufacturers take issue, 
and that they will strenuously contest the board's position. 

Parke, Davis & Co.'s Statement. 

Parke, Davis & Co. when asked for a statement for publication 
in the American Druggist furnished the following explanation 
■of the suit : 

A difference of opinion exists between the manufacturing 
pharmacists znd the wholesale drug trade on the one hand and 
the Pennsylvania State Pharmaceutical Examining Board on the 
other as to whether certain rules and regulations of the board 
•do not amount to legislation and are therefore without the pow- 
ers of an executive board. In order to test this question, on 
behalf of the manufacturers generally, we have arranged with 
Christopher Koch, vice-president of the board, for a friendly 
suit. In pursuance of this arrangement, we authorized George 
E. Reed to sell to Mr. Koch a drug package which conforms to 
the Pennsylvania state law, but does not conform to the regula- 
tions, asserted to be an unlawful exercise of legislative power, 
this arrangement being deemed necessary by the attorney of 
the state pharmaceutical examining board to give the court juris- 
diction. The suit is a friendly one instituted by prearrangement 
for the purpose of testing the issues stated. 

Sharp & Dohme Make a Statement. 

Baltimore. January 5.— Dr. A. R. L. Dohme, of Sharp & 
Dohme. when seen about the suit of Parke, Davis & Co., and 

' Sharp & Dohme, brought against the Pennsylvania State Board 
of Pharmacy, said that joint action had been decided upon in 
order to test the pure food and drug law and have determined 
exactly where they stood with reference to the matter in dis- 
pute. The Pennsylvania State Board, he said, went on the sup- 
position that all preparations must conform in strength to the 

I United States Pharmacopoeia, while the complaining firms main- 
tain that they have the right to make compounds of any strength 
they please, provided the fact is clearly set forth on the label. 
In the suit under consideration, the state board had undertaken 



to keep out of Pennsylvania essence of pepsin, made in the 
strength of 1 to 2,000, while the U. S. P. specifies 1 to 3,000 as 
the standard strength. The state board consequently maintained 
that the essence of pepsin distributed by the petitioning manufac- 
turers was an adulteration under the law. 

"A similar attempt was made in Washington," said Dr. 
Dohme, "and there the courts decided that we had the right to 
put out preparations of a lower strength, the court holding that 
there could be no misbranding or adulteration when the strength 
was clearly .stated on the label. The court sustained our posi- 
tion in every particular. We have been subjected to great an- 
noyance and petty persecution through attempts of state boards 
to read into the drug law interpretations which Congress did 
not put into them and did not intend, and after a conference 
with Parke, Davis & Co. we decided to appeal to the courts and 
have all doubts on the subject disposed of. It is a friendly pro- 
ceeding, intended to determine whether our construction of the 
statute is right or wrong, and we confidently expect that we will 
be fully sustained, and that it will be decided that our goods 
cannot be kept out of Pennsylvania by any arbitrary ruling of 
the Board of Pharmacy there. We want to stop boards making 
all sorts of vexatious regulations and putting the manufacturers 
to no end of trouble. If the contention of the board were right, 
many hundreds and even thousands of preparations would be 
affected. We are making our essence of pepsin as we have 
made it for many years, and believe confidently that we are 
complying in all respects with the requirements of the law." 



The German Pharmaceutical Society's Twentieth 
Birthday. 

The twentieth anniversary of the foundation of the Deutsche 
Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft was celebrated on December II 
by a festive meeting followed by a banquet in the new building 
of the German Apotheker Verein, in Berlin. After a speech 
by Professor Thorns, to whom the society largely owes its 
present honored position, and in which he traced its progress, 
an interesting paper was read by Privat Docent, Dr. Anselmino, 
on the new German Pharmacopoeia, an editorial account of 
which is given in this issue. 

The banquet was a higbly successful function, which kept 
the guests together until a late hour, and was enlivened by well 
turned speeches by Professor Thorns, Geh. Reg. Rat Dr. Duis- 
berg, Dr. Salzmann, Professor Kobert and others. The society 
now numbers over eight hundred members. 



The National Association of Pharmacologists. 

At the monthly meeting of the National Association of Phar- 
macologists held in Columbus, Ohio, on December 27, it was 
agreed that the place and time for holding the annual meeting 
shall be determined at the regular meeting to be held on January 
31. The annual dues were increased to $3. In tbe contest for 
obtaining the largest number of members honorable mention was 
made of B. E. Hazard, of St. Joseph, Mo., chairman of the 
Buchanan county committee, for having sent in twenty-five ap- 
plications for membership in one week; and to Gage Y. Kelley, 
of Bluefield, W. Va., who sent in the applications of every clerk 
in his home town. The following members were named as 
members of the county committees on membership : 

W. Earle Lawrence, Hudson Falls, Washington County, N. Y. ; 
A. A. Battista, Tenine, Thurston County, Wash. ; Jacob Segura, 
New Iberia, Iberia Parish, La.; Howard McLese, L. A. Bailey, 
and Ralph Christman, Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio; 
William Heffner and Forrest Walters, Columbus, Franklin 
County, Ohio; T. Vickers and A. Sponenburgh, Joplin, Jasper 
County, Mo., and A. M. Bessette, New Bedford, Bristol County, 
Mass. 



19 



42 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



HEARING ON FOSTER BILL. 



N. A R. D. Favors Measure — N. W. D. A. Proposes Modifica- 
tions—Pennsylvania Board Approves Farther Hearing on 
January 11 — No Action Probable Now. 

{From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Washington, January 5.— Official reports of the recent hear- 
ing before the House Ways and Means Committee relative to 
the Foster bills regarding the regulation of the sale of habit 
forming drugs have just become available. The hearing re- 
ferred to was merely preliminary and will be continued after 
the holidays, probably on the nth of January, but the testimony 
taken at the first meeting serves to show clearly the general 
attitude of those who are interested in the legislation. The 
chief speakers on the bill were Hamilton Wright, the United 
States Opium Commissioner; Christopher Koch, vice-president 
of the State Pharmaceutical Board of Pennsylvania; Dr. Wil- 
liam Jay Schieffelin, and some others. 

Mr. Wright, who had already had a hearing before the com- 
mittee on this subject last spring, covered much of the same 
ground as on the former occasion, though he added some few 
additional points. 

Dr. Schieffelin, in discussing trie Foster antinarcotic bills, 
spoke in favor of the principle of the legislation, and said that 
the National Wholesale Druggists' Association, of which he is 
president, favors the general idea of the measures. The asso- 
ciation desires that morphine and cocaine shall be used legiti- 
mately only. "But," said Mr. Schieffelin. "we are very much 
concerned as to the working of it. My own house has nearly 
10,000 book accounts, and if, through an error of a clerk or 
through the lapse of a license of one of our customers, we sell 
to a man whose license has expired, we become, according to 
this, liable to the minimum penalty of $500 or one year's impris- 
onment, and as I am the president of the company I would 
probably have to serve the term. We respectfully urge that 
section 4 be amended to provide that any written order for any 
of these articles, any of these preparations which bears the 
stamp or imprint, having the license number of the customer on 
it, shall be evidence that the dealer has sold to a licensed cus- 
tomer. I am not urging that those words be inserted, but that 
some such device be provided in order to protect us from this 
serious penalty. We feel that, if possible, where the maximum 
penalty might be prescribed the infliction of the penalty might 
be left to the judge." 

Later on, Dr. Schieffelin said : "Our members are hoping 
that this would be applied to cocaine at first only and later to 
morphine, for the simple reason that there is probably more 
than one hundred times as much morphine sold as cocaine, and 
the experiment could be tried as to whether this method of trac- 
ing the sales would be effective on the cocaine." 

As to the amount of morphine and cocaine sold within re- 
cent years, Dr. Schieffelin said : "The amount of morphine has 
increased. The amount of cocaine has somewhat decreased. 1 
think that is due to the legislation in a number of states against 
cocaine, and also to the awakened conscience in the drug trade, 
which refuses to supply the victim of the cocaine habit, but the 
morphine has materially increased, especially in the form of 
small tablets. All the tablet makers that I have spoken with 
have told me that the demand for small hypodermic tablets has 
steadily increased." 

In suggesting the lines along which modifications should be 
made, Mr. Schieffelin said that he would advise the insertion 
of- the word "knowingly" in the act so as to make it read "who 
knowingly sells, transfers, etc." 

Excessive Consumption of Opium. 

Mr. Koch described the efforts of the state authorities of 
Pennsylvania to restrain the sale of the drugs in question, and 
maintained that in the United States there is an opium con- 
sumption about thirteen times as great as in the combined pop- 



ulations of Holland, Italy, Austria and Germany, with a total 
population of 145,000,000 in all. Dr. Koch favored the Foster 
bill, and said that the insertion of the word "knowingly," as 
favored by Dr. Schieffelin, "would be a mistake," because the 
jury always gives the defendant the benefit of the doubt. 

The Definition of the Terms Salts, Preparations and Derivations. 

Mr. Wright, after presenting the arguments already cov- 
ered in his earlier hearing as to the desirability of the Foster 
bill last spring, also said that the bill was intended to be broad 
enough in its language to include compounds and preparations 
which were made from the habit forming drugs, so as to give 
the legislation an exceedingly wide scope. "The Secretary of 
the Treasury," said Mr. Wright, "has power to define what are 
preparations and salts and derivatives of these drugs. Under 
the opium act he defined what was a combination and what was 
a derivative of opium. These are nearly all synthetical com- 
pounds and they change. The ingenuity of the chemist can 
change them from one thing to another. As this bill stands 
now, I think the secretary feels he has power there to define 
from time to time what these salts, derivatives and preparation* 
are. Practically the same language is used in the Philippine 
legislation, and under that the Commissioner of Internal Rev- 
enue in the Philippines has defined what cocaine is and what the 
various forms of cocaine are." 

N. A. R. D. Favors Foster Bill. 

Willard S. Richardson, of Washington, D. C, representing 
the National Association of Retail Druggists, said: "We are in 
favor of this bill. We have realized for some time that there 
was need of this kind of a law of our own, and have once or 
twice drawn up a bill to cover the ground. We have never 
had one but that had some fault in it. This bill, I think, meets 
the situation the best of any that I have seen, and I cannot see 
any objection to it. I think it would be well if we had some 
regulation by which the Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
could furnish us with a list of those who register." Mr. Rich- 
ardson also filed with the committee resolutions bearing on 
the question of the dispensing of habit forming drugs, passed 
by the National Association of Retail Druggists. 

After random discussion of the best means of enforcing the 
proposed legislation without undue hardship the committee ad- 
journed, without action. It is questionable whether anything 
can be done at the current session of Congress. 



N. W. D. A. Conference on Foster Bill at Dr. 
Schieffelin's Home. 

For the purpose of discussing the objectionable features of 
the Foster bill, H. R. 25,241, with an authority on the use of 
habit forming drugs and of declaring themselves in favor of the 
enactment of a more suitable law for the governmental super- 
vision, regulation and taxation of the sale of such drugs. Dr. 
William Jay Schieffelin, president of the National Wholesale 
Druggists' Association, and several other prominent members 
of this organization, held a conference with Dr. Hamilton 
Wright, United States commissioner at the world's opium con- 
ference, in Dr. Schieffelin's home, at No. 5 East Sixty-sixth 
street, last Monday. Charles E. West, of Boston, chairman of the 
National Wholesale Druggists' Association's Committee on 
Legislation ; Albert Plaut, of Lehn & Fink : Dr. George D. 
Rosengarten and Dr. Frederick Rosengarten. of the Powers- 
Weightman-Rosengarten Company ; W. R. Ritchey, chairman of 
the proprietary goods committee of the N. W. D. A. : Dr. Louis 
Schaefer, of the Schaefer Alkaloid Works, of Maywood, N. J.; 
Frank E. Holliday. general representative of the N W. D. A., 
and J. E. Toms, secretary of that organization, were among the 
confrerees. 

At this conference the N. W. D. A. representatives voiced 
their objection to section one of the Foster bill, which includes 
among the habit forming drugs, whose sale it is sought to regu- 
late, coca leaves, chloral and cannabis indica as well as prepara- 



20 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



43 



tions of opium containing small quantities of that drug and 
derivatives. The conferees suggested that a provision should 
be incorporated in this section of the bill exempting preparations 
containing small quantities of these articles along the lines of the 
national model narcotic bill which was incorporated in the pres- 
ent drug law of the District of Columbia and which has been 
entirely satisfactory to all interested. The N. W. D. A. repre- 
sentatives also stated that the retail druggists would be put to a 
great deal of unnecessary inconvenience by observing the pro- 
visions of section three of the Foster bill, which applies to the 
remanufacturing and compounding of all the drugs, salts, deriva- 
tives and preparations of the articles named and requires that re- 
tailers of such preparations shall keep books on them and sub- 
mit and give such bonds as the Commissioner of Internal Rev- 
enue may, from time to time, prescribe. 

The conferees also showed the objectionable feature of sec- 
tion six of the bill, which provides that, after giving such a bond, 
anyone manufacturing, handling or even dispensing these prep- 
arations "who violates or fails to comply with any of the re- 
quirements of this act or any regulation issued thereunder, shall, 
on conviction, be fined not less than $500 nor more than $5,000, 
or be imprisoned not less than one year nor more than five years, 
or both." They pointed out further that any retailer who fails 
to keep a correct record or affix some kind of a stamp, label 
or mark as required by this bill, must be fined not less than 
$500 for such failure even if his offence consists merely of fail- 
ing to place upon an ounce bottle of paregoric the required label 
or mark, and that the judge, before whom he is arraigned, will 
have no option in the matter but must impose this enormous 
fine for a very small offence. 

Although Mr. Wright would not make any promise as to 
what he would do toward influencing the House of - Repre- 
sentatives Committee on Ways and Means, which has the Fos- 
ter bill in charge to modify some of its provisions, it was under- 
stood at the conclusion of the conference in Dr. Schieffelin's 
home that the United States Opium Commission would seek to 
have the amount of the fine for violation of the provisions of 
this bill lowered materially and to have coca leaves, chloral and 
cannabis indica as well as preparations containing small quan- 
tities of opium and its derivatives eliminated from the list of 
habit-forming drugs and preparations which this bill seeks to 
regulate. 



Southern Association of Boards. 

At the semi-annual meeting of the Southern Association of 
Boards of Pharmacy held in Atlanta, Ga., recently, L. C. Lewis, 
of Tuskegee, Ala., was elected secretary to succeed C. D. Jor- 
dan, of Georgia, who resigned. 

In addition to the routine business, consisting of the reading 
of the president's address and the reports of the officers and 
committees, the following subjects were discussed: Board 
Methods of Examination, Interchange of Certificates Between 
States, and Arrangements for an Interchange of Certificates 
with the Interstate Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Although but five states were represented at the meeting, 
the association comprises all the southern states. Its object is 
to bring the members of the boards into closer contact and even- 
tually establish a reciprocal exchange of certificates between all 
the states. This is not possible at present owing to the different 
requirements of the several states. The association hopes to 
bring about a uniformity of laws which will allow of reciprocity 
in all the southern states. 

Among those in attendance were the following: From Geor- 
gia, W. S. Elkin, jr., of Atlanta; C. D. Jordan, of Monticello; 
R. H. Land, of Augusta; S. E. Bayne, of Macon, and J. B. Rau, 
of Macon. From Florida. D. W. Ramsaur, of Palatka, and E. 
Berger, of Tampa, who is president of the association. From 
Alabama, L. C. Lewis, of Tuskegee, and W. E. Bingham, of 
Tuscaloosa. From Tennessee, O. J. Nance, of Jackson; J. D. 



Ballard, of Memphis, and J. B. Sand, of Nashville. From Vir- 
ginia, T. A. Miller, of Richmond. 

PRICE PROTECTIVE PLAN BEFORE SUPREME COURT. 



Briefs Filed by Miles and Clark— Basic Principle at Stake- 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Washington, January 6.— Briefs have been filed and oral 
arguments heard by the supreme court in the case of Dr. Miles 
Medical Company v. John D. Park & Sons Company, which has 
just come before the court since the holiday vacation. The case 
came up in writ of certiorari to the United States Circuit Court 
of Appeals for the sixth circuit. The controlling question is 
whether the owner and sole manufacturer of proprietary medi- 
cines, who had conserved the ingredients, operations and process 
of manufacture as trade secrets, had adopted trade names, trade 
marks and trade packages to distinguish its products in the sale 
and advertised them extensively, could, by reason of the facts 
thus indicated, control the prices of its products and the terms 
and conditions upon which they might be sold in such a manner 
as to effect a complete suppression of competition in such arti- 
cles from the hands of the manufacturer to those of the con- 
sumer. This is practically a question whether the facts are 
sufficient to warrant an exception to the general rule of common 
law and statutory regulations governing restraints against trade. 
Incidentally a question involved is whether the contract between 
the Miles Medical Company and the wholesaler and jobber is 
one of sale or of bailment. The lower court held that the con- 
tract between the company and the wholesale drug dealers or 
jobbers was one of ■ sale, and, further, that the system of re- 
straint attempted violated the common law and statutory inhi- 
bition against restraint of trade. 

Under the contract system of the Miles Medical Company's 
lists of contracting retail dealers are furnished to the wholesale 
dealers, each package has its identifying serial number, each sale 
much be reported by the wholesale dealer semimonthly, or on 
demand, together with the name of the purchaser, and, further, 
it is alleged that this system of wholesale and retail contracts 
has been generally adopted by the trade in drugs throughout the 
United States, and is now in full force and effect. This has been 
done for the purpose of preventing the cutting of prices of pro- 
prietary goods. The Dr. Miles Medical Company asks for an 
injunction against the John D. Park Company restraining the 
latter from dealing at all in the products of the medical com- 
pany, and incidentally requiring that the Park people be re- 
strained from mutilating the labels on the packages of the 
goods. 

In the arguments now presented to the court it is admitted 
that the Miles Company expressly disclaims any right under 
the patent or copyright laws of the United States, that the 
products are being sold regularly to the general public and that 
the system of selling followed is intended simply to maintain 
prices and prevent a system of subsales at competitive rates, it 
being granted that under the prevailing system of selling it has 
been possible to build up what amounts to a monopoly. In re- 
ply to the contention of the medical company that it had a right 
to establish the system which has been built up, it is urged 
that the system established is, in fact, a monopoly, and as such 
is violative of the anti-trust laws, there being no ground for 
the making of any exception to the latter, the only damage done 
by the sales of the Park Company being an interference with 
an illegal system of monopolistic control. 



Vermont Board of Pharmacy Appointee. 

Mason G. Beebee, of Burlington, has been appointed a 
member of the Vermont State Board of Pharmacy to succeed 
W. R. Warner, of Vergennes. who was recently appointed to 
the Public Service Commission. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



DRUG TRADE SECTION TO OPPOSE FOSTER BILL 
UNLESS AMENDED. 



Votes to Have Its Legislative Committee Attend Hearing in 
Washington This Wednesday and Advocate Amendment 
Which Will Obviate the Keeping of Records of Preparations 
Containing Small Quantities of Morphine and Other Narcotics 
— Also Elects Officer^ for Ensuing Year. 



Although desirous of placing themselves on record as favoring 
the enactment of some kind of a national law providing for gov- 
ernmental supervision and regulation of the. sale of so called 
"habit-forming" drugs, the members of the Drug Trade Section 
of the New York Board of Trade and Transportation voted at 
their annual meeting, held in the rooms of the Drug and Chem- 
ical Club of New York last Wednesday afternoon, to oppose the 
passage in its present form of the Foster bill, H. R. bill 25,241, 
now in the hands of the House of Representatives' Committee on 
Ways and Means, and to advocate at a hearing before this com- 
mittee this Wednesday that the bill be amended considerably 
and especially so as to obviate the keeping of records of prepara- 
tions containing small quantities of morphine and other nar- 
cotics. 

Thomas P. Cook, chairman of the committee on legislation of 
the Drug Trade Section, read the report of that committee at the 
annual meeting, and devoted the greater part of his statements 
on pending legislation to the Foster bill, concluding with the re- 
mark that "this bill also provides for the most detailed and tech- 
nical regulations as to the weights and measures of the drugs 
used. Your committee has earnestly protested against this bill 
before the House of Representatives' Committee on Ways and 
Means, in conjunction with other drug trade organizations, and 
lias expressed the hope that the bill will not pass unless 
amended." 

Mr. Cook further reported that the committee on legislation 
had made application to the chairman of the House of Repre- 
sentatives' Committee on Ways and Means for another hearing 
on the Foster bill, and that Sereno E. Payne, chairman of that 
committee, had named January 11 as the date for such hearing. 

Albert Plant thereupon made a motion that the chairman of 
the committee on legislation be authorized to appoint the present 
members of this committee as members of a special committee 
to represent the drug trade section at this hearing. His motion 
was seconded and carried unanimously. 

- Mr. Cook reported on behalf of the committee on legislation 
that during the legislative session of last year several bills of 
great importance to the drug trade had been looked after by this 
committee. He then outlined the provisions of the city ordi- 
nance making it a felony to sell morphine or preparations con- 
taining morphine, as well as cocaine, except upon a written pre- 
scription, and explained how, after numerous conferences with 
the commissioner of health and other members of the city board 
of health, the committee had succeeded in obtaining a promise 
that this ordinance will be modified and a new and less exact- 
ing ordinance adopted, which will incorporate a prohibition 
against the sale of habit forming drugs and the regulation of 
the sale of articles containing cocaine and morphine. 

The following officers were elected by the Drug Trade Sec- 
tion for the ensuing year: Chairman of the section, Clarence 
G. Stone, of the Lambert Pharmacal Company; vice-chairman, 
James G. Shaw, of Thurston & Braidich ; treasurer, William A. 
Hamann, of the Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Company; sec- 
retary, William F. McConnell. Members of the executive com- 
mittee : C. R. Cosby, of Eli Lilly & Co. ; Charles S. Littell, of 
C. S. Littell & Co.; Dr. H. C. Lovis, president of Seabury & 
Johnson; Fred. E. Watermeyer, of Fritsche Brothers, and Rus- 
sell R. Sloan, of the Dodge & Olcott Company. 

George William Kemp, of Lanman & Kemp, chairman of the 
section until the election of Mr. Stone to that office, presided at 
the annual meeting, which was preceded by a luncheon. 



COMMITTEES OF THE N, A. R. D. 

The following committee appointments have been made by 
President Harry B. Guilford of the National Association of 
Retail Druggists: 

Transportation. 

S. C. Yeomans, chairman, Chicago, 111.; Sol. A. Eckstein, 
Milwaukee, Wis.; W. D. White, Wilkesbarre, Pa.; Dr. J. D. 
Humphrey, Huntsville, Ala.; W. O. Lemasters, Akron, Ohio; 
M. H. Craig, Jacksonville, Fla. ; Edwin M. Allen, Canaan, N. 
H. ; T. H. Brannan, Atlanta, Ga. ; James W. Avis, Harrison- 
burg, Va. ; George W. Boyson, Cedar Rapids, la. ; R. H. Pax- 
ton, Butte, Mont.; John T. Treasure, Salt Lake City, Utah; 
Mathias Noll, Atchison, Kan.; Robert Sellick, Flint, Mich.; 
Samuel C. Davis, Nashville, Tenn. 

Telephone. 

Wilhelm Bodemann, chairman, Chicago, 111.; D. J. Reese, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Charles E. Heimerzheim, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
William S. Elkin, jr., Atlanta, Ga. ; F. H. Carter, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

U. S. P. and N. F. Propaganda. 

John G. Krul, chairman, Louisville, Ky. ; George W. Payne, 
Providence, R. I.; J. Arthur Bean, Boston, Mass.; W. F. Feder- 
mann. Kansas City, Mo. ; J. E. Klenze, Davenport, la. 

Procter Memorial. 

Dr. William Muir, chairman, Brooklyn, N. Y.; B. E. Pritch- 
ard, Pittsburg, Pa. ; William E. Lee, Philadelphia, Pa. ; John W. 
Coleman, Wheeling, W. Va. ; John W. Lowe. Boston, Mass. 

National Legislation. 

W. S. Richardson, chairman, Washington, D. C. ; John C. 
Wallace, New Castle, Pa.; S. H. Winsted, Paducah, Ky.; P. B. 
Moriarity, Worcester, Mass.; Thomas Stoddart, Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Ralph H. Kuss, South Bend, Ind. ; Frank H. Freerichs, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio ; Charles H. Achelpohl, Quincy, 111. ; Theo. F. Hage- 
now, St. Louis, Mo.; Edward Williams, Madison, Wis. 

Pharmacy Laws. 

M. S. Kahn, chairman, Baltimore, Md. ; L. T. Dunning, 
Sioux Falls, S. D.; Charles T. Heller, St. Paul, Minn.; M. M. 
Taylor, Tampa, Fla. ; Frank Schachleiter, Hot Springs, Ark. 

Fraternal Relations. 

William Ruess, chairman, Cleveland, Ohio; Edgar R. Sparks, 
Burlington, N. J. ; Herman Koester, Galveston, Tex. ; J. W. 
Cubbison, Minnewaukan, N. D. ; J. E. Shell, Lenoir, N. C. 

Form of Organization. 

J. T. Roe, chairman, Mobile, Ala. ; Adam Wirth, New Or- 
leans, La. ; Thomas S. Armstrong, Plainfield, N. J. ; Lincoln 
Wilson, Denver, Col.; Henry Raush, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Auditing. 

Otto Groenland, chairman, Cincinnati, Ohio; W. W. Irwin, 
Wheeling, W. Va.; J. H. Schmidt, Omaha, Neb.; Walter H. 
Grant, Wilmington, Del.; W. A. Busch, St. Louis, Mo. 



States with Which Missouri Board Interchanges 
Certificates. 

Missouri is on terms of recognition with the following states, 
since the Missouri Board of Pharmacy has arranged for an in- 
terchange of certificates with the boards of Alabama, Arkansas, 
Arizona, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Ken- 
tucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
New Mexico, Oregon, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, North 
Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Virginia and West Virginia. The re- 
quirements for a certificate are as follows: An average grade of 
75 percent, must be had and not less than 60 percent, in any one 
branch. Applicants must be at least twenty-one years of age 
and have four years' experience under a registered pharmacist. 
—Meyer Brothers' Druggist. 



22 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



45 



Bowling Contest in New York Narrowing Down. 

With the bowling season about half over, the tournament of 
the Wholesale Drug Trade Bowling Association of New York 
appears to have narrowed down to a struggle for the silver 
trophy cup between the teams of the Corn Products Refining 
Company, E. R. Squibb & Sons, and Seabury & Johnson, who 
have won so many more games than the other contesting teams 
as to make it virtually impossible for the latter to obtain anything 
better than fourth place at the close of the contest. The Corn 
Products Refining Company crew now has won 14 games and 
has lost only 1, while the E. R. Squibb & Sons' team has won 
14 games and lost 4, and the Seabury & Johnson bowlers have 
won 13 games and have lost 5. The team standing fourth in 
the list is that of Seabury & Johnson, which has 8 games to its 
credit and 7 to its discredit. 

At the latest set of games, the Corn Products Refining Com- 
pany won all three games with the Dodge & Olcott Company, 
while E. R. Squibb & Sons also won all its three games with 
Eimer & Amend. At the contest held in the Albion alleys just 
prior to this latest set of games, the Seabury & Johnson team 
won two out of its three games with the Eli Lilly & Co. team, 
and the Sharp & Dohme team likewise captured two out of the 
three games which it played with the Roessler & Hasslacher 
Chemical Company team. At a previous set of games the Roess- 
ler & Hasslacher Company won two out of its three games with 
Eimer & Amend, and the Dodge & Olcott Company also was 
victorious in two out of three games with Eli Lilly & Co. 



Long Island Drug Club Has a Smoker. 

The annual meeting and smoker of the Long Island Drug 
Club was held on December 19 in the assembly hall of the Kings 
County Democratic Club at 120 Schermerhorn street. The fol- 
lowing officers were re-elected: A. W. Gardner, president; John 
Rippinger, first vice-president; C. Barber, second vice-president; 
Edward Schott, third vice-president ; Thomas Lamb, correspond- 
ing secretary ; John Lilienthal, financial secretary, and A. H. 
Higbie, treasurer. The board of directors, with the above of- 
ficers, will be made up as follows : Dr. George C. Diekman, Otto 
Raubenheimer, H. C. Maigs and W. T. Creagan. 



DIED. 

Ball. — In Holyoke, Mass., on Monday, January 2, Charles E. 
Ball. 

Barry. — In Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, December 24, 
Frank A. Barry, aged twenty-nine years. 

Brice. — In Wheeling, W. Va., on Monday, December 26, 
Captain Sylvester L. Brice, aged seventy years. 

Craig. — In Bristol, Va., on Tuesday, December 27, W. H. 
Craig, aged sixty years. 

Farnum. — In Woonsocket, R. I., on Tuesday, December 20, 
Jonathan Backus Farnum, aged seventy-seven years. 

Healy. — In Washington, D. C, on Sunday, December 25, 
James A. Healy, aged sixty-eight years. 

Henry. — In Dallas, Tex., on Saturday, Decembei 17, J. Will 
Henry, aged thirty-eight years. 

Lytle. — In Dayton, Ohio, on Monday, December 26, Thomas 
M. Lytle, aged seventy-four years. 

Pease.— In North Bloomfield, Conn., on Tuesday, December 
13, Edward T. Pease, aged fifty-five years. 

Sulliivan. — In Nashville, Tenn., on Monday, December 12, 
Harry Ingalls Sullivan, aged forty-one years. 

Thomas. — In Dodson, la., on Tuesday, December 20, H. C. 
Thomas. 

White.— In Brooklyn, N. Y., on Sunday, January i, W. Wal- 
lace White. 

Wight.— In Kansas City, Mo., on Wednesday, December 21, 
O. M. Wight. 

Wortmann— In New York, on Thursday, December 29, 
Albrecht Wortmann, aged fifty-nine years. 



Greater New York. 

Louis Tarasch has opened a new store at Lexington avenue 
and Eighty-first street. 

Karl H. Jurgensen has opened a new store at 4820 New 
Utrecht avenue, Brooklyn. 

Glenn Dunbar, connected with the New York office of Eli 
Lilly & Co., spent the Christmas holidays in Chicago. 

A. M. Hopper, local salesman for Eli Lilly & Co., spent the 
Christmas and New Year holidays with Mrs. Hopper in Day- 
tona and Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Philip P. Levy, associated with C. H. Talcott & Co., whole- 
sale druggists, of Hartford, Conn., spent the holidays at the close 
of last year with friends in New York City. 

Stark & Sterrit, or 1222 Bedford avenue, Brooklyn, have sold 
out the pharmacy they recently purchased from Edward T. 
Thurston to F. H. Boyd, formerly of Manhattan. 

W. L. MacFadden, of Wilmington, Del., representing Eli Lilly 
& Co. in the Wilmington territory, spent the Christmas holidays 
with Mrs. MacFadden visiting friends in New York City. 

The quarterly meeting of the New York College of Phar- 
macy, Columbia University, will be held on Tuesday evening, 
January 17. Several amendments to the by-laws will be pre- 
sented for action. 

F. R. Jones has become connected with the traveling staff of 
Lehn & Fink as a sundry salesman and will cover for that house 
the eastern section of New York State and the western portion 
of the New England states. 

Dr. W. C. Bachmann, of the University of Minnesota, made a 
trip to New York City recently for the purpose of studying the 
products offered by the local manufacturing and wholesale drug 
and chemical trade in the interests of his university. 

The Import Drug Company, Finkelstein & Londoner, pro- 
prietors, ask us to state that they have opened a wholesale drug 
warehouse for the sale of drugs, chemicals and patent medi- 
cines at 200 Powell street, Brooklyn. Their office at 33 Liberty 
street, New York, will be continued as a purchasing point. 

Harry C. Yager,who enjoys the acquaintance and friendship 
of a large number of New York druggists through his former 
connection with the firm of Schieffelin & Co., has recently ac- 
cepted a position with John Wyeth & Brother, of Philadelphia, 
as traveling representative on the upper west side of Manhattan. 

W. H. McCracken, who hitherto has represented Lehn & 
Fink in the western part of New York State, has been taken ill 
while visiting friends in Baltimore. Mr McCracken's friends 
will be pleased to learn, however, that his illness is not serious 
and that he will soon be able to return to his duties in his up- 
state territory. 

A band of young rowdies entered the drug store of Alexan- 
der Lipschitz, at 306 Eldert street, Brooklyn, on New Year's 
day and deliberately smashed bottles of perfumery and show 
cases, besides filling their pockets with the druggist's property. 
When Mr. Lipschitz and his brother tried to interfere they were 
brutally assaulted. 

Big Business Building is the title of a talk on advertising 
which will be given by E. L. King before the next meeting of 
the Kings County Pharmaceutical Society, which takes place at 
the Brooklyn College of Pharmacy on Tuesday afternoon, Jan- 
uary 10. Mr. King is manager of the Riker stores and has had 
unusual opportunities for the study of the subject. 

W. H. Winkelman, representing Lehn & Fink in Virginia, West 
Virginia and Maryland, took advantage of the holiday season 
to visit the home offices of his house. F. X. Cook, representing 
Lehn & Fink in Ohio and western Pennsylvania ; S. V. Cope, 
representing the house in Alabama, Georgia and other sections 
of the South, and C. W. Craibe, representing that house in north- 
ern New England also visited the home offices in William street 
during the last week of December. 

The New York Branch of the American Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation will hold its regular meeting on the evening of Mon- 
day, January 9, at the New York College of Pharmacy Building, 



23 



4 6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



115 West Sixty-eighth street, at 8.30 oclock. The speaker of 
the evening will be Dr. J. J. Walsh, dean of the Department of 
Medicine of Fordham University. Dr. Walsh, whose historical 
researches and writings are well known, will speak on The 
Pharmacist in Ancient and Modern Times. The election of 
officers will follow. 

Robert E. Service, the New York state representative of La- 
zell, Perfumer, returned to New York last week from a stay in 
Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia. While in Washing- 
ton he made a courtesy call on Speaker Cannon, and was dis- 
appointed to find that "Joe" had abandoned the big black cigars 
with which the newspaper paragraphists have so intimately iden- 
tified him and taken up with the plebeian corncob, through his 
association with Champ Clark, whose home is in Missouri, the 
birthplace of that humble pipe. 



Interesting Lecture at the New York College. 

Charles E. Vanderkleed, chief chemist for H. K. Mulford 
Company, Philadelphia, is to lecture before the Alumni Associa- 
tion of the New York College of Pharmacy on Wednesday even- 
ing, January II. The subject of the lecture will be Standardiza- 
tion, Chemical and Physiological. It is expected that a large 
attendance of alumni and members of the college will be present 
to hear this lecture, which is sure to be of exceptional interest 
and value. 

Election at the National Pharmaceutical Society. 

A regular meeting of the National Pharmaceutical Society, 
the registered drug clerks' association of New York, takes piace 
this evening (Monday) at the new club rooms of the society. 
West 125th street, corner Eighth avenue, when officers will be 
elected to serve during the ensuing year. The tentative slate 
agreed upon at a meeting of the board of directors on Decem- 
ber 28 was as follows: President, Warren R. Guest; first vice- 
president, John R. Wall ; second vice-president, Harry H. But- 
ler; third vice-president, H. Patterson; secretary, Edward 1. 
Fendler; treasurer, John G. Ahrens. A new board of directors 
will also be elected at this meeting. 

The Manhattan Family Reunion. 

New Year's was celebrated by the annual reunion and dinner 
of the Manhattan Family, consisting of the sales force of the 
Manhattan Drug Company, who had gathered in New York for 
the annual conference and reunion. Preliminary to the dinner 
the force was photographed, took luncheon at the Astor House, 
and spent the evening at the Hippodrome. From the theatre 
the members adjourned to the Hermitage Hotel, where an 
elaborate dinner awaited their coming. W. H. Peek, the presi- 
dent of the company, received the guests, who saw the old year 
out and the new year in with appropriate ceremonies which in- 
cluded the pouring of libations, and they were not poured on the 
hearth either, as in Greece of old. "Dolf" Stahl, secretary of 
the company, who acted as a committee of one on arrange- 
ments, led the force in the family yell as follows: 

Pocahontas and i'owhattan. 
We're the boys from Manhattan 
Rah— Rah— Rah 
Siss — Boom — Ah. 



The New York Alumni Ball. 

The annual ball of the Alumni Association of the New York 
College of Pharmacy, Columbia University, will be held at the 
Eldorado Hall, Fifty-second street and Seventh avenue, New 
York City, on Wednesday evening, February 1. The hall is one 
of New York's newest and most attractive rooms, where every 
convenience is at band. It is the desire of the committee in 
charge to make this one of the best affairs that the Alumni 
Association has ever had, and the committee cordially invites 
all the members and their friends in both the wholesale and 



retail trade to be present. No effort will be spared by the com- 
mittees to make all possible arrangements for taking good care 
of those who attend. The music feature will be excellent. 
Tickets and full particulars can be had of Roy Duckworth, 
chairman, or George Hohman, secretary of the ball committee, 
115 West Sixty-eighth street, New York. 



State Liquor Law Does Not Apply to Prescriptions. 

An ex-policeman, residing in Brooklyn, who intended to 
open a cafe at the corner of Clarendon road and Nostrand ave- 
nue, but who was prevented by the objections of people in the 
neighborhood, sought to get revenge on Sigmund Fieldstein, the 
manager of the Rappaport Drug Company's store at 3001 Clar- 
endon road, who had taken an active part in the opposition to 
the licensing of the saloon, going so far as to circulate a peti- 
tion against it. The prospective saloonkeeper saw the petition 
and he sent a prescription to Fieldstein which called for a cer- 
tain amount of whiskey, some water and one-tenth of a grain 
of strychnine. The prescription was filled and returned to the 
ex-policeman, who immediately got a summons for the druggist 
for selling whiskey without a license. The case was tried be- 
fore Magistrate Hylan in the Flatbush court, who paroled Mr. 
Fieldstein and took the case under consideration. In a de- 
cision handed down on December 29, the magistrate found the 
defendant not guilty and ordered his discharge, on the ground 
that "the filling of a physician's prescription by a druggist or 
pharmacist, of which there is a part liquor, commonly known 
as whiskey, along with other ingredients, is not a violation of 
the statute." 

In direct opposition to the interpretation of the law cover- 
ing such cases as claimed by Assistant District Attorney Ma- 
honey, who, together with Frederick Matthews, appeared for 
the prosecution, the magistrate further declared in his memo- 
randum : 

"A physician's prescription to a druggist or pharmacist, one 
of the ingredients being whiskey, does not come within the 
definition of subdivision 6; article 1, of section 2 of the liquor 
tax law. This section refers to the prescription or mixture of 
liquors to be sold for purposes otherwise than for medicinal 
purposes. 

"Nor does it come within subdivision 3 of section 8 of the 
liquor tax law, where liquors are allowed to be sold by a drug- 
gist or pharmacist upon the prescription of a physician. This 
subdivision allows a druggist or pharmacist, after securing a 
license, to sell liquor on the prescription of a physician only, 
such prescription from a physician to be filled but once, and 
refers to a prescription for liquor as defined and meant by the 
liquor tax law, and to a prescription for liquor only. 

"Subdivision 3 of section 8 does not prohibit the compound- 
ing of a prescription issued by a physician containing whiskey, 
along with other ingredients to be used for medicinal purposes. 

"The complaint is dismissed and the defendant discharged." 

Lawyer G. Roberts appeared for the defendant and many- 
witnesses testified. Assistant District Attorney Mahoney was 
drawn into the case and he took issue with Roberts, claiming 
no druggist could sell liquor in any form, for medicinal purposes 
or otherwise, whether on doctor's prescription or not. without 
first having obtained a liquor dealer's license. 



Several New Stores in Jersey. 

W. S. Vanderbeck has opened a store in Westwood. N. J. 
Cahoon & Wilson have started a new pharmacy in Midland 

Park, N. J. . 

James C. Nixon has purchased the stock and fixtures of the 
store at 151 Oakland avenue, Jersey City, hitherto conducted by 

G. C. L. Maes. 

Kellogg & Holmes, Rock Springs, Wyo., have a handsome 
new "Tceless" counter service soda fountain made by Robert M 
Green & Sons. 



21 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



47 



Annual Meeting of the German Apothecaries' 
Society. 

The fifty-ninth annual meeting of the New York German 
Apothecaries' Society was held on December I, when officers 
were elected to serve during the ensuing year. The feature of the 
meeting was the address of President George Kleinau, who re- 
viewed the work of the year. He advocated the repeal of the 
"nonsensical cocaine law." He said the scientific committee of 
the society was deserving of praise for the instructive and in- 
teresting lectures which they had arranged for the benefit of the 
members. After mentioning how the society had been hon- 
ored through the appointment of representatives to state and 
national committees, complaint was made regarding the alleged 
shabby treatment meted out to them by the New York State 
Pharmaceutical Association, and he advised the delegates to the 
next convention to act according to the motto, "No representa- 
tion, no donation." The address closed with expressions of 
thanks for the technical and newspaper press which had shown 
interest in the affairs of the society. 

For the nominating committee Felix Hirseman recommended 
the re-election of the present officers, and action was taken ac- 
cordingly. The officers of the society are : 

President, George Kleinau ; honorary president, Gustave 
Ramsperger; vice-presidents, Dr. C. F. Klippert, Paul F. Ge- 
bicke; recording secretary, O. P. Gilbert; corresponding secre- 
tary, E. A. Boettzel; treasurer, Robert S. Lehman; archivist, 
George Leinecker; librarian, George C. P. Stolzenburg; trustees, 
E. C. Goetting, C. F. Schleussner, Felix Hirseman ; chairman of 
the scientific committee, Emil Roller; chairman of the legisla- 
tive and trade committee, S. V. B. Swann ; society chemist, Vir- 
gil Coblentz ; society lawyer, Charles A. Kalish ; messenger, 
Henry A. Bauer. 

The lecturer of the evening was Dr. Curt P. Wimmer, who 
had the Chemistry of the Alkaloids for his subject. 

S. V. B. Swann, chairman of the legislative and trade com- 
mittee, advised the members not to be frightened by the in- 
spectors of the Board of Health in their enforcement of the 
ordinance pertaining to the sale of morphine. He said : "If an 
inspector enters your pharmacy and asks for paregoric or cholera 
mixture and, showing his authority, demand what right you have 
to sell them, point to your diploma on the wall and say that the 
state is you authority. Should, however, he ask another drug- 
gist in the vicinity to sell him some narcotic proprietary he 
should refuse the sale, escort the inspector to the door and re- 
move him with some back pressure." 

A real German baron, Dr. Felix Freiherr von Oefele, was 
the principal speaker of the evening at the regular monthly meet- 
ing of the New York German Apothecaries' Society, his subject 
being the development of the prescription among ancient Egyp- 
tians and Babylonians. His address was illustrated by the ex- 
hibition of prescriptions of Egyptian hieroglyphics and in Baby- 
Ionic cuneiform, and of pharmaceutical implements found in the 
catacombs of Egypt and the ruins of Babylonia. These had been 
loaned by Prof. Max Miller, of Philadelphia. Five delegates to 
the Boston meeting of the American Pharmaceutical Association 
were elected, as follows: W. C. Alpers, Otto Raubenheimer, 
Emil Roller, Hugo Kantrowitz and Louis Berger. Dr. E. C. 
Goetting read a letter which he had addressed to the commis- 
sioner of health regarding the morphine ordinance and the reply 
received, which was to the effect that the matter was still under 
advisement. The death of Albrecht Wortmann, at the age of 
fifty-nine, was announced. In the absence of Paul F. Gebicke, 
his report as custodian of the mortuary fund was read by the 
secretary. On the death of a subscriber his heirs receive within 
twenty-four hours a sum equal to $i from each subscriber. Dur- 
ing the past year $712 had been paid on six deaths. A letter 
from the Manhattan association regarding the $5 license fee re- 
quired of those handling benzin was referred to S. O. B. Swann 
as chairman of the committee on legislation. 



HOLIDAY BUYING LIUHT IN BUFFALO. 



Departments That Do Not Pay— For a Greater University. 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Buffalo, January 6. — The Buffalo retail druggist is not speak- 
ing of his holiday trade in these degenerate times. Mostly he 
did not have any, and if he did he had to sell everything very 
low or see his stock remain on hand. Even the large stores, 
which carry a good many lines of goods, report that the holiday 
trade was very light. People bought holiday goods quite as 
much as usual, but they no longer think of drug stores as places 
where such things are to be found. 

There are a lot of things to think of, even where a drug 
store does not confine itself to a single line of trade, or to even 
a few lines. Competition is so very sharp that in straight drugs 
there is often nothing that pays a good profit outside of prescrip- 
tions. A Buffalo druggist said the other day that in looking 
over his business far the year he found nearly all of his profits 
in two or three departments, doing very well if he came out 
even with the rest. He was inclined to be quite disturbed about 
the discovery, because he no doubt expected a profit from vari- 
ous other things. 

Itemized Accounts by Departments. 

The lesson of this discovery is that it is not safe in these 
days to "lump" everything and merely find out what the show- 
ing is as a whole. If some things are doing well and others 
are not, the sooner the dealer finds it out the better he will be 
equipped for a profitable trade next year. Too often he does 
not find it out at all. He sort of knows that some things pay, 
and he wonders why his profits as a whole are not larger. 

University News. 

The people interested in the University of Buffalo are pre- 
paring for an active campaign in the line of building up that in- 
stitution. Dean Gregory, of the College of Pharmacy, said the 
other day that Chancellor Norton was in good health again, and 
the doctor's permit allowed him to go ahead with the work 
freely. The next step will be to ask the city government to en- 
ter into a contract with the university for turning over some 
of its school funds for that purpose. 

A Cocaine Peddler. 

The cocaine fiends received a blow in the city lately in the 
death of Horace Reed, who was a peculiar sort of vagabond, 
dealing out this drug on the sly to confirmed users, and who 
passed under the title of "Mother Ocean." Reed was only 
thirty-eight years old. He had been arrested on the charge of 
vagrancy, as there was no evidence of the other offense against 
him. He, however, evidently feared such a charge, and com- 
mitted suicide in his cell by taking potassium cyanide. A hypo- 
dermic needle was found in his pocket. 

BUFFALO JOTTINGS. 

It was rather an expensive Christmas that came down upon 
the drug store of Biles Bros., at School street and West avenue, 
which took fire on the night of the 23d, and was damaged to 
the extent of $7,000, the fire coming from another store in the 
same block. 

An effort to educate people in regard to tuberculosis has 
been made by Health Commissioner Fronczak, through the me- 
dium of the picture shows. The managers of these shows have 
mostly signified a willingness to co-operate in the movement, 
though it is not stated just what is to be done. 

The Buffalo bowling season is very active, the druggists get- 
ting their full share of the sport. Ex-President Lockie, of the 
State Pharmaceutical Association, who has been laid up for 
some time on account of an injury, has so far recovered that he 
has gone back to bowling again. 

The dinner lately given to his outside men by Manager 



I 



25 



4 8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Whelan, of the Buffalo office of Parke, Davis & Co., was unique. 
The outside men attached to the office had beaten the manager 
and his inside men in a bowling game, and this is what he 
set up for them by way of menu : First course, one slice Spanish 
onion ; second course, one slice lemon ; third course, one sar- 
dine, one chestnut, one bean ; fourth course, one smoked her- 
ring, garnished with raw corn and raw potatoes; fifth course, 
limburger cheese and crackers, followed by a cake of soap and 
a bowl of water, also cigars of the vintage of 1800, full of worm 
holes. Each course was accompanied by water in exquisite 
wine and champagne glasses. The boys fell on the onion and 
finished that and did some execution on the other "viands," af- 
ter which an excellent dinner of the more ordinary sort was set 
up. The bouquet was of faded roses, and the table was gar- 
nished with roses that had gone out of business. A platoon of 
waiters of the Ellicott Club were in attendance, all of whom 
were very much interested in the proceedings. 

Walter Carlson, lately in the drug business in Jamestown, 
has joined the Parke, Davis force in Buffalo, and is covering a 
portion of Buffalo and vicinity. 

Wellman Bros., druggists of Jamestown, have been making 
large additions to their block, it having been damaged some 
time ago by fire. The new work is not yet quite finished. A 
first class bowling alley will be part of the equipment. 

E. C. Sutton, president of Wheat's Ice Cream Company, who 
was lately elected president of the National Ice Cream Manu- 
facturers, will attend the meeting of that body at Dallas, Tex., 
this year, with the idea of bringing it to Buffalo next year. 



New York State News. 

The village of Granville, Washington County, N. Y., was fire 
swept on Tuesday morning, January 2, and the three drug 
stores there destroyed. 

The Pinacle Pharmacy, on Monroe avenue, Rochester, was 
opened under very favorable auspices on December 15. 

The Ellicott Drug Company, of Buffalo, have issued a very 
neat catalogue for the use of their patrons. 

E. W. Simmons, of Canandaigua, has been confined to his 
home by sickness for some time, but is improving nicely. 

R. W. DePuy, the veteran perfume salesman, has been en- 
gaged by the Theo. Ricksicker Company, of New York, to sell 
their goods to the New York state drug trade. 

Radder & Young, of Buffalo, will open a new drug store 
about January 25. 

The Miller-Strong Drug Company, of Niagara Falls, 
has bought the drug store of Eugene Laurier, of that place, 
and now operate three drug stores at the Falls. 

H. B. Guilford, president of the N. A. R. D., will open his 
new drug store in the Sibley building, Rochester, about Feb- 
ruary 1. 

The Blauw-Barnum Drug Company, wholesale druggists, of 
Rochester, having sold their business to the Gibson Drug Com- 
pany, Mr. Blauw becomes buyer for the last named concern. 

The Weld-Dalton Drug Company, of Syracuse, will open 
their third drug store about February 1 on Salina street. 

Fuller & Wildhack have purchased the old established drug 
store of H. A. Plumb at Utica, and are making several im- 
provements in it. 

H. P. Snow, president of the Commercial Travelers' Aux- 
iliary, has issued a New Year letter to the members of that 
hustling organization asking them to try and make this the ban- 
ner year for new members to the New York State Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

Joseph Litster, the Rochester representative for Parke, Da- 
vis & Co., has taken the management of their Pittsburgh office. 

George S. Hicks, for past nine years detail man for the 
Mul ford Company, of Philadelphia, has taken a similar position 
with Eli Lilly & Co., of Indianapolis. 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD CRITICISES DISPENSING 
PHYSICIANS. 



Law to Regulate Physicians' Dispensing Desired— Board Divided 
as to the Graduation Prerequisite— Changing Conditions. 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Boston, Mass., January 6. — In the twenty-fifth annual re- 
port of the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Pharmacy 
which has just appeared, the board recommends legislation for 
the regulation of dispensing by physicians, placing them on the 
same plane as other citizens who sell these commodities. 

The report says : 

The condition of the drug trade through the state has been 
generally satisfactory. About 27 new stores have been estab- 
lished and 16 discontinued. 

The financial report of the secretary shows that the fees trans- 
mitted to the State Treasurer this year have exceeded all ex- 
penses of the board by $1,583.49. 

The demand for good, competent clerks is constant, and the 
board has examined 495 candidates, granting 11 1 certificates as 
registered pharmacists and 143 as assistant pharmacists. 

A decided change in regard to the treatment of apprentices 
and clerks in drug stores has taken place. The former ideal 
condition, when the proprietor taught his clerks and took a per- 
sonal interest in their progress, is a thing of the past. At pres- 
ent, especially in the larger stores, the clerk is hired to do one 
part of the work, and if he does this well, is apt to keep his 
position and do this only. For instance a drug clerk may work 
on a soda fountain for five years, and not do any thing else in 
the store. This same condition exists in all the states. Such a 
man often expects to obtain a certificate of registration in phar- 
macy, claiming that his long experience in a drug store entitles 
him to a certificate. 

On account of this condition it seems imperative that a sys- 
tematic training in the science and art of pharmacology in some 
school should be required of applicants for state board exam- 
inations. In several states laws have been enacted requiring the 
applicant for registration in pharmacy to have obtained a diploma 
from some school of pharmacy recognized as giving a competent 
and comprehensive course of study satisfactory to the boards 
of education or to the boards of pharmacy of the respective 
states, as a prerequisite for examination. The members of our 
board are divided as to the wisdom of such legislation at the 
present time, but we feel it our duty to present the facts. 

A law was enacted in 1908 permitting the board to grant as- 
sistant certificates for the purpose, as expressed in the 1907 re- 
port of this board, of protecting the public by compelling owners 
of drug stores to have at all times a competent registered person 
in charge of the store. During the two years since the law went 
into effect 361 assistant certificates have been issued. We would 
recommend that a specific law be enacted, compelling the at- 
tendance of a registered or assistant registered pharmacist at all 
times in drug stores open for business, the law to take effect 
January 1, 1912, thus giving the proprietors ample time to com- 
ply with such a provision. 

The physicians of this commonwealth are dispensing pharma- 
ceutical preparations, narcotic tablets and compounds bought from 
manufacturers often without regard to quality; and we believe 
it would be for the best interest to place physicians who dispense 
and sell medicines under such restrictions as will be consistent 
with the laws governing other citizens merchandising in these 
commodities. 

The necrology for the year has been reported by the hoard 
as follows: George Barrett, Peabody; Alfred Bertrand, North 
Brookfield; George P. Brown, Winchester; Josiah Bryant, Ar- 
lington; William H. Butler, Brookline; Karl Castlehun, New- 
buryport; Edward H. Clegg, Gloucester; Joseph W. Colcord, 
Lynn ; Thomas A. Colton, Brockton ; John Considine, New Bed- 
ford; James J. Curran, Holyoke; Frank Emerson, Lawrence; 
Francis P. Fitzgerald, Salem; William Goodwin, Marblehead; 
Rowland K. Gordon, Roxbury: Ezra C. Gove, Cambridge; 
George D. Hayes, Lawrence; William F. Heagey, Salem: Her- 
mann Henritz, Holyoke; Edward T. McGibben, Boston: William 
S. Moody, Dorchester; Ezra E. Rockwood, South Boston; 
George C. Sheppard, Southbridge ; Arthur Tessier, Boston ; Wil- 
liam J. Vizard, East Brookfield. 



26 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



49 



PHILADELPHIA BRANCH DISCUSSES 606. 



Dr. Daland Tells of Work Under Ehrlich— Dr. Turner on the 
New Chemotherapy— The Ethics of the Patent. 

(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Philadelphia, January 4— Many members of the drug trade as 
well as representatives of the medical profession last evening 
attended the monthly meeting of the Philadelphia Branch of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association and listened with rapt at- 
tention to the discussion of Ehrlich's remedy, the much talked of 
"606." The speakers were Dr. Judson Daland, a member of the 
faculty of the Medico-Chirurgical College; Joseph L. Turner, a 
prominent chemist of the city, and Dr. F. E. Stewart, one of the 
best known representatives of chemistry, pharmacy and medicine 
in the ranks of the American Medical Association, the American 
Chemical Society and the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

The results of the use of the remedy that had come under 
Dr. Daland's personal observation during the several months he 
spent in Professor Ehrlich's laboratory, formed perhaps the most 
interesting portion of his discourse. He described its color, dos- 
age, its chemical properties in the form of powder and in solu- 
tion and the success in the various methods by which it had been 
introduced into the body. These methods were the injection sub- 
cutaneously, intramuscularly or by intravenous injection. He 
was inclined to favor the latter method as giving the best dis- 
tribution with less pain. He explained that it was never given 
by the mouth and that when exposed to the air it not only 
changed color but became poisonous. He predicted a reduction 
in dosage, which was now six-tenths of a gram in a man when 
given intramuscularly. 

Dr. Daland described in detail some of the cases that had 
come under his observation, some of the changes that had been 
advocated by eminent German physicians as the result of their 
experiments, and also told of the properties of the other efforts 
made by Ehrlich before he reached his "606th effort." He em- 
phasized the importance of accurately fitting the dose to the 
needs of the patient and he declared "We don't say yet that it 
cures — we want three or four or five years more of study to say 
whether it is a permanent or only a temporary cure." 

In closing Dr. Daland said : "The whole process is in course 
of study. The great question now is how long the beneficial re- 
sults already attained in some cases will continue. Some reports 
show a relapse of from 2 to 25 percent. Of course if the dose is 
insufficient, such relapses are to be expected, but there is a new 
chapter opening and that only can be met with time and study 
and experimental work." 

Mr. Turner's discourse was confined to the new branch of 
science "Chemotherapy," which had been established by Ehrlich 
in discovering this new drug. It was, he showed, an entirely 
new method — one which instead of fitting a known drug to a 
little known disease, studied the disease and then manufactured 
a drug to combat that disease. The various experiments that 
had been tried successively by the German scientist were ex- 
plained in a most interesting manner by Mr. Turner, who pre- 
dicted equally valuable results by the general adoption in scien- 
tific fields of chemotherapy. (See page 23.) 

"Six Hundred and Six. as a Patented Product" was the sub- 
ject of Dr. Stewart's address. He referred to the criticism that 
had been made in some circles because Ehrlich's remedy had 
been patented and was inclined to the position that under the 
German patent laws he was entirely right in protecting the result 
of his long and expensive series of experiments. He showed in 
reply to the report that it would be patented in this country also, 
that under the United States laws the registering of the trade 
mark "Salvarsan" would mean that it would virtually become a 
perpetual patent. Dr. Stewart did not think that the latter course 
was entirely ethical. 

Henry Kraemer made an interesting report on the matter of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association issuing a journal of 
its own. Owing to the death of Dr. C. S. N. Hallberg. who had 
been selected as its editor, and the fact that no one had yet been 



found to take his place, Professor Kraemer's committee recom- 
mended that the publication be delayed until January, 1912, in- 
stead of July, 191 1, as had been decided at the Richmond meeting 
last year of the American Pharmaceutical Association. But J. 
W. England did not agree with him on this suggestion .and he 
amended the original motion to provide for the receipt of the 
report and to refer it to the Committee on the Publication of 
the Journal. 

LOCAL HAPPENINGS IN PHILADELPHIA. 

A special meeting of the Philadelphia Association of Retail 
Druggists will be held at the Drug Club on the evening of 
January 19 for the purpose of discussing and acting upon the 
draft of the codification of the present pharmacy act and the new 
anti-narcotic law which has recently been put in form by Sam- 
uel M. Clement, attorney for the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical 
Examining Board. 

The date of the annual meeting of the Drug Club has been 
changed from January 26 to January 20. 

The date for the banquet which the Legislative Committee 
of the Philadelphia Association of Retail Druggists will tender 
the Philadelphia members of the Pennsylvania Legislature is 
January 27. It will take place at Kugler's and it is expected that 
approximately 350 persons will participate. These will include 
Philadelphia's senators and assemblymen, members of the P. A. 
R. D. in good standing and prominent state and city officials. 

An effort is being made by the physical director of the Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy to get up a class among the retail 
druggists of the city who are graduates of that institution. 

Secretary L. L. Walton of the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical 
Examining Board announces that the next examination will be 
held at Harrisburg on February 18 in the High School building. 

The Scientific Section of the Philadelphia Branch of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association will discuss bacterial vac- 
cines at the monthly meeting, January 22. It will be held in the 
library of the H. K. Mulford Company. Dr. A. Parker Hutchins 
will open the discussion. 

Harry T. Miller, for many years with Shoemaker & Busch, 
has become a member of the sales force of Hance Brothers & 
White. 

G. B. Galton, the local representative for Bauer & Black, fell' 
on the ice and broke his leg. 

About thirty members of the sales force of Shoemaker & 
Busch were the guests of the firm at a dinner at the Drug Club 
on Saturday evening. 



Merck & Co.'s New Quarters. 

Merck & Co. have moved into new quarters at 45 and 47 
Park place, Manhattan, after fourteen years spent in the Merck 
building at University place and Eighth street This move into 
the wholesale business centre of New York, near the Hudson 
Terminal buildings, has been in contemplation ever since the 
Merck works were established in Rahway, N. J. The new, loca- 
tion is within three minutes' walk of the Jersey ferries, so that 
office and factory are brought into close connection. The firm's 
auto truck service several times daily between New York and 
Rahway effects a considerable saving in time by reason of the 
change. 

Besides being in close proximity to the McAdoo tunnels and 
the west side ferries, the new Merck headquarters are onlv a 
half block from the Sixth avenue elevated railroad, and are 
within a few minutes' walk of the subways, the Brooklyn bridge, 
the General Post Office, and are hardly more than a block from 
Broadway. 

Merck & Co. have a tract of 120 acres at Rahway, a consid- 
erable portion of which is already taken up by their extensive 
works, warehouses and the cottages of superintendent and chem- 
ists. Here the shipping facilities are of the best, with a half 
mile of railroad sidings alongside the main tracks of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad. 

The western branch office of Merck & Co. remains at St- 
Louis, Mo. 



27 



5° 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



THE NEW ETHICAL PHARMACY IN BALTIMORE. 



Not Like Other Stores— Novel Features of Hynson, Westcott Es- 
tablishment* 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 
Baltimore, January 6.— One of the most attractive as well 
as unique pharmacies in Baltimore is that of Hynson, Westcott 
& Co., which was opened recently at North and Linden avenues. 
Like the store at Franklin and Charles streets, the new place is 
strictly ethical, only prescriptions being put up and the regular 
sick room and hospital requisites being sold. The fixtures are 
of a unique design, wood being supplanted wherever possible by 
metal, and the general effect is most striking. All the wood is 
of antique oak with shelves of glass. The background of the 
wall cases is of greenish tiles. There are no regular counters, 
floor cases taking their places. The prescriptions are labeled on 
a desk standing in the middle of the floor. Above the open wall 
cases are others closed, the glass being of cathedral style, leaded. 
Instead of the colored bottles in the windows there are ferns 
and a few laboratory appurtenances, such as heat tubes and the 
like. The whole effect is utterly unlike any other pharmacy in 
Baltimore. H. P. Hynson spent much time on working out 
the details and getting ideas in various other cities. Dignity and 
an unmistakable professional aspect are given to the establish- 
ment, which is bound to please the public not less than physi- 
cians. 

Coca Cola Factory Deal Completed. 

The details of the purchase by the Coca Cola Company of 
Atlanta, of the property on the northwest corner of Pratt and 
Concord streets have been closed, Asa G. Candler, president of 
the company; S. C. Dobbs, general sales manager; S. L. Wil- 
lard, eastern manager, and George W. Little, local manager, 
having met in Baltimore for the purpose last month. The area 
acquired is about 20,000 square feet, and ground for the build- 
ing will be broken as soon as possible. The structure to be 
erected is to cost $500,000 and the laboratories to be established 
in this city are to have an ultimate output of goods to the value 
of $5,000,000 a year. The edifice is to be completed and ready 
for occupancy by September 1 of the present year, and Balti- 
more will then be the second largest distributing point for 
Coca Cola in the world. Some forty persons will be employed 
and the weight of the yearly product is estimated at 20,000,000 
pounds. The Coca Cola Company will occupy the basement and 
the other seven floors will be leased for manufacturing pur- 
poses. Mr. Dobbs will visit Baltimore on an average every two 
weeks while the building is in process of construction. 

Gilbert Bros. & Co. Move. 

Gilbert Bros. & Co., wholesale druggists on Howard and 
Grant streets, which location they have occupied for a number 
of years, will take possession shortly of the building heretofore 
tenanted by the Emerson Drug Company, on Lombard street, 
near Eutaw. This is a five-story structure having about fifty 
feet front and running back some 150 feet. Various alterations 
will be made to adapt it to the uses of the new occupants. The 
Emerson Drug Company will move into the Bromo Seltzer 
building on the corner of Eutaw and Lombard streets, which 
is nearing completion and is one of the most striking edifices in 
the city, with its high tower crowned by a gigantic model of a 
bromo seltzer bottle. 

SOUTHERN NEWS NOTES. 

Morris Schimmel has opened a pharmacy at Garrison and 
Highland avenues. 

Joseph W. Moore, a druggist at Eager and Eden streets, 
Baltimore, is ill at the Church Home and Infirmary of typhoid 
fever. 

G. H. Lippe, a clerk for the retail drug firm of Morrison & 
Fifcr, Linden avenue and McMechen street, Baltimore, was 
found dead in bed recently. 



Charles H. Knight has purchased the Piquett Pharmacy at 
Frederick and Garrison avenues, Baltimore. The store will be 
conducted by the firm of Knight & Anderson. 

W. H. Craig, a drug clerk at Bristol, Tenn., was found dead 
in his room on the night of December 27. Heart failure is be- 
lieved to be the cause of his demise. Mr. Craig was a native 
of Maryland and his body was taken to Trappe, on the Eastern 
Shore, for burial. 

Oscar T. Hines, a druggist of Richmond, Va., was charged 
in the police court December 27 with the murder of Charles 
Conway. Conway was ejected from the pharmacy on the Sat- 
urday night before and struck on the head with an iron bar 
used to fasten the door. He died without regaining conscious- 
ness. 



REXALL TRADE MARK ATTACKED. 



Suit Against United Drug Company by Proprietors of " Rex " 
Trade Mark. 



Boston, January 6. — Judge Braley, in the Supreme Ju- 
dicial Court, has filed with the clerk a copy of findings of fact 
with memorandum of decision in the somewhat celebrated case 
of Ellen M. Regis and others, retail druggists of Haverhill, 
Mass., against the United Drug Company, over the use of the 
trade mark "Rexall." The plaintiff's manufacture a dyspepsia 
remedy under the name of "Rex," which is registered both in 
Massachusetts and at Washington. They seek to prevent the 
United Drug Company from infringing upon that trade mark 
by using the name "Rexall," which is also registered as a trade 
mark at Washington. The litigation has been in progress for 
some months. 

By the latest decision the plaintiffs secure a partial victory. 
The court rules that they are entitled to injunctive relief and 
for an accounting, but at the same time the court refused to 
grant an injunction at this time. The case is to go to the full 
bench of the supreme court on questions of law. 

While declining to rule upon eight points requested by the 
defendant, the court announces that all the rights of the de- 
fendant have been saved. The eight points raised by the de- 
fendant cover the questions of the plaintiffs' right to recover 
damages under the pure food laws relating to labelling goods; 
that the name "Rex" cannot be established as a trade mark; 
that, in any event, the name "Rexall" is not so similar to "Rex" 
as to mislead the public; that any relief must be limited to the 
dyspepsia cure and to the state of Massachusetts, and that if any 
reasonable compromise had been offered the plaintiffs cannot 
maintain a suit in a court of equity to recover. 



For a United States Botanical Laboratory in 
Colorado. 

(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Washington, January 6. — Senator Guggenheim, of Colorado, 
has introduced a bill providing for the establishment of a United 
States botanical laboratory at Denver, Col. This laboratory is 
to engage in a study of plant diseases that may exist in the west 
and is to be given an appropriation, under the terms of the bill, 
of $10,000 for the first year of its existence. 



In Memory of Mr. Kline. 

At the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical 
Association, held in Bedford Springs last year, resolutions in 
memory of the late Mahlon X. Kline were adopted, and several 
addresses and eulogies were pronounced. These have been re- 
printed in pamphlet form, together with an excellent photograph 
for distribution among his friends. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS IN CHICAGO AFTER SODA 
SYRUP MAKERS. 



Soda Counter Coffee Under Investigation — To Cut Out Sidewalk 
Soda — A New Sneak Thief Game« 

Chicago, January 6. — Through the quality of cream and coffees 
furnished to the soda dispensers the government inspectors are 
tracing violations of the pure food laws as to such articles, and 
they seem to be making the soda fountains a favored place for 
starting such trails of law violations. Lately several Chicago 
dealers in cream and also coffees have been arrested for furnish- 
ing adulterated goods of that sort to soda dispensaries. 

Dr. Oldberg's Leave Extended. 
When Dr. Oscar Oldberg. dean of the School of Pharmacy 
of Northwestern University, was stricken with a serious illness 

early in the year 
1909, his improve- 
ment was so slow 
that a change of 
climate seemed to be 
advisable. and he 
was given a leave of 
absence and started 
for California, where 
he has since been so- 
journing successively 
at Los Angeles and 
then at La. Jolla and 
San Diego. But as 
the improvement in 
the doctor's general 
health was not found 
sufficient to enable 
him safely to resume 
his duties in the 
school at the end of 
his respite, the trus- 
tees of the university 
PROF. OSCAR OLDBERG. have extended his 

leave of absence for 

a second year, and his friends in the school are hoping to again 
see him in the class rooms at the end of that time in renewed 
health and vigor. Prof. Arthur H. Wilde, secretary of the 
faculty council of Northwestern University, is acting dean of 
the faculty of the School of Pharmacy during the enforced 
absence of Dean Oldl erg. 

A Sneak Thief Operator Under Guise of Repairing Telephones. 

Operating as a telephone repair man a clever sneak thief has 
for some time been working the retail drug stores of Chicago, as 
he did that of Anton Roesch, at 1554 West Twelfth street, a 
short time ago, by entering the telephone booth and laying down 
a leather bag supposed to contain repair tools and then when no 
one was watching he seized a cash box from the prescription 
counter and silently disappeared with $100 in cash that had 
been left there for change. 

His Aesthetic Tastes His Undoing. 

Recently a drug store looter known as Edward L. Walker, a 
negro, was landed in the lockup because of his peculiar habit of 
always taking a liberal sized bottle of the finest perfume in the 
house and then going around redolent of it for a month, which 
made him quite easy to trace, though he didn't seem to realize 
that. 

To Cut Out Sidewalk Soda. 

Forestalling the opening of many more soda fountains in the 
spring by the Greek and Italian fruit vendors, who often face 
them against the sidewalk from an interior of small dimensions 




and very shallow depth, the Chicago Department of Streets has 
sent out over 200 notices to previous owners of sidev/alk canopies 
that no such privileges will be allowed for the coming warm sea- 
son of the current year. 

One Who Ca<ne Back. 

Instead of being lost or done away with a short time ago, as 
some of his friends were inclined to think, Chief Chemist Syd- 
ney H. Smith, of the Siegel-Cooper Store drug department, had 
merely surprised himself and some of his friends by making a 
sudden departure for Europe without announcing his intention to 
do so to his familiars at the Calumet Club, where he has been 
carefully looked over since his return and found none the worse 
for being rocked in the cradle of the deep and eating British beef 
a little while. 

CHICAGO NEWS NOTES. 

Since Pierce Richardson's Ohio drug store was destroyed by 
fire the insurance men at Hilliard have figured out his loss at 
about $1,500. 

Officers of the federal revenue and pure food services in Chi- 
cago have lately been making life unpleasant for the manufac- 
turers of some new proprietaries. 

Under the Illinois corporation laws the Decatur Fountain 
Company has increased its capitalization from $50,000 to $100,000, 
and the Illinois plant of the company at Decatur is to be en- 
larged. 

Lately the Hygenic Ice Company has taken a new departure 
in entering upon the manufacture of carbonated waters for the 
Chicago soda fountain and drug store trade, which they say they 
will go after. 

Recent operations of the federal food and drug law dragnet 
caught the Semrad Chemical Company and the Allen B. Wrisley 
Company with $200 fines for misbranding goods and adulterating 
flavoring extracts. 

Quite a large and ornamental delegation from the Social 
Drug Club was conspicuously in evidence at the annual charity 
ball at the Congress Hotel early in the past week, though not as 
a professional delegation. 

Under the provisions of an Illinois charter authorizing them 
to have $2,500 capital the Messrs. Laurence Zeeman, Samuel J. 
Schaeffer and Morris Kompel have lately organized the Park- 
way Pharmacy and expect to begin business at once in this city. 

Within a short time after buying from Rufus H. Wheeler his 
drug store and soda fountain at 332 East Sixty-first street, John 
Weireter sold the business to Mrs. Christina L. Connolly for 
$3,700. It has a handsome soda equipment, and in the summer 
does a fine trade in carbonated beverages. 

After a brief though eventful career in the hazardous spe- 
cialty of robbing drug stores by the holdup plan, which was in- 
variably topped off by the filching of a box of candy, a young 
man of twenty, named Leigh Rhodus, has just been given a life 
sentence to Joliet prison for killing a spectator who imprudently 
obstructed his departure from the Schrader Washington Park 
Pharmacy with pockets full of cash and caramels. 

Superintendent S. W. Ogden, of the Grasselli Chemical 
Works, and his wife and little three year old son, have all about 
recovered from the recent close call they had from a shocking 
death when a Nickle Plate Railway passenger train smashed 
their automobile and scattered them around pretty generally, 
leaving them thoroughly battered up all except the little fellow, 
who was merely a little scared and seemed to rather enjoy it. 

Principal among the attractions which Edward Von Hermann 
will offer in his new Hotel Sherman drug store will be a hand- 
some soda fountain, which the Illinois Fixture and Ice Machine 
Company is putting in for him, to occupy nearly the whole length 
of the store from the hotel office out. Mr. Von Hermann has a 
handsome drug store on Michigan boulevard and another on 
Thirty-first street as well, and has a ten years' lease of the Hotel 
Sherman store at a rental of $40,000 for the term, though it is 
but a small store. 



29 



5 2 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



THE DRUG AND CHEMICAL MARKET 

Th» prices quoted lrv this report are those current In the wholesale market, and higher prices are paid for 
retail lots. The quality of goods frequently necessitates a. wide range of prices. 



Condition of Trade. 

New York, January 6, 191 1. 

Market conditions during the interval since our last report 
have been marked by an absence of important demand, trade 
being sluggish almost to the point of stagnation in nearly all 
departments. Much of the dulness, of course, must be attri- 
buted to the end of the year inventory work, dealers at this 
season generally restricting their purchases to immediate re- 
quirements only. The tone of the market is steady, however, 
and dealers generally look forward to a satisfactory demand 
during the present month, as it is believed that stock in the 
hands of interior merchants needs considerable replenishing, 
hence the disposition in general to accept the situation with 
good spirit and look forward with confidence to better trade 
results during the present month. The indications are certainly 
favorable for a more extensive trade, as business operations 
have been conducted very cautiously during the year just closed. 
Prices in most instances show increased steadiness, the bulk 
of the fluctuations reported during the interval having been in 
an upward direction. Opium is characterized by continued dul- 
ness, only a limited inquiry being noted, and quinine sells in 
a routine jobbing way only at unchanged quotations. Menthol 
is in better seasonable demand and is held at an advance over 
previous prices. The advancing tendency of ergot has been 
steadily maintained in the face of cables noting higher prices 
at primary resources. Continued firmness is manifested in buchu 
leaves and gum asafcetida, and scarcity of small flake manna 
has influenced holders to quote at an advance. Among the 
seeds, larkspur is still in upward tendency, spot supplies being 
scant and closely concentrated. The chief event of importance 
since our last was a reduction in the price of mercurials, in- 
fluenced by a sharp decline in quicksilver, and manufacturers 
generally announce a decline of 3 cents in hard and 2 cents in 
soft varieties ; the revised quotations are given below in our 
detailed review of the market. Some firmness has developed 
in senna leaves, owing to the receipt of adverse reports regard- 
ing the new crop, but quotations are nominally unchanged. In- 
cident to the higher cost of raw materials Rochelle salts and 
Seidlitz mixture have been advanced; this means an increase in 
the price of tartaric acid reference to which is made below: 
HIGHER. LOWER. 

Tartaric acid, Mercurial preparations, 

Seidlitz mixture, Opium, 

Rochelle salt, Digitalis leaves, 

Oil of bergamot, Glycerin, 

Oil of copaiba, Acetic acid, 

Oil of peppermint. Acetate of lime, 

Wahoo bark of root, Rhubarb root. 

Golden seal root, 

Burdock root. 

Black haw bark of root, 

Bayberry bark, 

Cacao butter, 

Poppy heads. 

Larkspur seed, 

Star anise seed, 

Blue poopy seed, 

Grains of paradise, 

Manna, 

Sugar of milk, 
Menthol. 

Drugs. 

Areca nuts are in advancing tendency abroad, and recent 
cables report a fractional advance, which has led some holders 
in the local market to advance their price to 8c. 

Arnica flowers are held with increased firmness, though quo 
tations do not vary from 10V2 to nc. 



Balsams. — Copaiba, Para, is scarce and wanted and holders 
are firmer in their views at 50 to 52J/2C; South American is held 
and selling at 39 to 40c. Canada fir is easier and we hear of 
sales at $4.40 for barrels, Oregon being available at 90c. Peru 
is dull at the moment and supplies offer freely at $1.60 to $1.80 
for cases, as to holders. Tolu has developed no action of im- 
portance during the interval; a steady, seasonable demand is in. 
progress, which is met at the range of 20 to 21c. 

Barks. — Cotton root is in limited supply, and with little new 
stock coming forward prices are steadily maintained at the range 
of 14 to 18c, as to quality and quantity. Black haw root is 
quiet but steady at 22^ to 23c. Elm, select, in bundles, is firmly 
maintained at the revised range of 15 to 17c. Cascara sagrada is 
quiet, but holders abate none of their firmness, and recent sales 
were at 8y 2 to g z Ac, as to quality. Prickly ash is in better sup- 
ply and offers more freely, though a wide range of values is 
named as to quality and quantity, the limits being 55 to 75c, ac- 
cording to holder. Bayberry continues extremely scarce, and 
the limited available supply is closely concentrated and held at 5 
to 6c. Cramp is inquired for to some extent and values are 
firmly maintained at 7 to 7 l Ac. 

Bay rum continues in good, seasonable demand at steady 
prices, or, say, $1.67^ to $1.70, as to brand. 

Benzoic acid, true, from gum benjamin, is held at an advance 
to 12c in lots of 50 ounces, though down to nH c ' s named for 
1,000 ounce lots. 

Bucbu leaves, short, continue on the upward grade, and lit- 
tle is available at under $1 ; some inquiries for export are re 
ported at this figure. 

Burgundy pitch has developed increased firmness owing to a 
decrease of importations, and 5 to $%c is named for the limited 1 
available supply on spot. 

Cacao butter is fractionally lower, sales of wrapped fingers 
being reported at 39c. 

Cannabis indica continues held and selling firmly at the range 
of $1.20 to $1.30, as to quality and quantity, the outside figure 
being named for true East India. 

Cantharides, Russian, are maintained more firmly, though 
quotations do not vary from the previous range of 70 to 72c 
for whole and 75 to 80c for powdered ; Chinese blistering beetles 
are steady, though in little inquiry, at 30 to 32c. 

Chamomile flowers, Roman, are in moderate demand only ; 
small sales within the range of 20 to 23c, as to quality. 

Cocaine is reported in advancing tendency in foreign mar- 
kets, but quotations on spot do not vary from the previous 
range of $3.35 to $3.55 for the hydrochloride salt. 

Codliver oil. Norwegian, is in good seasonable demand, and* 
quotations appear well sustained at the range of $33 to $35 as 
to brand. 

Colocynth pulp is quoted higher in foreign markets, but vaiues 
on spot are unchanged at 22 to 25c. 

Cubeb berries continue to offer freely, and though the tone of 
the market is easier prices are not quotably higher. XX being 
held at 46 to 48c and natural at 44 to 45c. ; supplies are reported 
slow in coming forward. 

Cuttlefish bone, broken, is held more firmly, and quotation? 
have been generally advanced to the range of 5 to 55^c. 

Damiana leaves are in improved inquiry and quotations are 
maintained steadily at 35 to 37c, with numerous sales reported 
at the inside figure. 

Digitalis leaves are a shade easier and offers more freely at a 
decline to 13 to 14c, there being little inquiry at the amount. 

Ergot is maintained in firm position both here and in primary 
markets, and holders are indifferent sellers at an advance to> 
$1.05. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



53 



Glycerin, refined, has eased off a trifle in the interval and 
quotations are fractionally lower at 25 J4 to 26c in drums, and 
26J4 t0 27c. in cans. 

Grains of paradise are meeting with more attention and prices 
are in upward tendency, with the limited available supply held 
at 25 to 27c. 

Haarlem oil has met with an active inquiry since our last, and 
quotations are steadily maintained at $2.25 jto $2.40, as to qual- 
ity and quantity. 

Kola nuts have been inquired for to some extent during the 
interval, and holders are firmer in their views, with up to 10c 
asked for choice grades. 

Lavender flowers are held with increased firmness owing to 
scarcity, select not offering at under 14 to 16c and ordinary 
at 70c. ( 

Lycopodium is quoted higher, 43 to 45c being now named 
as to brand and holder. The lay down cost is cabled as the 
equivalent of 43H to 45c. 

Manna is scarce and wanted and quotations are firmly main- 
tained at the recent advance to 51 to 55c for small flake, while 
large is unobtainable at under $1, and sorts are selling at 50c. 

Menthol is held at an advance, increased seasonable demands 
influencing holders to name up to $3.55 for jobbing quantities. 

Opium ruled quiet during the interval and values generally 
are fractionally lower, $4.85 to $4.90 being inside quotations on 
cases, and $6.60 to $6.70 asked for powdered and granular. 

Quinine sells in a routine, jobbing way only, and though the 
tone of the market is easier prices are not quotably lower, 14c 
for bulk in 100 ounce tins being required by manufacturers. 

Saffron, Spanish, is firmer and higher, with quotations ad- 
vanced to $10.25 to $10.50, at which range numerous jobbing 
sales are reported. 

Santonin is maintained in steady position at $10.35 to $10.50 
for crystals, and 20c additional for powdered. The rumored 
early advance is not likely to materialize, according to latest 
reports. 

Senna leaves, Alexandria, have continued fairly active and 
values are maintained with some firmness, adverse reports having 
been received on the new crop ; meanwhile sales are making at 
our quotations or. say, 21 to 22c for picked whole, 8 to 9c for 
natural Alexandria, and 7}4 to 8c for sifted. 

Sesame oil is reported in better inquiry and quotations are 
maintained with increased firmness at 75 to 85c for barrels, as to 
quantity and quality. 

Sugar of milk is held with increased firmness, the revised 
quotations being 9^4 to 10c, and forward contracts are reported 
to have been made at the inside figure. 

Tonka beans, Angostura, are firmer to the extent that $4 is 
now generally named for jobbing parcels; the available supply of 
Para is extremely limited, and a recent small shipment of Suri- 
nam is held at $2.75. 

Venice turpentine, artificial, is reported in good demand, 
and quotations are firmly maintained at the range of 9 to 9j4c 

Yerba santa is dull and neglected, but values remain steady at 
15 to 16c. 

Chemicals. 

Acetate of lime, gray, is easier in tone and offers more freely 
at a reduction to $1.75 to $1.80 in carload lots. 

Acetic acid is lower in sympathy with the crude material and 
the revised range for U. S. P., 36 percent., is $4 to $4.90, as to 
quantity and style of package; carboys of 28 percent, are held 
and selling at $1.95 to $2.20. 

Arsenic is in fair consumptive demand, with sales of white 
Teported at 2%c, though 2%c is generally asked. 

Barium chloride has been advanced in the interval and quota- 
tions are maintained firmly at $34.50 to $40. 

Bleaching powder is less freely inquired for, but the market 
is characterized by a firm undertone, and numerous small sales 
are reported at 1.30c. 



Blue vitriol is maintained steadily at 4 to 4}4c, consumers 
supplying their necessities within this range. 

Chlorate of potash is without quotable change, dealers sup- 
plying the wants of the trade at 8J4 to 8^4c for crystals and pow- 
der, respectively. 

Cream of tartar is maintained steadily at 26% to 26J4c for 
crystals and 26 l / 2 to 27c for powdered, but the demand is not of 
a very active character. 

Mercurial preparations are generally lower under the influ- 
ence of the recent decline in the parent metal, and the revised 
schedule of manufacturers is as follows : For 50 pound lots 
(assorted, if desired) calomel is now quoted at 81c, corrosive 
sublimate at 72c, red precipitate at 91c, white precipitate at 96c, 
bisulphate at 55c, ointment, half strength, 44c, one-third strength 
34c, and blue pill 34c; lots of less than 10 pounds are listed 3c 
per pound higher. The new schedule is given in our Original 
Package Prices. 

Oxalic acid is without quotable change and sales are making 
at 7 J Ac- 

Rochelle salt and Seidlitz mixture are higher in consequence 
of the increased cost of crude material, and manufacturers now 
quote 18 to i8^c for the former, and 14H to 15c for the latter, 
the inside quotation being for five barrel lots. 

Tartaric acid was advanced on the 3d instant to the range of 
29J4 to 29>4c for crystals, and 29V2 to 30c for powdered, and 
sales are making to a fair extent at these figures. 

Essential Otis. 

Anise has eased off in the interval, and holders have modified 
recent expressions to the extent that supplies are now available 
at $1.15 to $1.20. 

Bergamot is slow of sale, but the quotations of the market 
are well sustained at the recent advance to $3.90 to $4 in view of 
present scarcity. 

Copaiba is in upward tendency owing to the higher prices 
asked for balsam and quotations are maintained firmly at an ad- 
vance to $1.15 to $1.20. 

Erigeron in a jobbing way meets with comparatively little at- 
tention, but the ma«ket is firm with $1.50 to $1.75 quoted as to 
quantity and holder. 

Orange is held with increased firmness in the face of stronger 
cable advices, and quotations are generally higher, though $2.35 
is yet named for both varieties. 

Peppermint is maintained with a fair show of strength in 
view of the character of recent advices from the west, and sales 
are reported at $2.35, though some in the trade decline to shade 
$2.45. 

Spearmint shares the general firmness of the mint oil, and 
while sales are reported at $2.75 the general range of the mar- 
ket is $2.85. 

Wormseed is a fraction higher owing to continued scarcity, 
the range of the market as to quality being $4.50 to $4.75. 

Gums. 

Aloes, Curacao, have weakened since our last in the face of 
keen competition among holders, and sales are reported at a re- 
duction to 6J4 to 7c; gourds are scarce and 10 to lie is still 
named. 

Arabic sorts are maintained in firm position and we hear of 
nothing offering at under 10 to ioj4c. 

Asafoetida is maintained in steady position despite recent ar- 
rivals, which, however, will not be available for some weeks to 
come. During the interval sales of ordinary quality have been 
reported at $1.50, though the quotation of $2.50 is made for gum 
of pharmacopreial quality. Sales of powdered are reported at $3. 

Camphor is maintained steadily at the previous range of 
prices, and the tendency is upward, though only jobbing sales 
are reported at 42c. 

Chicle has been rather more freely inquired for and the mar- 
ket is steady in tone at our quotation, there being reports pre- 
dicting an early advance at primary sources. 



54 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Roots. 

Berberis aquifolium is scarce and wanted and holders are 
firm in their views at an advance of n to 12c for true. 

Burdock is maintained with more firmness and holders gen- 
erally insist on 6c, though less might be done in some quarters. 

Dandelion, German, is developing increased firmness with the 
steady depletion of stocks, and there are no sellers of desirable 
grades at under 9^c. 

Elecampane is in limited supply on spot and recent arrivals 
are maintained at ioc. 

Golden seal is almost out of market and for the limited avail- 
able supply holders decline to shade $2.75. 

Ipecac continues held at $2.50 for Rio and $2.05 for Cartha- 
gena, but higher prices are likely to prevail shortly. 

Jalap is in easier position and supplies offer more freely at 
25 to 30c as to test. 

Seeds. 

The demand for the different descriptions of druggists' seeds 
has continued of average volume during the interval since our 
last report. Although celery is in advancing tendency abroad, an 
appreciation of a quarter cent being announced, spot quotations 
remain at 18 to i8^c. Levant wormseed is also reported higher in 
European markets, but local dealers do not vary at from 13 to 15c. 
Larkspur continues scarce and wanted, with nothing offering at 
under 55c. Star anise has developed increased strength and sales at 
the close were 19 to 19HC Holders of poppy, both German and 
Dutch, have advanced quotations to the range of 6^4 to 7c and 
7 to 7^4c respectively. Angelica of the new crop has made its 
appearance on the market and we hear of sales at 30c. Quince 
continues in good, consuming demand, and values are steadily 
maintained at the previous range of 60 to 75c. Decorticated 
cardamoms are held more firmly and sales are reported at 70c. 
German fennel is in reduced supply and holders are firmer in 
their views at 13 to 14c. Foenugreek is held and selling at 2^c, 
which is Y2C above the lay down cost. 

Salvar a Blood Remedy. 

The Salvar Medicine Company, of St. Louis, announce that 
Salvar is a liquid, each bottle of which contains a full course of 
treatment of thirty-five or forty days' duration. They announce 
that they will prosecute counterfeiters and imitators. 



A Good Mouth Wash. 

Druggists can safely recommend Lythol as an antiseptic 
mouth wash free from acid. It preserves the teeth by prevent- 
ing fermentation, allaying inflammation and catarrhal conditions 
of the mucous membranes of the eye, nose, mouth and throat, 
and also sore throat and hoarseness. Hudson & Co., 149 West 
Thirty-sixth street, will forward literature on request. 



A Quick Seller at Ten Cents. 

The attractive new style package in which the ten cent size 
of New-Skin is now being put up is quite an improvement over 
the old one and is bound to prove a ready seller. The company 
is making a liberal offer to druggists which is worth looking 
into. Address New-Skin Company, Department F, 98 Grand 
avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., for details, mentioning the American 
Druggist. 



An American Essential Oil Laboratory. 

Ungerer & Co., 273 Pearl street, New York, announce that 
they have engaged the services of a French chemist of excel- 
lent training and wide experience in essential oils to take charge 
of an analytical laboratory in their own offices, where they will 
have examined every oil handled by them and where they will 
have special analyses made for their patrons without charge 
The chemist in question, Albert Torre, has worked for a long 




time under Dr. Conrad Satie, of Jeancard Fils & Co., Cannes, 
France, who will continue to act as Mr. Torre's collaborator. 
Patrons desiring special information or analyses should not hesi- 
tate to write lingerer & Co. for advice and assistance. 

Dispensing Coats. 

Druggists are quick to recognize the advantage of white 
coats over dark clothes at the soda fountain. Weissfeld white 
dispensing coats are made to order, thoroughly shrunk and come 
in a large variety of styles and strictly washable materials. 
Write for swatch card showing styles, materials and prices, free 
on request. They fit properly by mail. Free delivery to all 
parts of the world. Address Weissfeld Brothers, 117 Nassau 
street, New York, mentioning the American Druggist. 

Arco Concave Nail Files. 

A novel and extremely convenient nail file has just been put 
on the market by the Sheffield File Company, of New York, 
and on account of its many advantages over flexible and other 

files, it has met 
with an enthusi- 
astic reception by 
the trade and the 
consumer alike 
' ^ This file, call- 

ed the ''Arco," 
differs from all 
others in that it 
is concave and 
has the teeth cut 
on the concave 
side. It is thus 
a forming file and 
when drawn 
across the nail 
files it to the cor- 
rect curved form. 
Finger nails are 
curved, and this 
file produces a 
curve and not a 
straight line, and 
thus removes at 
once all irregu- 
larities and produces a perfect curve of the nail. Until the cut- 
lers developed the curved nail trimmer, straight scissors were 
used. The inventor of the Arco file has done for the file what 
the cutlers did for the scissors, in making a file which finishes 
the nail to its correct uniform curve. 

On account of the great antiquity of the file, records of the 
existence of which go back over 3000 years, it hardly seems be- 
lievable that any radically new form of file could be devised. 
But the novelty of the concave file cannot be questioned, for 
broad patents have been granted to the inventor by the United 
States covering all sorts of concave files. Concave machine 
files are being made, and the company is also putting on the 
market pocket cue files for dressing the tips of billiard cues. 

The special advantages of the concave file for manicure pur- 
poses are so apparent that they sell quickly wherever seen. 
Arco files are exquisitely made of the best tool steel, beautifully 
cut, and after being carefully tempered, are polished to the high- 
est possible finish. For display purposes they are mounted on 
attractive cards, and the company, with a knowledge gained 
from experience, absolutely guarantees their ready sale when so 
displayed. 

Believing themselves justified in the assumption that the 
concave file will eventually supersede the flexible file, as the lat- 
ter did the old stiff manicure file, the company intends at all 
times to maintain the high character of its product and thus 
•guarantee the satisfaction of its customers. 



The Arco fits the curve. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RErQRD. 



55 





MOIST 

Parke Davis s Co 

Detroit. Mich .U S A 

UHIjf R 1,1- lfii-111 AU [iW-'^j 





> 1 • 




T cN YARDS - '/2 ! NCH 

"-WUptTRtATtDWITH A S* SOU""' 
*«-.>_.. PREPARED BY i.tli 

- :^vis &Co.. Detroit.Micn v , 





^MIBINE G0 l 
STERILIZE* 

MOIST 

Parke Davis s Co 

Detroit. Mich. .U S 1 . 






ANESTHONE TAPE 

MCtTHETlC. Ht.OSlMIC asruVOfin 




These gauzes and tapes have made a 
pronounced hit with physicians. 

We are pushing them in a hundred med- 
ical and surgical journals in January. 

Pharmacists who have not already done 
so will do well to order the full line at once. 



CHLORETONE GAUZE 

One square yard and five square yards, in 
glass jars. 

FORMIDINE GAUZE 

One square yard and five square yards, in glass 
jars and in paper cartons. 

FORMIDINE TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

ADRENALIN TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

PLAIN TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

ANESTHONE TAPE 

One-half inch wide, two and one-half yards 
long, in glass vials. 



Parke, Davis & Co< 

Home Offices and Laboratories, 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST zvhen writing to Advertisers. 



56 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



The Pastometer for the Home Pasteurization of 

Milk. 

The pastometer, which comes to us from Denmark, the most 
progressive country in the world in all matters relating to the 
production, care and use of milk, is being introduced in the 
United States by the Thermoton Company, of 6 Cliff street, 
New York. The apparatus is very simple indeed, consisting of 




In process of pasteurization. 



a needle set within a metal tube, in the bottom of which is an 
alloy melting at a definite temperature (for pasteurization 162° 
F.). When this temperature is reached the alloy melts, releasing 
the needle, which rises over an inch through the agency of a 
spring, thus giving notice that the required temperature has been 
reached. The apparatus is very simple in construction, can easily 
be washed, and is very durable. By its use there is no need for 
watching the operation closely, and there is no occasion for the 
use of a thermometer, which is always liable to be broken. 

The apparatus was shown before the Section in Diseases of 
Children of the American Medical Association at the meeting 
held in St. Louis last June, by Dr. Henry L. Coit, of Newark, 
N. J., who said, in describing it. that "its entire simplicity of 
construction, its scientific accuracy in results obtained, the ease 
with which it is operated and cleaned, and its inexpensiveness, 
recommend it for universal use. It is now being used extensive- 
ly throughout Denmark and Germany, not only for the home 
pasteurization and sterilization of milk, but also for the cooking 
of meats and other foodstuffs. It is vouched for in its scientific 
construction and utility by several European laboratories and 
individual foreign experts, and by the Lederle Laboratories of 
New York City. The certificate of the latter institution, a certi- 
fied copy of which I have here with me, shows that twenty-four 
needles were tested and were all released at the given tempera- 
ture, viz., 162 0 F." 

The increasing appreciation of the value of pasteurization 



by members of the medical profession opens out a wide field for 
such a simple but effective device as this, which retails at $1. 

Of the recent conference of the Milk Committee of the United 
States and Canada, held in New York, Dr. Charles E. North 
said that : "Man after man took the platform and gave his testi- 
mony in favor of two kinds of milk and two only, as being safe 
for human consumption: (1) Milk in a raw state produced un- 
der sanitary conditions from tuberculin tested cattle; (2) all 
other milk to be thoroughly pasteurized." 

The Thermoton Company, of 6 Cliff street, New York, will 
be glad to send descriptions of this new apparatus and adver- 
tising matter for distribution by the retailer. The apparatus can 
be obtained through the jobbers generally or direct from the 
Thermoton Company. 



Five Essentials. 

The rapid- growth in the popularity of antitoxins and vac- 
cines for the treatment of disease makes it essential for every 
well equipped pharmacy to carry the remedies in stock. The H. 
K. Mulford Company, of Philadelphia, who have specialized in 
these preparations, list five of them as essential to every com- 
plete drug stock. These are the Mulford diphtheria antitoxin, 
the Mulford tetanus antitoxin, the Mulford tuberculin, and Neis- 
ser-Bacterin for the diagnosis of obscure cases of arthritis and 
the treatment of gonorrhoeal infections and the Staphylo-Bacteria 
for the treatment of acne, furunculosis and pus infections gen- 
erally. Working, bulletins, showing the application of the^e rem- 
edies, will be sent to applicants who mention the American 
Druggist when writing the II. K. Mulford Company, Philadel- 
phia. 



Two Million Five Hundred Thousand Women. 

The midwinter advertising campaign of the E. Burnham 
toilet preparations will keep them prominently before 2,500000 
buying women. The druggist who is alive to his opportunities 
will reap individual benefit from this advertising by using the 
sales helps, which will be furnished free of cost by E. Burnham, 
Department C, 119, 67 East Washington street, Chicago. These 
helps include a beautiful decalcomania transfer window sign. 15 
by 12 inches in size, in three colors. A liberal bonus of free 
goods is also offered. 



An Ideal Hot Soda Fountain Drink. 

Horlick's Malted Milk makes an invigorating, refreshing and 
nutritious drink. It may be served plain with egg, or in 
many other combinations. It makes a good, rich hot delicious 
drink. Write Horlick's Malted Milk, Racine, Wis., for booklet, 
direction card, and advertising matter, which they furnish on 
request, mentioning the American Druggist. 



Antikamnia Calendar. 

The well known products of the Antikamnia Chemical Com- 
pany, among which are antikamnia tablets and antikamnia and 
codeine tablets, prove quick sellers. They relieve pain and can 
be safely recommended. To druggist and clerks who will send 
lists of friends and customers they will mail free their 1 pi 1 
Antikamnia calendar. When writing the company mention the 
American Druggist. 

Perfumes from Concrete Flower Oil. 

Perfumes made from Wblmark concrete flower oils last and 
they are reasonable in cost. Their odors suit the most delicate 
taste. Write f< r their new price list and formula book which 
contains much of interest to the druggist. Address Wolmark 
Chemical Company, [13 Sixth avenue. Xew York. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



57 



How to Sell 
Diamond Dyes 

Tell all your customers that no one dye can dye every material and give 
the very best results. However, the Diamond Dyes which come in an 
envelope marked with this statement "Colors One Pound of Cotton, Linen 
or Mixed Goods" will color every material well. In fact they will dye any 
material singly or every material at once — in one bath, at one operation — 
'better than any of the so-c alled "all purpose" dyes made. 

Butfto get the very best results on wool or silk no other dyes made can equal 
the Diamond Dyes which are made for those high-gra le materials. 

Diamond Dyes 

Textile manufacturers use one dye for cotton or linen and another for 
wool or silk. For cotton and linen are made from vegetable fibres, while 
wool and silk are made from animal fibres. Mixed goods are usually 60% 
to 80% vegetable fibres, so they are classed by dye experts with cotton 
and linen. 

Home dyers should dye as textile manufacturers do, i. e., use two kinds of 
dyes, one for each class of materials. Diamond Dyes are the only home 
dyes which permit them to do so. 



Diamond Dyes Now Come in Blue 
and White Envelopes 

To help your customers distinguish between 
the two kinds of Diamond Dyes we are now 
putting the Diamond Dyes for Wool or Silk 
in a Blue envelope. This Blue envelope is 
plainly marked with this statement, "Colors 
one pound of Wool or Silk, or a Mixture of 
Wool and Silk Goods." 

The Diamond Dyes for Cotton, Linen or 
Mixed Goods are put up — as heretofore — in 
a White envelope, marked with this state- 
ment. "Colors one pound of Cotton, Linen 
or Mixed Goods.'' 

But if you still have in stock some of our 
dyes for Wool or Silk in White envelopes, 
sell them. For our advertising will explain 

Wells & Richardson 



to your customers that you may have some 
of them on hand in such a package. 



$200,000 Spent for Advertising in 
1910— More in 1911 

During the year 1910 we spent $200,000 ad- 
vertising Diamond Dyes. This year we 
shall increase our appropriation. And re- 
member, you dealers must profit by our ad- 
vertising before we do. 

Diamond Dyes are the "Standard of the 
World." Sell only Diamond Dyes. For 30 
years druggists have been making steady 
profits from them. 

And never forget — every imitation that is 
sold undermines the confidence of your trade 
in home dyeing and kills possible profits. 




Burlington, Vermont 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST zvhen writing to Advertisers. 



58 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



He Got a Thousand Dollars for an Idea. 

Through our advertising columns the Simmons Hardware 
Company, of St. Louis, offered a prize of $1,000 for the best 
suggestion in the line of selling and advertising plans for their 
Keen Kutter safety razor. This prize of $i,ooo in gold has been 
awarded to C. A. Baker, Mountain Home, Ark. We print the 
portrait of Mr. Baker, who received his $1,000 in gold. 

Although no prizes were offered excepting the capital prize of 
$1,000, the Simmons Hardware Company was so much pleased 




C. A. BAKER. 

Mountain Home, Ark., winner of the thousand dollar prize in the 
Keen-Kutter razor contest. 

with the interest manifested in the contest that, in addition to 
the $ 1,000 prize, they awarded twenty-five $20 gold pieces, and 
in addition 100 gold plated Keen Kutter safety razors valued at 
$5 to a hundred other contestants whose suggestions were 
deemed worthy of being placed on a roll of honor. On another 
page we print a list of the winners of the $20 gold pieces. It 
is interesting to note that the bright ideas have all come from 
the smaller towns or cities and not from the great centres of 
populaion. 

Hepptine. 

Under the name Hepptine is prescribed pure physiologic gas- 
tric juice put up by Dr. Maurice Hepp. The preparation is one 
which is being most cordially commended by American physicians 
in the treatment of dyspepsia. Literature concerning its uses will 
be furnished on application to the Laboratories of Applied Physi- 
ology of France, 149 Broadway, New York. 



Safe Fire Insurance. 

Druggists would do well to look very carefully into the worth 
of the American Druggists' Fire Insurance Company, which is the 
only capital stock druggists' fire insurance .company doing busi- 
ness throughout the United States. Their policy insures against 
fire loss and assures prompt and just settlement. They have a 
licensed representative in twenty-five States who will be pleased 
to give full details. Write The American Druggists' Fire In- 
surance Company, 1215-1216 Mercantile Library Building, Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio, mentioning this journal. 



The Fairchild Products. 

The Fairchild products appeal to the professional interest of 
the pharmacist. They are scientific in design and are of definite 
standardized quality. Panopepton, the standardized "balanced" 
food has proved a good seller, and druggists feel sure of recom- 
mending it. Write Fairchild Brothers & Foster, New York, for 
further particulars regarding their products, mentioning the 
American Druggist. 



A Speedy Money Maker. 

Notwithstanding the exploitation of the host of cough 
syrups on the market, Syrup of Cocillana Compound, which was 
placed before the medical profession by Parke, Davis & Co. 
two or three years ago, has attained a wonderful degree of pop- 
ularity among the physicians of the United States. The syrup 
is attractive in appearance, agreeable in taste, unusual both in 
name and composition, and the n'ame does not suggest its uses- 
to the lay mind. It is therefore particularly well fitted for pre- 
scription use. and it is being vigorously and extensively adver- 
tised to the medical profession, so the druggist may look for an 
increase in the prescriptions ordering it. 



A Rapid Package Seller. 

Elsewhere in this issue is printed an advertisement of the 
Gem package sealer, used in sealing packages, mending bills, etc., 
by means of a gummed tape. These gummed tapes are fur- 
nished in cloth or in paper, plain or printed, as desired. The 
druggist can have one of these sealers with a tape bearing his 
name and address for use in sealing all kinds of packages in- 
stead of using strings or bands. The tape adheres immediately 
when applied, and is really more economical in use than twine 
and much more sightly. Descriptive circulars and samples of 
the printed tapes will be furnished on application by the Re- 
liable Gummed Tape Company, 90 Cypress avenue, New York, 



Thalosen, the Laxative de Luxe. 

Thalosen is a laxative tablet of phenolphthalein. senna, sul- 
phur, licorice and sugar. The tablets are agreeable to the taste 
and effective in results. Each tablet contains one grain of 

phenolphthalein, and 
is divided into four 
segments, so that it 
may be readily sub- 
divided if a dose 

smaller than one grain is desired. Thalosen is being extensively 
advertised to the medical profession, and retail druggists every- 
where may look forward with certainty to having a demand for 
it. It is carried in stock by all druggists. The Abbott Alka- 
loidal Company, Ravenswood, 111., will be glad to send particulars 
regarding its use. 




The Original Allegretti Chocolate Creams. 

The dove as a symbol of peace is a particularly appropriate 
trade mark for the Allegretti chocolate creams, for many a man 
has made his peace at home with a pound or two of these de- 
licious peace offerings. The genuine Allegretti chocolate creams, 

the original and famous 
kind, are distinguished by 
the dove trade mark, which 
is reproduced herewith. 
None are genuine which 
do not bear the dove trade mark. Druggists will find that this 
line of candies will appeal to their most fastidious customers. Dis- 
tributors are wanted in every section, and enterprising druggists 
will be offered very favorable terms on these goods. For par- 
ticulars address The Allegretti Chocolate Cream Company. Q2" 
Broadway, New York, or 217 State street. Chicago. 




AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



59 



HEARN 



WEST FOURTEENTH STREET 
NEW YORK 



NO Sir BUT 



EVERYTHING 
IN 

DRY GOODS 



THE LUER ALL GLASS HYPO SYRINGE 



The Ideal 

Aseptic 

Syringe 

Price Greatly 
Reduced 




May be 
Retailed at 
$1.75 and 
up, depending 
on style of 
case 



LIBERAL DISCOUNTS TO THE TRADE 
Write lor Prices 



BECTON, DICKINSON & CO., 



Sole 
Makers, 



Rutherford, N. J. 



IS 1898 

The London (England) Lancet, made a careful examination of 

SCOTT'S EMULSION 

and reported: 'The preparation fulfills ALL the requirements and presents 
ALL the conditions of a very satisfactory Emulsion." 

IN 1910 

Lederle Laboratories (New York City), examined it and reported finding 
49.80% (by volume) of Cod Liver Oil, 14.73% of Glycerine, Solution of 
Hypophosphites of Lime and Soda 35.47%, no Alcohol, and the calorific 
power to be 4869 per gram. 



SCOTT ft BOWNE, - - BLOOMFIELD, N. J. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when zvriting to Advertisers. 



6o 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



A. C. C. Chemicals. 

The Albany Chemical Company, Albany, N. Y., manufacture 
a full line of chemicals, medicinal, photographic and for the arts. 
Their products have grown steadily in popularity and rank high 
in the esteem of users. If they are not handled by your own 
jobber the manufacturers will be pleased to correspond with you 
direct. 



A Sixty=six Percent. Profit Plan. 

Mrs. Gervaise Graham, 1475 Michigan avenue, Chicago, would 
be glad to send details of her 66 percent, profit plan to cor- 
respondents mentioning the American Druggist. Her plan in- 
cludes an active campaign on behalf of the individual retailer by 
means of circulars mailed to his patrons. Enterprising druggists 
everywhere should write Mrs. Graham for details of this at- 
tractive plan. 

A Seidlitz Powder Specialist. 

Charles R. Doane, 1193 Atlantic avenue, Brooklyn, is a seid- 
litz powder specialist. For many years he has devoted his atten- 
tion exclusively to the putting up of seidlitz powders, and by the 
aid of the most improved machinery he is able to put up his 
eeidlitz powder at a cost which defies competition. Before plac- 
ing your orders for seidlitz mixture or for seidlitz powders write 
Mr. Doane for quotations, and when writing mention the Ameri- 
can Druggist. 



Vaseline Atomizers. 

The glass bottles of the vaseline atomizers made by Whitall 
Tatum & Co. are especially annealed to stand changes in tem- 
perature, so that medicated vaseline or heavy oils may be melted 
in them either over a flame or in hot water and applied hot. The 
bulbs are of the best quality of rubber, and every detail is worked 
out so as to make them satisfactory alike to consumer and to 
seller. Druggists who have not yet received the 191 1 catalogue 
of the Whitall Tatum Company should write for one at once 
to the New York office, 46 Barclay street. 



Poultices Without the Trouble. 

The nurse who has been called upon to keep a hot flaxseed 
poultice applied to a patient is in the best position to realize the 
advantages of antiphlogistine. Instead of a constantly recur- 
ring, disagreeable task involving the annoyance and harassment 
of the patient which is incident to the effort to keep a hot flax- 
seed poultice in place, the modern method is to apply antiphlo- 
gistine, which, unlike the hot flaxseed poultice, "stays put." For 
the druggist there is a lot more profit in the antiphlogistine than 
in the flaxseed poultice, for the nurse less work, for the patient 
less worry and better results. It is put up in four sizes, at $4. 
$6, $10 and $20, respectively. For free advertising matter ad- 
dress the Denver Chemical Manufacturing Company, New York. 



Fixing Responsibility. 

The cash register with the individual record for each clerk 
enables the druggist to know exactly what each clerk amounts to 
as a salesman. The records show both the number of customers 
waited on and the total amount sold, and the one in the drug 
store is almost as important as the other. The clerks who are 
alert, energetic and competent will welcome the advent of such 
a cash register, as is illustrated in the advertisement of the 
National Cash Register Company on page 7 of this issue, for 
it will place before their employer every night a full record of 
the activity of the day. Such a cash register is an important help 
to any retail druggist. Write the National Cash Register Com- 
pany, Dayton. Ohio, for full particulars regarding these individual 
record registers. 



Pharmacy Board Questions Answered. 

John Joseph McVey, Philadelphia, publishes a book of answers 
to questions asked by pharmaceutical state boards which will be 
most helpful to every candidate for examination. The book is 
an octavo of 303 pages, and will be sent postage paid on receipt 
of $1.50, the net price. 

A Talcum Powder Seller. 

Henry K. Wampole & Co., of Philadelphia, put up a very 
handsome line of talcum powders in different sizes to retail at 
10, 15 and 25 cents each, with a margin of ;oo percent, profit. 
The druggist's own name is on the label. Write for free sam- 
ples to Henry K. Wampole & Co., Philadelphia. 

Headquarters for Italian Specialties. 

The rapid growth of the Italian colony in the United States 
— there are 600,000 Italians in New York alone, which is more 
Italians than live in Naples or in Rome — has created a demand 
for Italian medicine and specialties which can always be sup- 
plied through J. Personeni, 496 West Broadway. Every drug- 
gist should have a copy of his catalogue, which can be had for 
the asking. 



A Popular Prescription. 

Anusol suppositories have grown steadily in popular favor 
among the medical profession, and as a consequence the drug- 
gist more and more frequently receives prescriptions for "Suppos. 
Hamiorrhoid. Anusoli." This means the product supplied by 
Schering & Glatz, New York, who will be glad to furnish lit- 
erature and quotations to correspondents mentioning the Ameri- 
can Druggist. 



The Lilly Policy on Pharmaceuticals. 

Eli Lilly & Co., of Indianapolis, have adopted a policy of co- 
operation which places all retail druggists on the same basis, 
gives them all the same discount, and insures the distribution of 
their products through the retailer. The Lilly policy is "to aid 
the retailer in every way possible in his effort to build up and 
maintain a drug prescription trade." In this way they build up 
the business of the retailer along with their own. Druggists 
who do not handle the Lilly line of pharmaceuticals should 
write to Eli Lilly & Co., of Indianapolis, for details of their pol- 
icy and how it works. 



labelim 



Ink for Prescription Labels. 

Few druggists realize the importance of having ink for use 
prescriptions which is permanent and durable. 
There is no telling when a pre- 
scription is sent out what sort of treat- 
ment the label may receive. If the label 
is written with Davids' Electro Chemical 
Writing Fluid time will not fade it nor 
water wash it out. Moreover, this is the 
kind of ink that the druggist can sell with 
satisfaction to the customer and profit to 
himself. It is perfectly clean, limpid, free 
from glutinous matter and will not mold 
or thicken. This is one of the staples in 
the $25 assortment with which the Thad- 
deus Davids Company, of Brooklyn, fur- 
nish an attractive show case free of 
charge. The company is now advertis- 
ing extensively throughout the United 
States to the general public, and the drug- 
gist who puts in a stock of the Davids products will find no dif- 
ficulty in disposing of them. 




AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



6 1 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Commencing with the New Year, 191 1, 

Fellows 9 

Hypophosphites 

will be supplied in SMALL BOTTLES, retailing at 
$1.00, as well as in those of the Regular ($1.50) Size. 

The SMALL BOTTLES will contain 
about half the quantity of the Regular Large 
Bottle, and they will be obtainable 
from all Jobbers. 



INSTEAD OF COURT PLASTER 



Package 
Difficulties 
Solved 



The old hard-to-open hermetically sealed ioc. New-Skin paekagt 
has been replaced with a new easy-to-open package with the fol- 
lowing features: Evaporation-proof aluminum screw cap. Glass 
rod, instead of brush, on cork. Paper carton instead of brass 
box. No more complaints about the New-Skin package. 



NEWSKIN CO., 



DEPT. 
P. 



98 GRAND AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y 



Quality Standard 

Fritzsctie Brothers, New York 



Ditman's 
SEA-SALT 



FOR PRODUCING 
REAL SEA WATER 
AT HOME 



Murray's 
Charcoal 
Tablets 

HAVE BEEN THE 
STANDARD FOR OVER 
25 YEARS 

A. J. DITMAN 

2 Barclay Street, NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



— — '■ ■ ■ ^ ^ e 

/f should be understood that the prices quoted in this column are strictly those current in the wholesale drug market, 
and that higher prices are paid for retail lots. The quality of goods frequently necessitates a considerable range of prices. 



Drugs, Chemicals, &c. 



Acetanilld lb. 

Acetone lb. 

Acetphenetidin (D. S. 

P. phenace t In) . ■ lb- 
Acid: Acetic Com'l.lb. 
U. S. P. 30 p. c. 

Acetic, Glacial 

Benzoic, Ger lb. 

Eng. 

Boric, Cryst.. 
'* powd. 

Oarbol, cryst., blk.lb. 
lb. bottle lb. 

Ohrysophanlc 

Oltric, dom lb. 

Gallic lb. 

Muriatic, C. P. 

Nitric, C. P... 

Oxalic 

Phosphoric 

Picric .... 

Pyrogallic 

Salicylic 

Stearic . . . 

Sulphuric, 98%.. .lb. 

Tartaric, crystals.lb. 
powdered lb. 

Tannic, D. S. P. .lb. 

Agar Agar 

Alcohol, D.S.P., grain 

Wood, 98% 

Denatured, 188 pf.bbl. 

half-bbl. 

Aloln lb. 

Alnm, Lump ..100 1b. 

Ground 100 lb. 

Ammon. carb 

" bromide, blk. 
Iodide, ..blk. 
Arrowroot, Bermuda. lb. 

St. Vincent in bbl.lb. 
Arsenic, Bed lb. 

White lb. 

Balm of Gllead Buds.lb. 



.20%® .22 
.14%® .16 



. .oz. 
. ..lb. 
. .lb. 



.lb. 
..lb. 
....lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 



.80 @ 
.01%® 

4.00 @ 
.12 @ 
.27 ® 
.12 @ 
.07 @ 
.07%® 
.07%® 
.13 ® 

3.28 ® 
.38%® 
.50 @ 
.05%® 
.07%® 
.07%® 
.19%® 
.40 ® 

1.00 @ 
.31 ® 
.10%® 
.01%® 
.29%® 
.29%® 



.85 
.02 
4.90 
.12% 
.30 
.12% 
.07% 
.09 
.08 
.15 

!39 
.52 
.08% 
.09% 
.07% 
.24 
.45 
1.05 
.33 
• 11% 
.02 
.29% 
.30 



.58 


@ 


.60 


.60 


I 


.75 


2.54 


@ 


2.87 


.81 


.53 


.41 




.42 


.45 


@ 


.47 


.66 


® 


.70 


1.75 


@ 


1.80 


1.85 


| 


1.90 


.08 




.08% 


.35 


® 
I 


.36 


3.00 


3.05 




® 


.50 



Balaam Copaiba, 


South 






Amer 


...lb. 


.39 ® 


.40 


Para 


...lb. 


.47 @ 


.48 


Fir, Canada 


. .gal. 


4.60 @ 


4.70 


Fir, Oregon . . 


. .gal. 


.90 @ 


.95 




1.82%® 


1.85 


Tolu 


...lb. 


.20 @ 


.22 


Bark, Angostura 


...lb. 


.15 @ 


.20 


Buckthorn . . . 


...lb. 


.04%® 


.05 


Cascara Sagrada..lb. 


.07%® 


.09 


Cascarllla . . . 


....lb. 


.14 @ 


.15 






.09 @ 


.10 


Cotton root . 


...lb. 


.14 @ 


.16 


Cramp 


... lb. 


.07 @ 


• 07% 


Elm, select . 


. ..lb. 


.17 @ 


.18 


Pine, white . 


...lb. 


.05 @ 


.06 


Prickly Ash . 




... @ 


.75 


Sassafras 


Ab. 


.16 @ 


.20 


Soap— whole . 


....lb. 


.06%® 


.07 


Cut 




.08%® 


.09 


Crushed . . . 


...lb. 


.07%® 


.07% 


White Pine . 


. . .lb. 


.04%® 


.05 


Wild Cherry 


...lb. 


.06 @ 


.09 



Bay Bum 

Bismuth, citrate. . ..lb. 

" ammon. clt.lb. 

" salicylate ..lb. 

" subnlt. ...blk. 

" subcarb. ...lb. 

" subgallate. .lb. 

" subslodlde 

Bleaching Powder, Eng. 

Blue Vitriol 1 K> 

Borax, powdered. . .id. 

Crystals lb. 

Brimstone, crude, .ton. 22.00 

Bromine, bulk lb. .25 

Burgundy Pitch ...lb. 

Cacao Butter, blk 

" 12 lb.boxes. 

Caffeine lb. 

Calcium hypophosph.lb. 
Cantharides, Chlnese.lb. 
powdered 

Russian, whole... lb. 

powdered 

Cassia Buds lb. 

Castor Oil, No.l.bbl.lb. 
Caustic Soda. . .100 lb. 

Chalk, preclp lb. 

Chloral Hydrate, crys- 
tals, bulk lb. 

Crusts, blk lb. 

Chloroform, bulk ..lb. 
Cinchonldine Sulph.oz. 
Cocaine, Muriate ..oz. 

Codeine, Solph oz. 

Cod Liver Oil, Norweg. 

Newfoundland ..bbl. 
Colocynth, Trieste.. lb. 

Spanish lb. 

Copperas 100 lbs. 

Creosote, Beechwood . . 
Cream Tartar, powd. lb. 
Cnbeb Berries, xx.lb. 

Powdered lb. 

Cottle Bone, Trieste. lb. 

French lb. 

Jewelers', large., lb. 
" small., lb. 

Dextrin lb. 

Dragon's Bl'd, lump. lb. 

reeds lb. 

Bpsom Salts ...bags. 

Barrels 

Ergot, Russian ....lb. 

Spanish lb. 

Ether 1900 lb. 

Washed lb. 

C. S. P 1880 lb. 




.78 


@ .78 


.78 


© .78 


.27 


® .35 


.10 




3.35 


@ 3.55 


3.70 


@ 3.90 


33.00 


©35.00 


28.00 


®29.00 


.29 


@ .30 


.18 


@ .20 


.65 


® .80 


.60 


© .70 




Flowers, Arnica. .. .lb. 

Calendula lb. 

Chamomile, Romanlb. 

German 

Hungarian ....lb. 

Elder 

Insect Powder ...lb. 

Lavender lb. 

Select lb. 

Rose lb. 

SafTron, Amer.... lb. 

Valencia. 11). 

Formaldehyde lb. 

Glycerin, C.P.drms.lb. 

" cans . . . .lb. 
Grains of Paradise. lb. 

Guarana lb. 

Gums: Aloes, Cape 

" Curaeoa 

In gourds 

" Socotrine . . lb. 
Arabic, 1st pkd..lb. 

2d pkd. . .lb. 
" sorts ... .lb. 

Asafoetlda lb. 

Benzoin, Sumatra. lb. 

Siam lb. 

Camphor, refl'd...lb. 

Foreign lb. 

Chicle lb. 

Gamboge lb. 

Guaiac lb. 

Kino lb. 

Mastic lb. 

Myrrh lb. 

Select 

Ollbanum, sifts.. .lb. 

Sandarac lb. 

Senegal, pkd. ...lb. 
Tragacanth, Alep.lst 
" 2d 

" Turkey. 1st 
2d 

Haarlem Oil gross 

Ichthyol lb. 

Indigo lb. 

Iodine, resub 2.60 



.10%® 
.28 @ 
.19 @ 
... @ 
.18 @ 
.16 @ 
.30 @ 
.07 @ 
.14 ® 
.60 @ 
.19 ® 
10.25 

.08%® .10 
.25%® .26 
.26%© .27 
.25 @ .27 
2.20 ® 2.30 
.08%® .09 
.07%® 
.10 



11 

30 
23 
35 
24 
18 
50 
0(1 

16 
08 
20 
@10.50 



.22 
.25 
.19 
.10 

1.75 
.30 

1.10 
.42 
.42 
.48 
.65 
.26 
.25 
.46 
.18 
.18 
.05 
.18 
.11 
.77 
.55 
.75 
.40 

2.25 

4.00 
.90 



07% 
.11 
.24 
.35 
.23 
.10% 



Iodoform lb. 

Iron, citrate, O.S.P.lb. 

" and ammon. clt.lb. 

and ammon. citrate 
(green scales) . . . 

and quinine citrate. lb. 

phosphate, scales. lb. 

pyrophosph. scales.lb. 

quinine and strych- 
nine citrate ...lb. 
Isinglass, Amer.... lb. 

Russian lb. 

Juniper Berries ...lb. 



2.98 
.49 
.46 

.86 
1.18 
.46 
.46 

1.78 
.72 
2.75 

.02%® 



.35 
1.25 
.43% 
.45 
.50 
.70 
.30 
.30 
.48 
.18 
.25 
.06 
.17 
.13 
.80 
.65 
@ .80 
® .50 
@ 2.40 
® 4.25 
® 1.25 
@ 2.68 
@ 3.00 



® 



© 



® 



1.28 



1.88 
.78 
® 3.00 



Leaves, Aconite 07%@ 



Althen 

Belladonna lb. 

Buehu, short lb. 

" long .... lb. 
Cannabis Indica .lb. 
Coca, Truxillo ..lb. 
Huanuco ..lb. 

Damiana lb. 

Digitalis lb. 

Euphorbia pil 

Crhidelia robusta.lb. 

Horehound lb. 

Hyoscyamus lb. 

Jaborandl lb. 

Matlco lb. 

Pichi 

Pulsatilla lb. 

Rose, Red lb. 

Senna, pkd. whole. lb. 

Alexandria, Nat. lb. 

gar. and sifted. lb. 

Tlnnevelly lb. 

Alexandria, sift. lb. 
Stramonium lb. 



.05 
-16%® 

.75 @ 

.50 @ 

1.23 @ 

.30 @ 

.40 @ 

... ® 

.14 @ 

... @ 

.15 ® 

.07 ® 
.08%® 

.10 @ 



.15 

.18 ® 
.07 @ 
.60 @ 
.21 @ 
.08 @ 
.16 @ 
.06%® 
.07%® 
.08 



Thyme 03%® 



Dva ursi lb. 

Verba Santa ....lb. 

Licorice — mass lb. 

Spanish lb. 

Imp'ted mass, Span- 
ish lb. 

Stick, Calabria ..lb. 

Domestic lb. 

Llthla, carbonate. . .lb. 

" citrate lb. 

Lupulln, Ger lb. 

Lycopodium Ib. 

Magnesia, carb lb. 

Manna, large flk...lh. 

Small flake lb. 

Menthol, Japanese, .lb. 
Mercurials (50 Ib. lots) 

Blue Pill lb. 

Calomel lb. 

Corr. Sublim. ...lb. 
Merc, and Chalk. lb. 

Ointment 

Red Precip lb. 

White " lb. 

Morphine, bulk ....oz. 

Eighths oz. 

Moss, Iceland lb. 

Irish, bleached . .lb. 
Naphthalene, flake, lb. 

Ball lb. 

Nux Vomica lb. 

Oil Anls» lb. 

Almond, bit.. Eng. lb. 
Sweet, true . . .lb. 
bit., artificial, .lb. 
peach kernels 



.03%i 
.15 © 
.10 ® 
.16%® 

® 



.03 
.08 
.05% 
.18% 
.80 
.56 
1.23 
.35 
.45 
.35 
.15 
.30 

.08 
.09 
.11 
.16 
.20 
.08 
.65 
.22 
.09 
.16 
.12 
.08 
.09 
.04 
.04 
.16 
.12 
.20 



.18 
.25 

.16%® 
.65 @ 
.90 @ 
.18 @ 
.43 @ 
• 05%@ 

'.51 
3.45 



.24 
.28 
.20% 
.66 
1.10 
.25 
.45 
.07 
® 1.00 
.65 
3.50 



Bay 
Bergamot 
Cajuput . 
Camphor 
Ca raway 
Cassia . . , 
U. S. I 



. .lb. 
..lb. 
....lb. 
....lb. 
....lb. 
....lb. 



.38 @ 
.81 ® 
• 72 @ 
.38 @ 
.44 @ 
.92 @ 
.99 @ 
3.10 @ 
3.35 @ 
.05 © 
.07%® 
.02%® 
.02%© 
.02%® 
1.20 ® 
3.25 ® 
.55 © 
.45 © 
.25 
1.90 
3.90 
.50 

.08%® 
.95 @ 
.75 ® 
1.20 ® 



.40 
.85 
.76 
.41 
.46 
.96 
1.01 
3.20 
3.45 
.06 
.08 
.02% 
.02% 
.03 
1.22% 

f4.75 
.60 
® .85 
® .27% 
© 2.26 
® 4.00 
® .65 
.09% 
1.00 
.80 
1.25 



Oils — Cont'd. 

Cedar, pure lb. .75 @ .80 

red lb. .15 @ .17 

Cltronella lb. .24 @ .25% 

Cloves, bud 97 ® 1.02% 

Copaiba lb. 1.15 @ 1.20 

Coriander lb 5.25 © 5.75 

Croton lb. .65 ® Til 

Cubeb lb. 3.75 & 4.00 

Eucalyptus lb. .40 ® .60 

Geranium lb. 3.50 @ 4.00 

Lavender, flowers. lb. 1.85 @ 2.25 

Lemon lb. .80 ® .85 

Lemongrass lb. 1.40 ® 1.50 

Llualoe lb. 2.85 @ 3.00 

Linseed 90 @ .91 

boiled 91 @ .92 

Mustard lb. 3.00 ® 4.00 

Myrbane lb. .06%® .07 

Neroll lb. 50.00 @70.00 

Nutmeg Ib. .70 © .80 

Olive 3.50 ® 4.00 

Orange, sweet ..lb. 2.20 @ 2.35 
Orange, bitter ..lb. 2.35 © 2.50 

Origanum lb. .18 @ .22 

Pennyroyal lb. 1.20 © l.mi 

Peppermint, tins . . 2.30 @ 2.50 
" cases. . 2.75 ® 3.00 

Petit.grain, French. lb. 4.75 @ 5.00 
So. Amer.lb. 2.10 @ 2.50 

Pimento lb. 1.80 @ 1.90 

Rose oz. 6.50 @ 6.75 

Rosemary lb. .62%® .80 

Sandalwood lb. 3.00 @ 3.25 

Sassafras lb. .80 @ .82% 

Artificial. lb. .27 ® .29 

Safrol lb. .38 @ .40 

Spearmint lb. 3.00 ® 3.10 

Tansy lb. 2.00 @ 2.25 

Thyme lb. 1.00 @ 1.20 

Wintergreen, leaf. lb. 4.25 @ 4.50 

Artificial lb. .33 ® .35 

Sweet Birch ...lb. 1.50 @ 1.68 
Wood (Chinese) . .lb. .07%® ... 

Wormseed lb. 4.50 @ ... 

Wormwood lb. 7.00 ® 7.50 

Opium, Nat — cases.. lb. 4.80 © 4.85 

Jobbing 4.85 ® 4.90 

Powdered ..lb. 6.60 @ 6.70 
Orange peel, bit. . .lb. .03 @ .04 

Sweet lb. .04%® .10 

Petrolatum 03 @ .08 

Phenolphthalein ...lb. 1.45 @ ... 

Podophyllin 3.25 @ 3.50 

Potassium acetate.. lb. .17 @ .18 

bicarbonate 07%® .08% 

bichromate 07%@ .07% 

bromide, gran 25 @ .26 

cryst 27 @ .28 

chlorate, cryst 08%® .09% 

powd 08%® .09% 

cyanide 20 @ .21 

hypophosphite 65 @ .69 

iodide, bulk 2.10 @ 2.15 

permanganate ...lb. .10 @ .10% 
Prickly Ash Berries. . .25 @ .30 
Quicksilver, flask... lb. .58 @ .60 

Quinine, bulk oz. .14 @ ... 

German oz. .14 @ ... 

German, outside.. oz. ... ® .14 

Java oz. .13%® .13iv, 

Rochelle Salts lb. .18 @ .18% 

Root, Aconite lb. .10 @ .10% 

Alkanet lb. .08 ® .06% 

Althea, cut lb. .15 ® .20 

Arnica lb. .35 @ .40 

Belladonna lb. .12 @ .14 

Blood 08 ® .09 

Calamus lb. .07 @ .08 

Calamus, bl'ch'd..lb. .23 @ .25 

Oalumba lb. .10 ® .12 

Colchicum lb. .11 @ .12 

Dandelion, Ger... lb. .08%® .09 

Doggrass 05%® .06 

Elecampane 08%® .10 

Galangal lb. .04 ® .05 

Gentian lb. .04%® .05 

Ginger, Ja., bled. lb. .16 @ .18 
unbleached ....lb. .11 @ .14 

Ginseng lb. 6.50 ® 7.50 

Golden Seal lb. 2.75 © ... 

Hellebore, pwd...lb. .07 @ .07% 

Helonlas lb. .30 ® .35 

Ipecac, Rio lb. 2.50 © ... 

Carthagena lb. 2.00 ® 2.05 

Jalap lb. .28 ® .30 

Kava Kava @ .50 

Licorice, ord. ...lb. .04 @ .04% 

Select lb. .07%® .12 

Lovage lb. .65 ® .75 

Mandrake lb. .06 @ .07 

Musk, Russian. . .lb. .06 @ .06% 
Orris, Florentine.. lb. .10 ® .11 
Orris, Verona ...lb. .09 © .10 
Pariera Brava ...lb. .38 ® .40 

Pink lb. .30 ® .35 

Bhatany lb. .22 ® .23 

Rhubarb, Canton .. .37%® .40 

Shensl 52%® .60 

high dried 15 © .15% 

clippings 16 ® .30 

Sars'p'la. Hond...lb. .29 ® .31 

Mexican lb. .09 © .09% 

Senega lb. .44 © .46 

Serpentaria lb. .43 ® ... 

Snake, Canada... lb. .20 © .35 

Squill lb. .03%® .04 

Stillingia Ib. .06 ® .07 

Valerian, Belg lb. .07%® .08 

German lb. .12 ® .15 

English lb. .25 ® .30 

Saccharin lb. 1.25 © 1.50 

Sal Ammoniac, lump.lb. .00> 4 r<? .09% 

Granulated lb. .06H® .06% 

Salol lb. .86 © .90 

Saltpetre, crude lb. .04%® .04% 

Beflned lb. .05 ® .07 

Santonin, crystals, .lb. 10.90 ®11.05 



Santonin, powdered. lb. 11.10 ©11.25 
Saw Palmetto Berries, 

lb. ... @ .10 

Seed, Anise, Ital...lb. .07%® .08% 

German lb. .06 ® .06% 

Star lb. .19 @ .19% 

Canary lb. .02%® 03 

Caraway lb. .05%® .05% 

Cardamom, blchd. . .. r >2 @ .85 

Decort.lb. .70 @ .76 

Celery lb. .18 ® .18% 

Cevadilla lb. .11 ® .12 

Colchicum lb. .16 © .17 

Coriander lb. .04%® .08 

Bleached lb. .08 <3 05% 

Cummin lb. .07%® .09 

Fennel, Ger lb. .13 © .14 

Italian ..lb. .08%® .10 

Flax, whole bbl. 10.25 @10.80 

ground lb. .08%® .06 

Fenugreek lb. .02%® .02% 

Il. mp, Russian. ..lb. .03%© .03% 

Larkspur lb. .55 © .60 

Millet, nat lb. .02 <a 02% 

shelled ..lb. .04%® .04% 

Mustard, Cal. yel.lb. ... @ ... 

Cal. brown lb. .06%® .07 

German, yellow. Ib. .04'?® .08% 

' German, brown. Ib. .04%® .05 

Bari, bro^ii ...lb. .07 © .07H 

Sicily, brew n... lb. .07%© ,07t> 

Poppy, blue lb. .07 @ .07% 

Quince, Ger Ib. .60 Cu .7* 

Rape, Ger lb. .04 © .04 '< 

Eng lb. .04%® .04\ 

Stavesacre lb. .13 © .10 

Strophanthus Hispldus, 

lb. .48 @ .50 

Kombe lb. .48 @ .50 

Sunflower lb. .04%® .05 

Wormseed, Amer.lb. .07 @ .07% 

Levant.lb. .13 @ .15 

Seidlitz mixture lb. .14%® .15 

Silver nitrate oz. .35V 4 @ .3H 

Soap, Castile, whlte.lb. .11%® .11% 

green lb. .09%® .10 

mottled lb. .08%® .11 

Sodium bicarb., Eng., 

100 lbs. .02%® .03 

domestic ..100 1b. 1.50 ® 1.70 

benzoate lb. .26 ® .28 

brom., blk lb. .27 ® .28 

carb.. cryst. .100 lb. 1.60 ® 1.75 

citrate lb. ... © .41 

hypophosphite 65 @ .69 

iodide 2.45 @ 2.50 

nitrate lb. .05 ® .08 

phosphate lb. .02%® .02% 

salicylate lb. .32 ® .34 

sulphate 100 lb. .60 © .80 

Sp< rmacotl lb. .30 © ... 

Spts. ether, nit 42 © .44 

Strontium nitrate. . .lb. .07%® .08 

iStrvchnine oz. .60 0i .70 

Sugar of Milk lb. .09%® .10 

.Sugar of Lead lb. .09%© .10 

Sulphur, roll lb. 1.85 © 2.15 

flowers ..lb. 2.20 © 2.60 

flour lb. 2.00 @ 2.40 

Tar, Barbadoes gal. .25 @ .30 

Tartar Emetic lb. .18U© .22 

Thymol 1.40 @ 1.50 

Thymol iodide 2.90 ® 3.00 

Tonka Beans, Para. lb. 1.75 © ... 

Angostura ..lb. 3.75 @ 4.00 

" Surinam ...lb. ... @ ... 

Turmeric 04%© .06 

Turpentine gal. .81 @ ... 

Vanilla Beans lb. 3.25 © 5.00 

Cut, Mex..lb. 2.25 © 2.50 

South Am 3.00 ® 3.76 

Tahiti lb. 1.25 © 1.38 

Bourbon 3.25 © 3.78 

Vanillin oz. .33 © .38 

Venice turpentine. ..lb. .32 © .38 

Artificial 09%© ... 

Wax, Bayberrv lb. .18 ® .20 

Bees, ord lb. .32%© .33 

sel ...lb. .34 © .36 

white lb. .40 © .45 
Brazil, North 

Country, lb. .30 @ .30% 

Brazil, No. 1.1b. .51 © .52 

No. 2.1b. .42 © .44 

No. 3.1b. .30 © .31 

•' Ceresln, yeL.lb. .10 © .18 

whlte.lb. .13 © .20 

Japan lb. ... © .09% 

ParaflJn lb. .04%® .07% 

Zinc Oxide lb. .07 @ .08% 

Spices. 

Cassia. Batavla lb. .17 © .17% 

Batavla, No. 2 12 © .13 

China Cases 09%® .09% 

broken 07%© .07% 

Saigon rolls 42 © .48 

buds 22 © .23 

Chillies. Japan 12%© .12% 

Mombassa 12 © .12% 

Cinnamon, Ceylon 20 © .21 

Cloves, Amboyna 18 © .18% 

Zanzibar 15 © .16 

Ginger, Cochin 11%® .12 

Africa, No. 1 11%® .11% 

Japan 10%® .10% 

Mace, Banda. No. 1.. .65 © .58 

Penang, No. 1 64 © .55 

Penang, No. 2 62 © .63 

Nutmegs, 105s to 110s .11%© .11% 

Paprika, Hungarian .. .18 © .26 

I'epper, Acheen 07%© .07% 

Lampong 07%© .07% 

Singapore 08%® .08% 

white 14%© .14% 

Telllcherry 09 © .09% 

Pimento 04 © .04% 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



63 



Prices Current. 

The outside prices quoted are tor such quantities 
as retailers usually purchase. When purchasing 
original packages the inside quotations should be 
txpected, while a slight advance over the outside 

5 quotations given may be demanded for very small 
ols. Current commercial quality is understood 
unless otherwise indicated For extra quality or 
f»r specified makes a slightly higher price will have 
i* be paid. 

Corrected to January 6. 

Aoatanilid, 6 lbs., .30 lb. .32-34 

Aootone, lb.. .29; medicinal lb. .37 

Aoetphenetidine, lbs., .97 oz. .10 

Aoid, Acetic, D. 8. P., carboy*. .6 lbs. .8-9 

no. 2, carboy, .8; lb., .7; Glacial . lb. .28-30 

Araenous, fused, lb., .18 oz. .8 

Benzoic, English. BO-oz. boxes. 10%.. oz. .13-16 

Benzoic, from Toluol, lbs.. .45 oz. .10-12 

Boric, crystals, 10 lbs., .12 lb. .13-15 

Boric, Po., 25 lbs.. .12 lb. .13-15 

Cacodyllc, %ths oza. 4.00 

Camphoric oz. .26-30 

Carbolic crystals, 10 lbs., .18 lb. .18-20 

Calvert's No. 1, lb., 1.95; No. 2 . lb 1.45 

Solution, 10 gals., .45 gal. .50 

Chromic, lb., .55 ozs. .11 

Chrysopbaulc, 1-oz. cartons ozs. .24-28 

Olnnamlc oz. .28-32 

Citric, crystals, 10 lbs., .45 lb. .48-50 

8«Ulc. lbs., .70 oza. .11-13 

Hydrochloric, carboys, 2% lb. .4-5 

C. P lb. .11-13 

Hydrocyanic, dll.. lbs., .30 ozs. .10 

Hydrobromlc, dll lb. .25 

Hypophosphorus, 50 per cent, sol lb. 1.05 

Lactic, concentr., lb*., .70 ozs. .8-12 

Hltric, carboys, 6% lbs , .8; C. P 14 

Oleic, purified. D. S. P lbs. .35 

Oxalic. 10 lbs., .12 lb. .14 

Phosphoric, glacial lbs. .65 

D. 8. P., 85 per cent, syrupy lb. .37-40 

Picric lb. .56 

Pyrogalllc, lbs., 1.75 ozs. .19-22 

Pyrollgneous, pure lb. .30 

Salicylic, white, 10 lbs., .40 lb. .43-45 

Stearic, hard lb. .25-30 

Bacclnic, pure oz. .45-49 

Sulphuric, carboys, .2 lb. .4 

" C. P., carboys, .10 lb. .12 

Sulphurous lb. .10 

Tannic, lbs.. (D. S. P.. 1.10) lb. .86 

Tartaric, powdered. 10 lbs., .31 lb. .37-3S 

» alerlanlc. inclusive ozs. .25 

Aoonitine, Amorphous, % ozs ea. 1.40 

Acsps Lanae, B. J. D lb. .25 

Agarioin, 15.gr. vials, each. .10 ozs. .75 

Alrol, ozs oz. 1.00 

Albumen, Egg lb. .85-95 

Alcohol, 10 gals., 2.85 gal. 2.90-3.10 

Alcohol, Colombia Spirit, 10 gals., .85.. gal. 1.00 

Cologne Spirit, 10 gals., 3.10 gal. 3.25 

Wood, 10 gals., .60 gal. .65-70 

Aloohol, Denatured, 10 gal gal. .60 

6 gal gal. .65 



Allspice, 10 lbs., .11 lb. .12 

powdered. 6 lbs., .18 lb. .20 

Almonds, bitter, shelled lb. .4S 

Sweet, shelled lb. .41 

Almond Meal, true, 10 lbs., .40 lb. .45 

Aloin, lb., 1.00 oa. .9-11 

Alpha-Eucaine oz. 3.60 

Alphozone os. 4.50 

Alum lb. .4-6 

powdered, bbls., .8 4 lb. .6-8 

burnt, 10 lbs.. .10 lb. .12-14 

Aluminum, Acetate oz. .10-14 

Sulphate lb. .10-20 

Alumnol os. .50 

Amber, rasped os. .35 

Ambergris, gray, oz., $30.00 dram. 4.00 

Ammonia (See Water and Spirit). 

Ammonium, Bromide, 5-lb. bot., .35.... lb. .41 

Carbonate. 26 lbs.. .12 lb. .13-16 

Iodide, lbs.. 8.90 os. .80-35 

Muriate, gran, com., 26 iba., » >i II- .12 

purified, lb., .17; powdered lb. .18 

Salammonlac, muriate, cryst lb. .12-14 

Nitrate, crystals, 10 lbs., .22 lb. .28 

Valerate, lb., 1.78 os. .17-21 

Ammonol os. 1.06 

Amygdalin, %-ot. vials 2.70 

Amyl, Acetate lb. .70 

Amyl, Nitrite os. .20 

Amylene, Hydrate os. .49 

Aniline, Red, crystals lb. 1.26 

Black lb. .76 

Crystals for Ink lb. 1.50 

Blue. Deep, No. 1 lb. 2.00 

Sol., reddish. No. 1 lb. 2.50 

Crimson lb. 1.50 

Brown, Biar.-arck lb. 1.25 

Soluble lb. 1.00 

Green, crystals lb. 1.50 

Orange lb. 1.00 

Purple, B. P lb. 1.75 

Scarlet lb. 1.50 Yellow lb. 1.20 

Annatto lb. .53-58 

Anodyne, Hoffman's (D. S. P., U. 1.00) 

lb. 1.00-1.10 
Anthrax Vaooine, "Pasteur," per double 

tubes of 10 doses 1.78 

Antiaxthrin os. 1.65 

Antidiphtherio Serum, dry (Pasteur), 2,500 

units 1 Gm. tube 2.00 

Antidiphtherio Serum, liquid (Pasteur), 

10 Cc. vial 2.00 

Antikamnia, powdered or tablets oz. 1.00 

and Codeine, "vest-pocket" boxes... doz. 1.76 
(less 5% In 1 gross lota) 

Tablets, "vest-pocket boxes" doz. 1.76 

(less 5% In 1 gross lots) 
Antimony Sulphuret, powd., pure, 10 lbs., 

.12 lb. .14-16 

AntipyTetio Liquid, Tllden's doz. 2.50 

Antipyrine, Dr. Knorr's os. .81 

Antistreptoooio Serum, Lederele, 10 Cc. 

syrup ea. 1.50 

(less 26%) 

New Grade os. .18 

Antistreptoooooio Serum, human (dry), 

"Pasteur" 1 Gm. tube 1.50 



Antistreptoooooio Serum, human (liquid), 

"Pasteur" 10 Cc. vial 1.5* 

Antitetanio Serum, human (dry), "Pas- 
teur" 1 Gm. tube 1.6* 

liquid 10 Cc. vial 1.50 

powder 1 Gm. tube 1.50 

Antithyroids, 10-Cc. vials ea. 1.B0 

Antitoxin. Diphtheria, Lederle's Refined 
and Conoentrated : 

500 units, per package 1.10 

1,000 units, per package 3.0X1 

2,000 units, per package 8.60 

3,000 units, per package 6.00 

4,000 units, per package 6.50 

6,000 unlta, per package 7.60 

7,500 units, per package 10. Of 

10,000 units, per package 13.00 

Less 25 per cent. 
Antitoxin, Diphtheria, Steams' : 

No. 0 per 500 units .66 

No. 1, per 1.000 unlta 1.06 

No. 2. per 2,000 units 1.80 

No. 3. per 3,000 units 2.40 

Ant: venomous, Pasteur, liquid and dry, 

2,500 units 2.00 

Antitoxin Tetanus Lederle: 

1,500 units, per package 2.26 

3,000 units, per package 4.26 

8.000 units, per package 6.60 

Less 25 per cent. 

Apiol, Fluid Green os. .86 

Capsules, Joret's doz. 6.28 

Apomorphine, Uydrochlor, Cryst oz. 11.76 

Amorphous. . .oz. 8.26 

Areca. Nuts, powd lb. .27-32 

Argentamine oz. .76 

Argola, Red, powdered lb. .12 

Anstol, 25 ozs.. 1.65 os. 1.80 

Aristoohin, ozs oz. 2.20 % . .os. 2.26 

Arrowroot, Bermuda, true .»» 

St. Vincent. 30 lbs.. .14 lb. .18 

Taylor's. 14-lb.. 12 lbs.. .28 lb. .82 

Arsenauro. 1-oz. bots doz. 8.50 

Arsenic, Donovan's Sol lb. .20 

Fowler's Sol lb. .10 

White lb. .12 

Atropin, Sulph. li-oz oz .6.00 

Balsam, Copaiba, Para, 5 lbs., .60 lb. .72-77 

Fir. Canada lb. .85-90 

Oregon lb. .25-80 

Peru lb. 2.20-2.25 

Tolu, 10-lb. can, .29 lb. .80-M 

Barbadoes Tar gal. .96 

Barium, Acetate os. .14 

Carbonate lb. .28-30 

Chloride lb. .25-27 

Nitrate lb. .17 

Barium Peroxide oz. .4-7 

Bark, Angostura lb. .45 

Barbery lb. .28 

Berberls Aqulfol lb. .40 

Buckthorn lb. .13 

Canella lb. .20 

Caseaia, Sagrada lb. .17-22 

Cascarilla, select lb. .26 

Cassia, In mats lb. .14 

Saigon ..- lb. .7* 



THE. MARVEL 

"WHIRLING SPRAY" SYRINGE 




IT IS 



MARVEL 



WAS AWARDED THE GOLD MEDAL. DIPLOMA 
AND CERTIFICATE OF APPRODATION BY THE 
SOCIETE D'HYGIENE OF FRANCE, OCTOBER 
9th, 1902 

as the latest and best improvement in Vaginal 
Syringes. Particular attention is called to 
the fact that by reason of its peculiar con- 
struction tbe Marvel Syringe dilates and 
flushes the vagina with a volume of whirling 
spray which smooths out the folds and per- 
mits the injection to come Into contact with 
the entire surface, fnstantly dissolving and 
washing out all secretions and discharges. 





FULLY PROTECTED BY PATENTS 
ALL JOBBERS SELL IT 



THE MARVEL CO. 

Sole Proprietors 
44 East 23rd Street - New York 

BRANCH OFFICES : 
Paris, France ... 42 Rue du Marche 
London. England 11 Queen Victoria Street 
Sydney, N.S.W.. Australia. 416 418 George St. 
Montreal. Can. - Nat. Drug & Chem. Co. 



64 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Cinchona, R<>(1, K. I In. S« 

powdered. 10 lbs.. .32 lb. .32-35 

ClDcbong Callsaya lb. .3« 

powdered lb. .40 

pale, lb.. .20: powdered lb. .28 

Cinnamon, Ceylon lb. .86 

Coodartoico lb. 20 

Elm, selected lb. .25-2S 

croand. 10 Iba.. .18 lb. .20 

powdered. 10 Iba., .-22 lb. 25 

Hemlock, ernahed lb. .15 

Mexereon lb. 25 

Oat white ernahed lb. .IB 

Orange reel, bitter Ib. 18 

Prickly Ash Ib. .80 

Quebracho lb. .25 

Sassafras, 10 lbs., .25 lb. .27 

Sassafras. Extra lb. .22-25 

SImaraba lb. .SO 80 

Soap (Quillaje), cnt, 6 lb«.. .14 lb. .15 

powdered lb. .20 

Wild Cherry, 5 lb»., .12 lb. .14 

ground. 5 lba., .14 lb. .18 

Wltcb Haxel lb. .20 

Barley, Pearl lh. .5-8 

Bay Hum, Porto Rico gal. 1.90-2.30 

St. Thomas gal. 2.70-3.20 

Bean, Calabar lb. .40 

8t. Ignatius lb. .80 

Tonka, Angostura lb. 4.25 

Surinam lb. 1.50-1.75 

Vanilla, Mexican, long Ib. 6.50 

mcd lb. 6.00 

•hort Ib. 5.50 

Bourbon, long lb. 4.00 

med lb. 3.75 

short lb. S 50 

Benzol, Coal Tar lb. .24 

Benzonaphtbol lbs. 1.80-2.00 

oca. .19 

Berbenno, Carb oz. 5.00 

Hydr.>chlor ox. 1.90 

Berries, Cubeb. lb., .65; powdered lb. .68-73 

fish lb. .10 

Juniper lb. .8-8 

powdered lb. .15-18 

Poke lb. .20 

Pricklv Ash lb. .50 

Sumac lb. .20 

Beta-Euoaine ox. 8.50 

Bismuth, Ammonia Citrate, lb., 2.85.. ox. .23 

Subca rbonate, 5 lbs., 2.25 lb. 2.35 

Subnitrate, 5 lbs., 1.80 lb. 1.90 

Subgallate, 5 lbs., 1.80 lb. 1.90 

Subsalicylate, lb., 2.40 ox. .22-25 

Blaoklegine, "Pastenr" (Blackleg Vaccine, 

cord form). No. 1. 10 dosea 1.50 

Blaoklegine, "Pastenr'' (Blackleg Vaccine, 

cord form). No. 2, 20 dosea 2.50 

Blaoklegine, "Pastenr" (Blackleg Vaccine. 

cord form). No. 3, 50 doses 6.00 

Blackleg Vaooine, "Pastenr," powder 

packet, single. 10 to 12 doses 1.50 

donble. 10 to 20 doses 2.0C 



Blacklegules, pellet form, same prices as 

Blackieglne. 

Bladder W-*ok Ib. 26 

Blue Vitriol, hbl.. .4%; 100 lba., .6% lb. .7-10 

powdered V) lbs , .13 Ib. .16 

Bole Armenia, powdered, tnie lb. .12 

Bone Ash lb. 10 12 

Borax. 100 lbs.. 5 lb. .8-10 

powdered 50 ha.. .6 lb. .8-10 

Breaot Tea 5 Ilia.. .25 lb. .27-30 

Brimstone Roll, bbls., .2Vt lb. .4-5 

Bromine oz. .19 

Bromoform oz. 17 

Buds, Balm of Gllead Ib. .46 

Cassia lb. .33 

Butter, Cacao, 12 lbs., .45 lb. .53-58 

Butylohloral ox. .85 

Caffeine, Ib.. 4.25 os. .29-31 

Bromide ox. .40 

Citrated, O. S. P., lb., 2.70 oz. .25-27 

Valerianate oz. .45 

Calamine lb. .15-18 

Caloium, carb., precip lb. .8-10 

Glycerophosphate os. .18-22 

tablets, boxes, 50 5-gr ea. .30 

Hypophoapblte. lb.. .80 ox. .10-14 

Iodide os. .35 

Lartophosphate ox. .13-15 

Phosphate, precip lb. .17-19 

Sulphide lb. .28 

Calomel. 1C lbs., .91 lb. .93-98 

Camphor, Monobromated, lb., 1.55 ox. .17-21 

Can than dal Vesicant, oza dox. 2.50 

Cantharidin grain .12 

Cantharides Russian lb. 83-93 

powdered lb. .93-1.03 

Capsicum, African lb. .18-20 

powdered 5 lbs., .22 lb. .26-27 

Caroid, powder form ox. 1.26 

and Soda Tablets. 150s bot. .67 

Carbon Disulphide lb. .18 

Carmine, No. 40. lb.. 4.25-4.50 oz. .30-35 

Castor, Fiber, oz., 1.60; powdered oz. 1.75 

Cerium. Oxalate, lb., .45 oz. .7 

Chalk, French, powdered lb. .6-8 

precip.. Thomas' Eng.. 7-lb. bag lb. 9 

prepared. Thomas' Eng., 8-lb., white, box .50 

prepared. Thomas' Eng., 8-lb., pink, box .65 

prepared lb. .7 

Charooal, Animal, powd lb. .10 

Willow, powd lb. .14-16 

Chloral Hydrate. 10 lbs.. 1.10 lb. 1.20-1.40 

Croton oz. 35 

Chloralamid. 25 pkga., .70 pkg. .80 

Chloroform, Purified. 5 lbs.. .32 lb. .36-38 

Chooolate, Esseoce of (Bunkel), 6 lb. tin.. .40 

25 lb. tins and 50 lb. drums 37 

bbls. and V» bbls 36 

Cinchonidine, Salicylate oz. .45 

Sulphate, 6 os. cans, .20 os. .25 

Cinohonine, Sulphate oz. .13-17 

Civet oz. 2.60 

Clay. China, lb.. .8; powdered lb. .in 



Cloves, 10 lbs., .23 lb. .27-30 

powdered, 5 lbs., .24 lb. 28 

Cobalt, Carbonate oz. .36 

Chloride oz. 27 

N'itrate. oz., 25; powdered os. .26 

Cooaine, Hydrochloride, Cryst oz. 3.66-3.90 

Alkaloid ox. 4.65-4.80 

Oleate, 5 per cent oz. 1.00 1 15 

Cochineal, Honduras lb. 58 

powdered lb. 60 

Codeine, Pure Alkaloid, ozs ox. 3.80-3.88 

Sulphate, ozs oz. 4.15-4.40 

Colohioine, cryst., 15-gr. vials grain 14 

Collodion lb. <8 58 

Cantharldal 1h. 1 75 

Flexible lb. 53-60 

Colocynth Apple lh SO 

powdered lb .68 

Composition Powder. 2 ozs lb. 38 

Copper. Sulph., bbl., .4% lb. .7-10 

Iodide oz. 40 

Copperas, bbl., .1 lb. .2-3 

Corrosive Sublimate, 10 lbs., .81 lb. 86-8* 

powdered, 10 lbs., .84 lh. 89-94 

Coumarin, Cryst.. Fries Bros., lb., 7.00.oz. .78 

Cowhage oz. -50 

Cream Tartar, 99 p. c, powdered, 26 lbs., 

.30; 10 lbs., .31 lb. .32-34 

Creolin, >4 lbs., dox., 4.00; lbs doz. 8.08 

Creosol, U. S. P lb. .20-23 

Creosote, Beech wood Tar lb. .90-2.60 

Carbonate, lbs., 9.00 oz. .86 

Phosphite, lb.. 10.00 oz. 1 00 

Cystogen, powdered, ozs ox. 1.00 

powdered, 8 os pkg. 4.00 

5-gr. tablets, ozs oz. 1 10 

8 oz pkg. 5 00 

28's doz. 4 00 

Aperient doz. 8.00 

Cumarine, lb., 4.50 ox. .38 

Cuttle-Fish Bone, select lb. .30-60 

Dermatol, oz.. .22 lb. 2.50 

Dextrin, bag, .6% lb. .8-10 

Diabetin lb. 1.30 

Digalen, oz. vial ea. .80 

Digitalin, % ozs ox. 7 50 

Diuretin lb. 1.78 

Dover's Powder lh. I 70 

Dragon's Blood, reeds lb. .70 

extra powdered Ib. .90-1 08 

Earth, Fullers, po., 26 lbs.. .5 lb. .8-8 

Eka-Iodoform oz. .70 

Elaterium os. 1.10 

Emulsol. per doz., 2 oz 8 08 

Elixir Iodo- Bromide of Caloium Comp,, 

Tllden's pt 82 

EmpyToform oz. 66 

Eosote (Creosote Valerianate) os. 1 IS 

Epicarin ox. 50 

Epsom Salts, bbl., .1% lb. IS 

Ergotine, Bonjeans, lb., 4.50 .ox 30 

Ergot. Spanish lb. 1.20-1.25 

powdered lb. 1.26-1.81 

Russian, lbs., .80; powdered lb. 1.20-1.25 



If you desire to know anything 
about 

PURE TIN TUBES 

Address 

NEW ENGLAND COLIAPSIBLE TUBE CO. 

NEW LONDON. CT., U. S. A. 



ALL SIZES I ^^Ts'ed I MY QUANTITY 



Olive Oil 
At a F» roiit ! 

SULTANA OLIVE OIL! 

Goes, and Goes Quickly, and Every one Comes 
for More; because it is Absolutely Pure, is pressed 
from the Oldest Olive Trees in Grecian archipel- 
ego, and is sold at the Lowest Price Possible. 

You can obtain it in tins, glass, or jugs of all 
sizes, from your jobber, or from 

J. E. ATBANASSIADES' SONS 

71-77 Park Place, IM. v. 

Factories and Mills : ISLAND OF LESBOS 
Write for our interesting booklet 




KELENE 

Pure Chloride of Ethyl 

FOR LOCAL AND GENERAL 

ANAESTHESIA 

Manufacturers : 

FRIES BROS. 

92 Reade Street :: NEW YORK 

Sole Distributors for the United States : 

MERCK & CO. 

New York Railway, N. J. St. Louis 

Literature sent upon request 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



I 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



65 



Esc-nne grain .18 

Sulphate, B-gr. ▼ grain .10 

Salicylate. 6-gr. t grain .10 

Ether, Nltroaa, Cone, %, and 1 lba. . . .70-90 

Sulphuric lb. .25-30 

Acetic lb. .40 

Ethiopa Mineral lb. .70 

Ethyl, Bromide, l-oi. bot. or tube 01. 20-32 

Iodide 01. .54 

Eucaine, Hydrocblor, %, % ot., 8.60; 

Mi. 1 01. 3.50 

Eureiol ox. 1.00 

Ex odin, 7ttgr. tablets, 10 In box box .80 

oxs. 1.40 

Extraot. Logwood, bulk, 24-lb. box, .10%; 

lb.. .12; % lbs., -IB; Mi lb*., 18; 1 lb. .12-15 

Syei tones doz. 3S-42 

ferratin, pow. or tablets, 26 ozs., .75.oz. .85 

Farripyrine oz. 1.35-1.50 

Ferro-Scmatoie, lbs. and % lba lb. 6.50 

% lba lb. 6.75 

2-ox. tlna doz. 10.50 

Flrvrein, TUden's pt. .86 

Fli-stick-on, the fly ribbon, >4 gross carton 1.20 

Flowera, Arnica lb. .18-18 

Blue, Centaury lb. .50 

Calendula lb. .43-53 

Chamomile. Roman lb. .32-37 

German, 1008 lb. .30-35 

Elder lb. 40 

Kooao, lba., .50; powdered lb. 

La render lb. .30-40 

Malva, Black, lb., .40; Blue lb. .50 

Mullel lb. .85-1.00 

Orange lb. 1.50 

Boae, Bed, French lb. .86-1.00 

Rosemary lb. .28 

Saffron. Valencia, lbs., 11.00-12.50. .oz. .90-1.00 

Saffron. Amer lb. .40-60 

Formaldehyde, carboys, .10% 15-25 

Fonnin, lbs., 1.00 ox. .14 

Tableta, 5 grs., 80 In tube ea. .20 

6 gra., 100 In tube ea. .50 

7Mi grs., 20 In tube ea. .20 

7% gra., 70 In bot ea. .50 

Formol, lb., .55; 5-lb. bota lb. .50 

Oalega-Vera doz. 10.60 

Qaletone doz. 10.60 

dambier, mats, .8M> lb. .10-12 

GhU'lio String .25 

Gelatin, Cooper's lb. .60 

French, White lb. .50-1.00 

Geosot, Gualacol Valerianate ox. 2.60 

Glass Wool, for Altering acids ox. 1.25 

Glucose lb. .8-12 

Glutol ox. .66 

Glycerin, C. P., 30°, can, 50 lbs., .30.. lb. .31-34 

Goat's Rue Fluid Extraot lb. 1.75 

" % lb. 1.86 

" H lb. 2 00 

Gold Chloride, 10-gr. bot doz. 6.10 

and Sodium doz. 2.70 

Goose Grease lb. .46-50 

Green, Paris (See Paris). 



Grape Juioe. Welch's, nts.. 1 doz.... ease 4.50 

" " pta., 2 doz.... case 4.75 

" gal., 2-3 doz... case 5.25 

" Nabotb, qts., 1 doz.... case 4.50 

" pts.. 2 doz....cas». 4.75 

" " gals., 1-3 doz. case 5.00 

Guiaicol, lb.. 2.40 oz. .22 

Carbonate, ox., .22; Salicylate ox. 1.60 

Guaiaoophoaphal oz. 1.50 

Guarana, powdered lb. 2.75-2.85 

Gum, Aloes, Barbados, True lb. .8.", 

" powdered lb. 1.00 

Cape lb. 16-20 

powdered lb. .25-27 

Curacao lb. .12 

" gourds. .13-15 

Socotrlne, lb., .85; powdered. .. .lb. .45 

Ammoniac lb. .30 

Arabic, lst's, lb., .46; powdered. .. .lb. .55 

2d's, lb., .38; powdered lb. .48 

3d's, lb., .32; 4th's lb. .25 

sifted sorts, lb., .21; sorts lb. .17 

Asafetida, lb., 2.15; powdered lb. 2.60-2.70 

Benzoin lb. .50-55 

Camphor, 100 lbs., .4314 lb. .47-52 

Catechu, powdered lb. .22-28 

Chicle, bag, .66 lb. .60-65 

Damar lb. .30 

Galhanum, strained lb. 1.00-1.16 

Gamboge, lb.. .85; powdered lb. 90-1.00 

Gualac lb. .35 powdered lb. .45 

Kino lb. .40 powdered. .. .lb. .50 

Myrrh lb. .85 powdered .... lb. .46 

Extra Select lb. .45-50 

Ollbanum. garblinga lb. .12-20 

Olibanum. tears lb. .20-23 

Opium, lbs., 6.20; powdered lb. 7.40-8.15 

Sandarac lb. .20-25 

Shellac, D. O lb. .40-45 

Bngllab lb. .86-40 

Garnet lb. .36 

Spruce, true lb. 1.75-2.00 

Thus lb. .11-15 

Tragacanth, Aleppo, No. 1 lb. .80 

" " " powdered, .lb. 1.00 

No. 2 lb. .80 

" " " powdered, .lb. .90 

Turkey, sorts lb. .30 

Gun Cotton ox. .35 

Gutta Peroha, Chips lb. 2.75 

Hedonal ox. 1.60 

Hemioranine ox. .90 

Hemogallol oz. .80 

Herb, Agrlmon.-, German, lb., .20 oz. .26 

Arnica Flowers, ozs lb. 30 

Althea " lb. .66 

Balm, lemon, oxa., .40; sweet, ozs.... lb. .35 

Balmony, Leaves, oxa lb. .28 

Bittersweet, Twigs, oza lb. .30 

Bittersweet lb. .10 

Blackhaw, Bark of Root, ozs lb. 40 

Bladder Wrack, oxa lb. .30 

Blessed Thistle Leaves, oza lb. .35 

Boneset, oxs lb. .28 



Boneset, Herb, ozs lb 26 

Broom Top, Scotch, ozs lb 30 

Buckthorn, Bark, ozs lb. 28 

Bugle, Bitter. Herb. <v/* 

Burdock lb. 3» 

Canabls. Indira, oza lb 1 96 

Catnip, ozs lb 28 

Centaury, American Herb, ozs lb 30 

Centaury, Minor, ozs lb 20 

Chamomile Flowera, German, oxs.... lb. 40 

" " Roman, oza. . lb. 40 

Chlretta lb 34 

Clover Heads, red, ozs lb 40 

Cramp Bark, oxs. ozs 24 

Cranesbtll Root, oxs lb 21 

Damlana Leaves, ozs lb. M 

Dandelion Root, true, ozs lb. 28 

Dog Grass, ozs lb. .26 

Elder Blows, ozs Ib. .27 

Feverfew, ozs lb. 46 

Fleabane Herb, Canada, ozs lh. .34 

Galega or Goat's Rue lb. .48 

Gold Thread Herbs, oza lb. 1.20 

Gravel Plant Herb, ozs Ib. 28 

Grlndella Robusta, ozs lb. .28 

" Squarrosa, ozs lh. 40 

Hops. 1910 crop, ozs lb. .60 

Horehound, oxs lb. .24 

Horsemint Herb, oxs lb. .36 

Hyssop Herb, oxs lb. .30 

Ivy, American, bark or root, ozs lb. 25 

Herb, ground lb. .26 

Jamaica Dogwood Bark lb. .80 

Johnswort Herb lb. .30 

Lady Slipper Root lb. .60 

Life Everlasting, ozs lb. .28 

Llndin Flowers, with leaves, ozs ...lb .40 

Liverwort, German, ozs lb 30 

Leaves, German, ozs lb 80 

Lobelia, ozs lh. .28 

Maiden Hair, ozs lb. .28 

Marjoram, Sweet, ozs Ib. .36 

Mallow, ozs., lb., .34; wild, ozs lb. 20 

Motherwort, oz« lb. .34 

Mullein, German lb. 22 

Pansy Herb lb. 30 

Paraguay Tea, genuine lb. .40 

Pennroyal, ozs., lb., 20: Leaf. ozs. lh 23 

Peppermint, oxs. lb. . .27 

German, bulk, lh . 76; Herb, ozs Ib 24 

Plantain Leaves, R»-n\ "is. lb. 30 

Poppy Leaves, Red, ozs Ib. .66 

Prince's Pine Leaf, ozs lb. 80 

Pulsatilla, oza Ih. .40 

Raspberry Leaf, ozs lb. 30 

Rue, ozs Ih. 34 

Saffron, American, oxs Ib. 1.60 

Sage, lbs., lb.. .15; oxs Ib. .18 

Domestic, ozs lh. .36 

Savin Leaves, ozs Ib. .28 

Southernwort Herb, ozs .48 

Spearmint, ozs lh. .30 

Tansy, oza lb. .26 

Thyme, ozs lb. .26 



THE 



pastometrr 

SOLVES THE PROBLEM OF THE 
HOME PASTEURIZATION OF MILK 



The necessity of rendering all milk 
free from harmful bacteria is gen- 
erally recognized by the medical pro- 
fession. Pasteurization is advocated 
by physicians, milk committees, and 
health boards as the most effective 
means of reducing infant mortality 
and preventing the epidemics which 
follow the use of infected milk. 

The Pastometer is a simple, inex- 
pensive device which permits the 
housewife to pasteurize all the milk 
used in the home with the maximum 
of accuracy and the minimum of in- 
convenience. 

The Pastometer is being vigorous- 
ly introduced to the medical profes- 
sion, and the druggist should be able 
to fill the demand of his clientele 

Order through your jobber. 

THE THERMOTON COMPANY, 

6 Clilf Street. New York. 



Common Sense 
Rat and Roach 
Exterminators 



25c SIZE, $2.00 PER DOZEN DELIVERED 



It s a Good Seller Because It Does the Work 



COMMON SENSE MFG. CO., BUFFALO, N. Y. 



SAL HEPATICA 

The Original Effervescing Saline 
Laxative. Uric Acid Solvent. 

A combination of the Tonic, Alterative and 
Laxative Salts similar to the celebrated Bitter 
Waters of Europe, fortified by the addition of 
Lithia and Sodium Phosphate. It stimulates 
the liver, tones intestinal glands, .purifies the 
alimentary tract, improves digestion, assimila- 
tion and metabolism. 

Especially valuable in 

Rheumatism, Gout, Bilious Attacks and Constipation 

Most efficient in eliminating toxic products 
from intestinal tract or blood, and correcting 
vicious or impaired functions. 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLE 

BRISTOL-MYERS CO. 

Manufacturing .Chemists 

277-279 Greene Avenue, 




Brooklyn - New York 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



66 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Vervain, ozs lb. .24 

Viola tricolor, oz» lb. .36 

Wormwood, ozs., lb., .30; powdered .. lb. .35 

Yerba Santa lb. .27 

Heroin, 15-gr. rials, ea., .29 oz. 6.70 

Honey lb. .14-16 

Hops, fresh, 1910, bulk, .40 lb. .45-50 

pressed, Vi and lbs lb. .45-50 

pressed, ozs lb. .55 

Homatropine, bydrobrom, 5. 10 and 15 

gr. vials grain .21-23 

Hydrastine, Alkaloid oz. 10.00 

Hydrooyanate of Iron, Tilden's oz. .80 

Hydrogen Dioxide lb. .20-40 

Hydroquinone oz. .15 

Hyosoyamine, Alkaloid, 5, 10, IS gr. vials, 

grain .32-40 

Hjdiobromate, 5, 10, 15 gr. v grain .20-30 

Sulphate, pure Amorph., 5, 10, 15 gr. 

vials grain .20-25 

Iatrol oz. .95 

Iohthyol, lb., 4.00 oz. .32 

Indigo, Madras lb. .75 

Manila lb. .75 

Sulphate comp., 9-lb. bot lb. .45 

Paste lb. .20 

Insect Powder, pure, bbls., .60; 50 lbs., 

50%; 25 lbs., .51 lb. .55-60 

W. & B., bbls.. .35; kegs, 50 lbs., .85% 

drums, 25 lbs., .38 lb. 

Iodine, lbs., 3.00 oz. .27-34 

Iodoform, ib., 3.60 oz. .29-33 

lodothyrine, ozs., 3.40; %-oz., 3.65; *4-oz. 8.90 

Iron, by Hydrogen, gray, C. S. P lb. .55 

Benzoate oz. .22 

Cacodylate oz. 1.40 

Carbonate, preclp.. lb., .18; sacch lb. .28 

Vallet's lb. .30 

Chloride lb. .35 

Sol.. D S. P lb. .14 

Tlnct., D. S. P lb. .35 

Citrate, C. S. P lb. .64 

and Ammonium lb. .61 

and Quinine, lbs., 1.80 oz. .18-22 

Dlalyzed, Solution lb. .35 

Glycerophosphate oz. .22-26 

tablets, boxes, 50 5-gr ea. .40 

Iodide, oz., .33; syrup of lb. .31-36 

Lactate oz. .7 

Pernitrate, Solution lb. .25 

Pyrophosphate, Soluble lb. .61 

Phosphate, scales, U. S. P lb. .61 

Snbsulphate (Mongol's) lb. .23 

Solution (Monsel's) lb. .15 

Sulphate, pure lb. .12 

exsiccated lb. .18 

and Potash Tartrate lb. .48 

Isinglass, American lb. .90 

Russian, true. Beluga lb. 3.76 

Jeoorin Tablets, 12's doz. 4.00 

Jewelers' Rouge lb. .76 

Juioe, Dandelion, Bug lb. 1.75 

Juniper, Germ lb. .25-30 



Kamala, purified, powdered lb. 1.60 

No. 2, powdered lb. .65 

Kaolin lb. .08 

Kelene, automatic, 1.10 60-1.00 

Kermes Mineral lb. 1.10 

Kola Nut, lb., .25; powdered lb. .35 

Kresamin ox. 1.00 

Lactophenin, powd. or tab., 25 ozs., .90. oz. 1.00 

Lacto-Somatose, 2-oz. tins doz. 10.50 

hi-lba lb. 6.75 

V4-lbs lb. 6.50 

Lactucarium, German oz. .75 

Laminoids doz. 8.00 

Lanikol, 1-oz. Jars, doz., 3.50; 4-oz., doz., 

9.50 lb. 2.60 

Lanolin, Liebrich (Wool Fat), 10 lbs., .70, 

lb. .75 

Lanolin Puriss. B. J. D lb. .30 

Lead, Acetate, White lb. .12-14 

Carbonate lb. .12 

Iodide lb. .28 

Red lb. .10 

Subacetate, Sol lb. .16 

Leaf, Aconite lb. .20 

Eng., 1-lb. cans only lb. 1.10 

Arbor Vltae lb. .20 

Bay lb. .12 

Belladonna lb. .30 

Eng., 1-lb. cans only lb. 1.20 

Blackberry lb. .20 

Blessed Thistle, ozs lb. .27 

Borage, ozs lb. .38 

Butternut lb. 15 

Buchu, long, lb., .95; short lb. 1.30 

Castor Oil lb. .30 

Cherry Laurel lb. .40 

Chestnut lb. .23 

Coca, Huanuco, lb., .40; Truxlllo lb. .32 

Coltsfoot, ozs Ib. .25 

Conlum, lb lb. .18 

Damiana lb. .52 

Digitalis lb. .21 

Eng., 1-lb. cans only lb. .86 

Eucalyptus lb. .15 

Fern, sweet, ozs lb. .22 

Foxglove, ozs lb. .60 

Hyoscyamus Ib. .26 

Am., 1-lb. cans only ...lb. 1 

Eng., Biennial, 1-lb. bots. only lb. 3.00 

German, bulk lb. .26 

Jaborandl, true lb. .23 

Laurel, trne lb. .15 

Matlco lb. .35 

Patchouli lb. .50 

Raspberry, ozs lb. .25 

Senna, Alexandria lb. .20-30 

Tinnivelly lb. .16-26 

India lb. .16 

Stramonium lb. .16-21 

Strawberry leaves lb. .28 

Dva Ursa lb. .12 

Witch Hazel lb. .15 

Leeohes, Swedish, per 100, 4.00 doz. .60 



Liquorioe, P. 8 lb. .28 

Corigliano lb. .30-32 

Y. A S., 5-lb. boxes lb. .28 

Lime, Chlorinated, balk, bbls., .8 lb. .8 

1-lb. tins lb. .8-8 

Litharge Ib. .10-12 

Lithium, Bromide oz. .28 

Carbonate lb. 1.00 

Citrate lb. 1.43 

Glycerlno-Phosph ozs. .78 

Iodide oz. .48 

Salicylate oz. .IT 

Litmus lb. .40 

Lunar Caustio, pure, 6.50 oz. .42-46 

In cones oz. .65-60 

Lupulin, American lb. .65 

German lb. .90 

Lycopodium, Politz, 10 lbs., .50 lb. .55-60 

Lysol lb. .67 

Mace lb. .68 

Magnesia, Calcined lb. .56-60 

heavy lb. .66-75 

Magnesium, carbonate, M lbs. lb. .18-26 

2 oz lb .20-38 

S. S lb. .55-70 

Citrate, gran lb. .50-76 

Sulph. (Epsom Salts), bbls.. .01% lb. .2-4 

Maltopepsine, Tilden's pt. .62 

Manganauro, 1-oz. bots doz. 8.50 

Manganese, Black Oxide lb. .5-13 

Hypopbosphlte, oz., .20; sulphate . .oz .5 

Manna, large flake lb. 1.00-1.05 

small flake, 5 lbs., .60 lb. .68-73 

Mannite lb. 3.28 

Marble Dust bbl. 1.80 

Menthol, lbs., 3.45 oz. .32-36 

Mercauro, 1-oz., bots doz. 8.50 

Mercury, 5 lbs., .80 lb. .85-90 

Colloidal oz. w> 

Ammon lb. 115 

Bisulpnate lb. .75 

Chloride, Corrosive, 10 lbs., .78 lb. .83-88 

Chloride, powdered, 10 lbs., .81 lb. .86-91 

Calomel. 10 IbB., .88 lb. .93-98 

with Chalk lb. .48-60 

Iodide, Proto., lbs., 2.75 ozs. .21-24 

Blniodide, lbs., 2.00 oz~ .26 

Oxide, Red lbs. 1.18-1 HI 

Pill (Blue Mass) lbs. .48 

powdered lbs. .00 

Herring's English lbs. 1.28 

Red Precipitate lb. 1.18-1.31 

White Precipitate lb. 1.36 

powdered lb. 1.41 

Methyl, Acetate oz .48 

Bichloride oz. .68 

Iodide lb. 1.00 

Oxide oz. .50 

Salicylate lb. 45 56 

Methylene, Bichloride oz .65 

Milk Sugar, powdered, 10 lbs., .15 lb. .17-19 

Morphine, Acetate oz. 3.8C 

Muriate, %s oz. 3.80 



The finest American- made Gelatine 

ost Oo&jrd 

Made to Order. Platino, Sepia-brown, Hand-colored. 
THE ALBERTYPE CO. Brooklyn* N. Y. 



PATENTS secured to prolecl inventions 



ROYAL E. BURNHAM 


Send for free Book- 


Patent Attorney 


lets on Patents and 


876 Bond Bldg.. Washington, D.C. 


Trad'vMarks 



TRADE-MARKS pe9ls,er patent omce s,a,cs 



The best dental cleanser in 
the world for you and 
your children 

DR. SHEFFIELD'S 
CREME DENTIFRICE 




- EUREKA <• 

Prescription Filing Cabinet 



WRITE FOR INFORMATION. 



E. B. READ & SON CO., 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



DRUG LABELS — BOXCS — PRINTED - LITHOGRAPH ED 



| MACHINE CUT CORKS 



JUSTUS BRAUER & SON 

129 ARCH STREET 



Established 1865 



PHILADELPHIA 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



67 



Sulphate, %s, P. & W., ozs oz. 3.10 

2 Hi oz. cartons (26 ozs., 3.4S) oz. 3.5B 

Mom, Iceland, lb.. .12; Irish lb. .18-22 

Muak, Tonqatn. Pods oz. 14.00-20.00 

grain oz. 22.00-24.00 

Kailitxa doa. 2.00 

Naphtha. Wood lb. .24 

Wood, 06 p. c, bbla.. .75 gal. .80-90 

Naphthaline, balls, SO lbs., .4 lb. .4-6 

cakes and squares lb. .6-8 

Maphthol oz. .18 

Haroeine o». 6.50 

Nephritioa, Tllden's pt. .82 

Nickel, Bromide 01. .30 

Carbonate oz. .25 

Chloride oz. .26 

Metallic 01. .25 

Nitrate oz. .18 

Oxide, pare oz. .75 

Sulphate oz. .10 

Sirvanin oz. 3.50 

tfitroglyoerin, 1 per cent, solution, lbs., 

1.10 oz. .12 

Mutrolactis doz. 10.00 

Nutgalla. lb., .30: powdered lb. .40 

Nutmegs lb. .30-36 

Nutrose. ^4 lbs.. 4.00; % lbs.. 3.75 lb. 3.35 

Nux Vomica lb. .9-12 

Powdered, pure lb. .18-22 

Oakum, hales 50 lbs.. .08 lb. 12 

Oatmeal lb. .6-8 

Oil, Almond. Bitter, lbs.. 6.50 oz. .55 

Sweet, True, 5 lbs., .60 lb. .65-70 

Amber, crude lb. .25 

reel lb. .40 

Anise lb. 1.80-1.00 

Bay, American, bot. 22 ozs.. 3.75 oz. .35 

West Indies, bot. 23 ozs., 8.60 ... oz. .50 

Benne gal. 1.00 

Bergamot, 5-lb. cans lb. 4.70-4.95 

Sanderson's lb. 4.95 

Black Pepper lb. .76 

Cade lb. .35 

Cajuput lb. .70-83 

Capsicum oz. .50 

Caraway lb. 1.75 

Cassia lb. 1.40 

Castor. 40-lb. can lb. .HH-12% 

Cedar Leaves, Amer lb. .85-95 

Chaulmoogra lb. 2.00 

Cinnamon, Ceylon, lb., 15.00 oz. 1.10 

Cltronella lb. .38-48 

Clove, 5 lbs., 1.00 lb. 1.10-1.20 

Coeoanut, Refined, 10 lbs., .20 lb. .24 

Codllver, N. F., kegs, 30 gals., 25.00, 

each gal. 1.10 

Norwegian, bbls.. 30 gals., 34.00 to 

36.00 gal. 1.40-1.50 

Copaiba lb. 1.40 

Cottonseed gal. .90-95 

Croton lb. 1.20 

Croton, Eng lb. 1.75 

Cubeb, Amer lb. 4.35-4.60 



Cumin, lb., 4.60 oz. .35 

Cypress (Scblmmel & Co.), lb., 9.00.. oz. .70 

Erlgeron lb. 1.80 

Eucalpytuz, Australian lb. .90 

Fennel lb. 1.75 

Geranium, Turkish lb. 5.10 

French, lb., 8.00; Prepared. lb. 16.00 
Juniper Berries lb. 1 50 

Wood lb. .no 

Lard, No. 1 gal. 1.46 

Lavender Flowers lb. 2.75 

Chlris In. 2.75 

Garden lb. 1.18 

Haarlem (Sylvester's Genuine) doz. 3.00 

Lemon lb. 1.20 

1-lb. copper cans lb. 1.25 

Sanderson's lb. 1.26 

Lemongrass lb. 1.90 

Linseed. Boiled, by bbl., .97 gal. 1.08-1.13 

Linseed, Raw, by bbl., .96 gal. 1.05-1.11 

Lubricating, gal., .20; Refined gal. .12 

Mustard, Expressed gal. .76 

Mustard, Essential, lb., 8.00 oz. .65-75 

Neatsfoot gal. .90 

Neroli, Blgarade oz. 5.00 

CblrlB oz. 5.26 

Petale oz. 6.50-5.75 

Olive, Malaga gal. 1.60-1.75 

Fine Salad, 3-gal. cans, 2.75 gal. 3.35 

Orauge, Bitter lb. 2.85 

Sweet lb. 3.20 

1-lb. copper cans 2.95 

Origanum, pure lb. .85-1.60 

Palm lb. .20 

Patchouli, lb., 7.60 oz. .66 

Pennyroyal, 6 lbs.. 2.00 lb. 2.10 

Peppermint lb. 2.50-2.75 

Hotchklss lb. 2.75-3.00 

Redistilled lb. 2.75-3.00 

Petroleum, crude gal. .25 

Pimento, lb.. 2.60 oz. .26 

Plnus, Pumlllo ozs. .39-43 

Sylvestris lbs. 1.00-2.00 

Rhodium, true, lb., 16.00 oz. 1.25 

Rose, Kazanlik oz. 8.25 

Orozoff oz. 8.50 

Rosemary, Eperle lb. 1.50 

Trieste lb. .85 

Rue, lb., 5.60 oz. .40 

Salad Union gal. .90-95 

Sandalwood. W. I., lb., 2.75; Engl.. lb. 4.75 

Sassafras lb. .93 

Savin lb. 2.00 

Spearmint, lb., 3.55; H. G. H lb. 4.00 

Sperm, Winter, Blea gal. 1.00-1.10 

Spruce lb. .90 

Tansy lb. 3.90 

Thyme, white lb. 1.50 

Turpentine gal. .80 

Valerian oz. .50 

Verbena, trne oz. .50 

Whale gal. .75 

Wlntergreen, Betula lb. 1.90-2.00 



Wlntergreen, Synthetic lb. .45-60 

Winterereen, true lb. 5.50-5.7(1 

Wormseed lb. 5.50-5.76 

Wormwood lb. 8.00-8.60 

Ointment, Mercurial, Vt M lb. .65-80 

1-3 M lb. .45-50 

CltMue lb. 4« 

Oleate, Meroury, 20 p. C, lb.. 3.00. .. .oz. .26 

Morphine, 5 p. c oz. .40 

Zinc, powd., lb., 2.50 oz. .30 

Opium (See Gum) . 

Panoreatin, ozs., .46 lb. 6.80 

Papain, ^urlfled oz. 50-60 

Papoid oz. 2.00 

jr-rafflne lb. .10-1* 

Paraformaldehyde, Tablets, Fries Bros., 

lb., 3.50 oz. .38 

Paris Green. 126-lb. kegs lb. 22 

14-lb. kits, .23; 2 and B-lb lb. .24 

1-lb., .26; %-lb., .27; W-lb II. 28 

Pastils, Black Fumigating lb. .30 

Red Fumigating lb. .36 

Paraform oz. .18 

Paraldehyde. Vi-lb. Dots lb. .80-88 

Pellotiue, Muriate, 1 and 5 gr. vlaU, 

grain .86 

Pental, 10-gramme vials each .76 

Pepper, Black, lb., .16-18; powdered. . .lb. .18-20 

White, lb., .25; powdered lb. .30 

Pepsin, Saccharated, lb., 1.00 oz. .12 

Pure, Armour's, lb., 4.50 oz. .38 

Cudahy's, scale, gran, or lnsol 3.59 

Peronin, 1-gramme vials each 1.00 

Phenacetin ozs. .38 

Pheno-Bromate, tablets or powder (10 ozs., 
less 10 p. c. ; 25 ozs., less 10 p. c. and 

5 p. c ) 01. 1.00 

Phenocoll, Hydrochloride, 25 grammes, vial 1.50 

Phosphorus lb. 1.00 

Pilocarpine, Muriate, 5, 10 and 15 gr. 

vials grain .4 

Piperazine, pure, 10 ozs., 8.80 oz. 4.28 

Piperin oz. .61 

Pitch. Black lb. .« 

Burgundy lb. .7-9 

Pixine, 2-oz. Jars doz. 2.00 

1-lb. Jars doz. 10.00 

Veterinary, 2-oz. tins doz. 2.00 

8-oz. tins doz. 4.00 

Plaster, Calcined, bbl., 2.00 lb. .3-4 

Dental bbl. 2.50 

Adhesive yd. .15-20 

Belladonna lb. 1.26 

Galbanum, D. S lb. .80 

Lead lb. .31 

Mercury C. 8. P lb. 1.00 

Pollantin-Dunbar (liquid or powder) ... .ea. 1.78 

Poppy Heads lb. .22-40 

Potash lb. .8-1* 

Potassa, Caustic White lb. .28 

Potassium, Acetate, bot. Inc lb. .36-40 

Bicarbonate, lb., .14; Bichromate. ... lb. .14 

Bromide, 5-lb. box, .27 lb. .8* 

Carbonate lb. .10-13 



EM 



1 



1 



Secure this business for Your store 

The surest way of securing the future 
patronage of your baby food customers 
is to sell them 

Mellin's Food for the Baby. 

Babies fed on Mellin's Food will be 
healthy and happy and strong, and the 
satisfied parents will naturally come to 
your store again and again, not only for 
Mellin's Food, but for the many neces- 
saries for the comfort of their babies. 

Cultivate this class of patronage, for it 
means increased profits for you. Keep your stock well in view — display 
the advertising prominently — and always recommend Mellin's Food. 
It may be depended upon absolutely. 

Attractive advertising matter upon request. 





Mellin's Food Company, 



Boston, Mass. 



as 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Chlorate, lb., .18; powdered lb. .18 

Citrate lb. .52 

Cyanide, Fd lb. .86-40 

Glycerophosphate oi. .18 

Bypophosphate, lbs., .80 oa. .10 

Iodide. B lbs., 1.95 lb. 2.06 

Nitrate, Gran., B lb*.. .11 lb. .12 

Permanganate lb. .18-20 

Prussia te. Bed lb. .B0 

Yellow lb. .20 

Solpboret lb. .18 

Propylamine os. .66 

Protarjol, oss.. 1.3B os at. 1.25 

Pyramidon oa. 2. IB 

(Juinalgen ot 1.28 

ftuaasone doz. 10.00 

ttuimne. Bromide ox. .48-52 

Muriate OS. .47-51 

Sulphate, balk oz. .14-17 

Sulph 1-oz. vials, B. & S oz. .22-21 

P. & W os. .22-24 

Blsulpbate, S-oz. can oz. .18-20 

1-oz. vials, B. St 8 oa. .26-27 

Tannate oz. .29-31 

Valerianate oa. .BB 

ftoinolin ozs. 1.00 

Resin, Common lb. .4-6 

Jalap os. .B0 

Leptandrln os. .35 

Podopbyllln, lb., 4.00 os. .35 

Seammony, V. S. P oz. .40 

Wblte lb. .6 

Resoroin. White, lb., 1.15 oz. .18 

Fries Bros., Crystal, lb., 1.12; powd..lb. 1.22 

Eespirazone, Tllden's pt. 1.03 

Rheumacilate, doz., 4.80 oz. .40 

Rheumatol ozs. 1.00 

Rhodina] II oz. 4.00 

Rochelle Salts lb. 23%-26% 

50-lb. boxes lb. .22-23 

Rodagen ozs. 1.00 

Root, Aconite Ib. .20 

Althea, lb., .28; cot lb. .35 

Belladonna lb. .20 

Berberls Aqulfollam lb. .40 

Bitter lb. .28 

Blackberry lb. .20 

Black Snake lb. .20 

Blood lb. .24 

Burdock, crushed lb. .20 

Calamus. Sliced, White lb. .40 

Calumba lb. .20 

Canada Snake lb. .80 

Cohosh. Black lb. .IB 

Colchicum, lb., .25: powdered lb. .30 

Coltsfoot lb. .40 

Comfrey, crushed lb .20 

Crawley lb. 1.75-2.25 

Curcuma lb. .IB 

Dandp'ion. cut, 5 lbs., .23 lb. .23-2S 

Dwarf Elder, oi lb. .20 

Elecampane, 5 lbs., .21 lb. .25 

Fern, Male Ib. .22 

Galangal. 5 lbs., .12 lb. .14 



Gelsemlnm lb. .90 

Gentian, 10 lbs., .8 lb. .12 

ground. 3 lbs.. .U lb. .IB 

powd., B lbs., .IB lb. .16 

Ginger, African lb. .17 

powd.. 5 lbs., .19 lb. .23 

Jamaica. Bleached, B lbs., .28 lb. .30 

Bl , powd.. 5 lbs., .29 lb. .34 

Unbleached. 5 lbs., .26 lb. .28 

Ginseng lb. 7.50-8.50 

Golden Seal lb. 2.95-3.15 

Gold Thnad lb. 1.10-1.20 

Hellebore. Black lb. .17 

White, powd., B lbs., .12 lb. .16 

Indian Hemp. Black, lb., .26; White .lb. .20 

Indigo, Wild, ozs lb. .25 

Ipecac, lb., 2.40; powdered lb. 2.13-2.05 

Jalap, lb., .46; powdered lb. 56 

Kava Kava lb. 1.00 

Licorice, lb.. .16-20; powd., B lbs., .12.1b. .16 

Lily of the Valley lb. .28 

Lovage, select lb. 1.10-1.20 

Male Fern, select lb. t8 

Mandrake, lb., .18; powdered l'v .22 

Masterwort lo. .28 

Mugwort lb. .18 

Musk lb. .28 

Nettle lb. 

Orris, Florentine lb. .17-19 

powdered lb. .17-22 

fingers lb. .88 

infant lb. 1.55-2. so 

Verona, powdered lb. .22 

Parsley lb. .20 

Pellitory lb. .46 

Pink lb. .66 

Pleurisy lb. .80 

Poke lb. .18 

Pond Lily. Wblte lb. .28 

Yellow lb. .28 

Queen of the Meadow lb. .20 

Rhatany lb. .28-33 

Rhubarb. China lb. .60-76 

China, cat lb. 1.00-2. 00 

powdered lb. .40-85 

Sarsaparilla, Hond lb. .60 

" cat Ib. .00 

Mexican, lb., .17; ground Ib. .21 

Senega lb. .152 

Seipentarla lb. .05-70 

Squill, select lb 10 

Stlllingia, lb., .18; powdered Ib. 25 

Unicorn lb. .40 

Valerian, English, lb., .42; German .lb. 3(1 

Virginia Snake lb. fic 

Yellow Dock lb. ..22 

Zedoary, pure lb. .!> 

Saccharin, lb., 2.25 oz. tin .2<' 

Saiioin. lb., 4.50 oz. 

Salol, lb., 1.00 oz. .It 

Salophen, 25 ozs., .95 oz. 1 ii" 

Saloquinine ozs. 1 2' 

Salicylate oz. 1.2: 



Sanatogen, 100 Gm per doz. 9.00 

200 Gm per doz. 17.28 

400 Gm per doz. 33.00 

Sanose os. .26 

Santonin, lb., 11.85-12.10 oz. 1.00-1.10 

Saola, Tllden's pt. .is 

"Save-the-Horse" Spavin Our* ($8.00) dos. 48.00 
Scopolamine, Hydrobrom Pb.O. (Identical 

with Hyosclne, D. 8. P.) grain .20-22 

Seed, Anise, Italian lb. .16 

Star lb. .30 

Angelic* lb. .46 

Burdock lb. .28 

Canary, Sicily lb. .6-7 

Cardamom. Aleppo lb. 

Malabar lb. 

Mangalore, bleached, extra lb. 1.50-1.68 

Celery lb. .20-22 

Colchicum, lb.. 55; powdered lb. .66 

Coiii urn lb. .25 

Coriander lb. .20 

Cumin lb. .18 

Fennel lb. .35 

Fenugreek, powd., 2B lbs., .8 lb. .16 

Flax, cleaned, bbl., 11.25 lb. .6-7 

ground, bbl., .6 lb. .7^-8. 

Hemp, bag, .*% lb. 6 

Henbane lb. .46 

Jambul nr. .28 

Larkspur lb. .80 

powdered lb. .85 

Ix>belia, powdered lb. .68 

Lovage. '.b... .63; powdered lb. .70 

Millet lb. .6 

Mustard. Black lb. 10 

White, lb., .10; powdered lb. .28-81 

Parsley Ih. .21 

Poppy, Blue lb. .11-13 

White lb. .26 

Pumpkin lb. .20 

Quince, French lb. 1.15 

Bape, English lb. .8 

German lb. .6 

Strophanthus, Green lb. .80-95 

Sunflower seed lb. .6-8 

Watermelon lb. .20 

Worm (Cbenopodlnm) lb. .14 

(Santonlca) lb. A) 

Silver. Nitrate, cryst., .lb.. 6.50 oz. .42-4* 

67 per cent., oz.. .87; 60 per eent..oz. .30 

Cone» os. .56-60 

Soap, Castile, Marseilles, box, .7% lb. .10 

Mottled, pure, box, .8 lb. .10 

White, Conti's, box, 6.00 lb. .13-16 

powdered, 25 lbs., .28 lb. .88 

Green (Sapo Vlr ). 10 lbs.. .12 lb. .13-18 

Eng. Bine Mottled Soap, cases, 112 lbs 5.5O-8.50 

Soda, Chlor. Sol doz. 2.2r 

Sodium, Acetate, pare, gran lb. .18 

Bicarbonate, Eng., keg, .03 lb. .4-8 

Natrona, keg. .02H lb. 3H-8 

Bminide, 5-lb. bulk, .28 lb. .30 

Carbonate, bbl., .1 lb. .2H 

Citrate lb. .80 



Ehrlich-Hata 606 

DIOXYDIAMIDOARSENOBENZOL 

This Great Triumph of Experimental 
Medicine which has excited such Intense 
and Universal interest, and 

173 OTHER INTRODUCTIONS TO MEDICINE 

from July, 1909, to June, 1910, are 
described in 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST HANDY GUIDE No. 8 



Sent Post Paid for 5 cents 



American Druggist Publishing Co. 

66 West Broadway, New York 



CONCENTRATED 



Registered 



Trade Mark 



^ BOUILLON 

One teaspoonful for a cup of 

Beef Tea 

™™ GALLON, $6.00 

Ready for shipment, sent to any R. R. or 
express station in Manhattan upon receipt 
of $6.00 



BOUILLON 
CAPSULES 

Merely drop a Capsule in a cup 
of boiling water and serve. 

For sale by all jobbers. Write for 
particulars to sole Manufacturers 

ROYAL SPECIALTY CO. 

25 Broad Street, New York. 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when ivriting to Advertisers. 



I 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



69 



Glycerophosphate 01. .18-25 

Bypopbosphlte. lb*., .00 lb. .10-14 

Hyposulphite, keg, .03% lb. .5-6 

Iodide, lb., 3.00 oz. .24-27 

Phosphate, eryat lb. .8 

Sodium Phosphate, 1 lb. earn lb. .10-12 

" 1 lb. tins lb. .12-14 

Salicylate lb. .40-44 

Silicate. Syrupy, bbl., .2% lb. .5-8 

Sulphate lb. .3 

Bomatoae. 2 oss doa. 8.25 

Borounal lb. .80 

Bonoidol oa. 1.15 

Sparteine, Sulph, B. & S oz. .60-85 

Spermaceti lb. .35-38 

Spermine, Poebl, box 4 to bee ea. S0O 

Spirit Ether Kit., O. 8. P lb. .52 

Streptolyptio Serum, Stearns', 20 Cc. in 

two sero-bnlbs of 10 Cc each 8.00 

Discoant, 25 per cent. 

Strontium, Nitrate lb. .20 

Bromide, lb., .50 01. .12 

Iodide oz. .30 

Lactate, lb., 1.26 oz. 

Salicylate, lb., .70 oa. .12 

Btrophanthin, C. P. cryat gr. .6 

Btryohnine, Crystals, %-oa. viala oa. 1.10 

powdered, %-oz. rials oa. 1.20 

Sulphate, % oz. rials oa. 1.20 

Glycerophosphate, ozs oa. 2.00 

8ulphonomethane, D. S. P ozs. .30 

lbs. 3.60 

Bulphonethylmethane. D. S. P ozs. .42 

lbs. 5.7r. 

Sulphur Flowers, bbl., .2% Ib. .4-5 

Precipitate, pure lb. .16-18 

Suprarenal Glands, Desslcated, powd., oa., 

2.00; tablets oa. 1.00 

Saccha rated 01. 1.20 

Tablets, 1 grain, per 100 40 

Capsules, 1 grain, per 100 .65 

Byoose, 2-oz. package eacb 1.00 

Takadiastase op. 1.70 

Llqulr, 8-oz. bote doa. 6.00 

Tar, N. C. pine. Diamond brand, pta. .doa. .05 

Tartar Emetic, powdered lb. .35-37 

Terebene lb. .65 

Terpin Hydrate, cryst oz. .10 

in bulk lb. .42-47 

Thigenol, lbs., 4.00 oz. .32 

Thiocol oz. 1.00 

Thioool Tablets, 100 In vial 1.25 

Thioform, 25-gramme pkgs eacb .50 

Thiol, liquid, oz., .40; powdered oz. .75 

Thymol (Thymic Acid), lbs., 2.65 oz. .27 

Thymol, Iodide oaa. .35 

lbs. 4.00 

Thyroids, desslcated, Cudahy'e lb. 7.00 

Tinct. Simulo, Christy's, lbs lb. None 

V, lbs., lbs.. 4.35; V4 lbs Ib. None 

Trional, 25 ozs., 1.40 oz. 1.50 

Turpentine, Spirits, bbls., .70 gal. .90-95 

Chian, oz., .45; Venice lb. .40 

Tuasol oz. 1.66 

U re thane. O. P oa. .64 

Uricedin, 5 ozs doz. 18.00 



Urotropin oa. .60 

Uro tropin Tablets, 5 or 7% grains doa. 3. 00 

Vaooine, Mulford'e (Discount, 40 per 
cent.), 1 pkg. Glycerlnlzed Lymph, con- 
taining 10 tabes 1.00 

1 rial Glycerlnlzed Lympb, containing 

sufficient for 50 vaccinations 4.50 

1 pkg. Ivory Points, containing 10 

polnta 95-1.85 

Glycerlnated. F. Steams A Co., Polnta 

(10 in a package) 1.00 

Tubes (10 tubes in one wooden box, ac- 
companied by one needle, rubber bulb 

and 10 temporary shields) 1.00 

Discount. 40 per cent. 
Laderle's Proteoted Vaooine Points box 

of 10 1.50 

Capillary Tubes (lndlvlually packed), 

eacb. .30 
Capillary Tubes (three In package), per 

package .60 

Capillary Tubes (ten In package), per 

package 1.50 

Vaccine (In vials); 10 vaccinations 1.36 

Vaccine (In vials); 20 vaccinations 2.60 

Vaccine (In vials); 50 vaccinations 6.00 

Discount, 25 per cent. 

Vanillin (various brands) oz .45-50 

Veratrine, Vfc-oz., 2.30; Sulph., %a oz. 2.20 

veronal, H-oz., oz., 1.60; 1-oz oz. 1.60 

Veronal Tableti. 5 grs., tubes, .15 ea. .40 

" " bote. 50 ea. 1.15 

" 100 ea. 2.25 

Water, Ammonia, 18 deg., carboy, .4.. lb. .8 

20 deg., carboys, .6 lb. .10 

26 deg. (Conct.), carboy. .8% lb. .10-12 

Wax, Bayberry lb. .30-36 

Carnauba. No. 1 lb. .60-65 

Cereslu, yellow, caaea, .12 lb. .15-18 

white, cases. .14 lb. .18-20 

Japan, cases, .12 lb. .16-18 

White, Star Brand, 60 lbs., .50 lb. .55 

White, S. B Ib. .35 

Leonard's T. L. Brand, 60 lbs., .47 60-55 

Of- " 60 lbs.. .42%... lb. .45-50 

Yellow, select lb. 38-44 

White Lead, Dry, pure lb. .10 

Zlno, American, lb., .10; French .... lb .15 

Whiting, bt.ls.. .% lb. .8 

Witch Hazel, Ext., 10 gals., .66 gal. .85 

Wood, Guaiao, rasped lb. .6 

Quassia Chips, bbl., .6 lb. 7-12 

Red Saunders, bbl., .4 lb. .6-8 

Sandal, ground lb. .40 

Yohimbin Hydroohlor, Vi-gramme vials. ea 6.00 

Tablets. 1 12 gr., 20 in tube each 1.10 

Zino. Acetate lb. 25-30 

Carbonate. Precip lb. .23 

Chloride, Granular, lbs., .25 oz. 6 

Iodide oz. .35 

Oxide lb. .10 

Hubbuck's, 7-lb. boxes, .35 Ib. .88-40 

Sulphate, bbls., .3 lb. .5-6 

Sulphocarholate, lbs., .36-38 oz. .7-9 

Valerianate, lbs.. 1.50 oa. .20 



PAINTS AND OOLOH8. 

Blaok, Coach. In oil lb. .18-26 

dry lb. .16-20 

Drop, In oil lb. .16-28 

dry. In oil lb. .13-20 

Ivory In oil, lb.. .18-26; dry lb. .12-18 

in Japan lb. .22-28 

Lamp, Geruiautown, aas'd papers, ',i lb., 

%-lb.. l ib lb. .13 

In oil lb. .10 

Black Lead, E I., 25 lbs., .6V4 lb. -8 

German. 25 lbs., .4% lb. .6 

Blue, Celestial, dry lb. .10 

Chinese, dry lb. .60 

In oil lb. .68 

Paint, in oil lb. .8 

Prussian, dry lb. .60 

in oil lb. .48 

Soluble, 10 lbs., .45 lb. .50 

Ultramarine, dry Ib. .15 

In oil lb. .20 

Brown, Sienna, burnt, dry lb. .4 

In oil lb. .10-18 

Raw, dry lb. .4 

In oil lb. .10-15 

Spanish, dry. bbls., .1 lb. .8 

Vaudyke, dry lb. .8 

In oil lb. .18 

Chalk, lump, bbls., .% lb. 

Green, Chrome, powd.. 6-lb. cans, .10.. lb. .13 

In oil Ib. .12-18 

Paris, bulk, lbs., 1 lbs., %-lbs.. "»i-Ibs., 

In oil lb. 

Litharge lb 10 

Pumioe Stone, bbl.. .6 lb. 8 

powdered, bbl., .3 lb. t 

Putty, In bladders, bbls., .2% lb. KVt 

in oil lb. 

Red, Indian, Eng . dry lb. .S 

In oil lb. .10-18 

Lead Ib. .8-10 

Orange Mineral lb. .13 

Rose Lake, Kng., dry lb. 

Pink. Eng.. dry lb 15 

Tuscan, Eng., dry lb ' 

In oil lb .23 

Venetian, dry, American, ibis 1 lb 2S 

Vermilion, American lb. 2( 

Chinese i<> >*< 

English 1'.. 8" 

Rotten Stone, bbl., .6 

Umber. Burnt, bbls.. .114 b 

Raw, bbls., .1% 1,1 * 

White, China, dry lb * 

Kin be, dry ■ Is IS 

I-ead, dry '•' If 

oil *•*•* 

Paris, English "> 

Whiting, bbls., .% 1" 

Yellow, Chrome, dry lb. 10-18 

In oil 1". W M 

Golden, In oil lb 10 

Ochre, French, dry, bbls., .1% 

American, dry, bbls., .1 lb .* 

Zinc, White, dry, American lb. 

In oil lb 1* 



FOR COMPARISON 

Get DOAIME'S Prices Before 
Placing Your Order for .... 

SEIDLITZ POWDERS 

CHAS. R. DOANE, Seidlitz Powders Exclusively, 1193 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y- 



PHILADELPHIA 
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

The oldest, largest and best College of Phar- 
macy In the United States. 

The College that educated DIehl. Ebert. Cob- 
lentz. Balberg, Eberle. Ryan and others equally 
prominent, and numbers among Its present 
(acuity. Remington, Sadtler, Kraemer, Moerk. 
LaWall. well known authors and teachers. 



COURS S OFFtRED 

PHARMACY. A very oomplete oourae leading to the degree of P. D. i Dou tor la 
Pharmacy) or P. C. (Pharmaceutical Chemist). 

MATERIA MEDICA, BOTANY, PRACTICAL BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY 

CHEMISTRY, Analytical, Pharmaceutical and Industrial, preparing the student for 
a professional career either as an Analyst or Teaoher, or, as a Manufacturing Chemiat. 

Bacteriologioal and Mioroscopioal instruction which can be taken with the above 
courses will fit the student for all lines of Industrial Chemistry. 

COMMERCIAL TRAINING. A course of speoial value to the Pharmaoist. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. A new course for 1910-1911 under the direotion of a Phy- 
sician and a Physical Director. 

Store employment with College privileges easily seoured, P. C. P. students being 
always in demand. 

For full information regarding entrance requirements, tuition, etc. addresa 

J. S. BEETEM, Registrar, 145 N. Tenth Street, Philadelph ia. Pa. 



GARROD 

Spa Lithia Water 

Foi (root, firavel and BUeumatisni 

WHOLESALE 
DISTRIBUTING AGENTS, 

CflAEES N.CRITTENTONCO. 



' J 'HE advertiser who gets his 
offering into the right kind 
of stores secures results. That 
is the reason old advertisers stay 
in the American Druggist and 
new ones constantly use our 
columns : they have found that the 
American Druggist goes into 
the stores of buyers. 



Mount Washington 



IMPERVIOUS 



BOXES for DRUGGISTS 

In strength, lightness, and 
beauty of finish, superior to all 
others. H oz. to 16 oz., Black 
Walnut and Silver Poplar. 
Specify " Mr. Washington " in 
ordering of wholesaler. 



M t. Washington 
Box Co. 

BOSTON. 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



American Druggist "WANTS" Page 



This department is intended to be used as a medium for the exchange or sale of stores, the employment of clerks, and th« 
iecuring of situations. The price for each insertion of fifty words or less is $1.00; two cents being charged for each addition*} 
vord. Remittance to cover the number of insertions desired must accompany the order. Do not send money in unregistered let- 
ters, as the publishers are not responsible for loss. Please send cheques or post office orders payable to the AMERICAN DRUG- 
GIST PUBLISHING COMPANY, 62 to 68 West Broadway, New York. 

The American Druggist is issued on the second and fourth Mondays of each month, and copy must be in the New York 
>ffice at least six days in advance of publication. 



SITUATIONS vacant 



WE WANT two or three more good sales- 
men. Men with established trade in the East- 
ern or Middle States can make immediate and 
permanent connection either on salary or com- 
mission. Ours is a first class pharmaceutical 
and specialty line. Hinton Chemical Co., 147- 
149 Cator Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



HELP WANTED— I want a pharmacist, reg- 
istered in Illinois; small country town; can 
use young or an elderly man; state salary 
wanted and reference in first letter. Lock 
Box 24, Inka, Marion Co., 111. 

WANTED— Salesmen to sell the Ideal Cap- 
sule Filler. Best mechanical device ever put 
on the market for the drug trade. Have flat- 
tering testimonials from many of the leading 
druggists. Applicants must have knowledge of 
drugs and mixing of same. Liberal commis- 
sions. Reference required. Baltimore Cap- 
sule Company. Baltimore, Md. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



SITUATION WANTED — By pharmacist; 
graduate; registered in Kentucky; twenty-seven 
years of age; seven years' experience; refer- 
ences. H. B. E., 7}4 N. Third St., Newark, 
Ohio. 



WANTED — Position by licensed pharmacist. 
Twenty years' experience, good references, 
moderate salary, American, married, all-State 
license. Address Pharmacist, 123 Fulton St., 
Auburn. N. Y. 



STORES FOR SALE 



FOR SALE, due to necessary dissolution, an 
established retail drug business in a city of 
over 125,000 inhabitants. The business is now 
paying the manager $2,000 salary and in addi- 
tion earning over $3,000 per year above all ex- 
penses. Apply M. A. T., care of American 
Druggist. 



NATHAN'S FOOT SPECIALTIES 



FLAT FOOT 



FOOT WITH 
ARCH 
SUPPORT 



The arch of the foot la 
held together by various 
sets of ligaments whose 
teudeney is to droop and 
weaken. This causes pain 
in the muscles of feet and 
ankles, and often extend- 
ing to calf, knee, hip and 
back. 

The relief is simply by 
the insertion in the shoe of 
NATHAN'S FLEXIBLE-CUSH.ONED 
NO-METAL ARCH SUPPORT 



It is easily adjusted to any shoe and 
flexes readily with the muscles of the 
foot. 

Equipped with Nathan's Arch Supports, 
anyone can enjoy walking without the 
slightest annoyance from sore feet. The 
supports should be worn by everyone, to 
protect the arch, if it be strong, and to 
relieve and strengthen it, if it be weak. 

For Weak Ankles use 

NATHAN'S PATENT VENT L- 
ATING CORSET ANKLE 

SUPPORT 

Good for sprained 
ankles, children learn- 
ing to walk, 
Skating and Athletics. Are recommended 
by surgeons and physicians. 

Send for booklet N.Y.M., on our various 
ankle supports, nrch supports, heel cush- 
ions, etc. It tells a simple method to 
find out whether or not you have a fall- 
ing arch or flat foot. FREE on request. 
NATHAN NOVELTY CO., 86 Reade St., NEW YORK 




STORES FOR SALE 

HERMAN HENRY BREUER, 149 Broad- 
way, Singer Building, Manhattan, N. Y. Hon- 
est Business Broker and 1892 Graduate New 
York College of Pharmacy (Department Phar- 
macy Columbia University). No charge for 
listing and advertising, no retainer and no 
bonus. No speculation; selling and exchang- 
ing for clients only. Commission three per 
cent.; small deals five per cent. Buyers served 
absolutely gra! -itously. Exchanging all kinds 
of businesses *or other businesses and Real 
Estate or Farms. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y., drug store, old estab- 
lished, desirable German section, cheap rent, 
attractive lease. Annual receipts $12,619.46, 
expenses $1,500.28, profits $2,953.16. Approxi- 
mate inventory $3,700, more or less. Inven- 
tory to be t3ken by stock clerks of any whole- 
sale drug house. Price $8,700, with $5,000 
cash -iDwn, balance arranged or sell at inven- 
tory. Mr. Breuer considers this an exceptional 
opportunity for a German speaking druggist 
and believes that one who thoroughly under- 
stands how to cater to German people can in- 
crease this business threefold. BREUER. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., old established, receipts 
$75 to $80 daily. Approximate inventorv 
$8,500 more or less. Price $8,500, or will sell 
at inventory; inventory to be taken by stock 
clerks of any wholesale drug house and to be 
paid by the purchaser. 

WANTED— Drug store in North Carolina 
or Georgia. Can pay $5,000 cash down. Will 
also consider a first class outfit of Bangs or 
other good make of drug store furniture; any 
hard wood, mahogany preferred. BREUER. 

MANY other drug store bargains every- 
where. Armour Hot Drink Apparatus and $25 
quantity requisites. Price for all $15. Breuer, 
149 Broadway, New York. 

DRUG STORES (SNAPS) FOR SALE in 
every State of the United States and Canada 
and positions for drug men anywhere in United 
States or Canada. F. V. Kneist, 542 Bee 
Bldg., Omaha, Neb. Established 1904. 

DRUG STORE FOR SALE— In Illinois 
town, 1,500 population; only store in town; 
nearest drug store five miles; stock, fixtures 
and fountain will invoice about $2,500; reason 
for selling; rent, $30, including heat and light 
Honey, care of American Druggist. 



ASSIGNEE'S SALE— I have for sale under 
the order of court a stock of drugs and fix- 
tures and furniture of a drug store in the 
best locality for business in the city of Val- 
paraiso, Porter County, Ind. The business is 
a live and going one and has been located at 
its present place for more than t"'enty-five 
years. Call and examine invoice and get terms. 
E. J. Gardner, Assignee, Valparaiso, Ind. 



ECLIPSE TOOTHACHE GUM 
$3.00 a Gross 

Buyers' imprint on Gross orders, 
or four Gross for $10.00 delivered. 
ECLIPSE TOOTHACHE GUM CO. 

361 W. Utica St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



CHR. HANSEN'S DANISH DAIRY 

PREPARATIONS and JUNKET PREPARATIONS 

Butter Color, Rennet Tablet*. Cheese 
Color Tablets, Junket Tablets, Junket 
Brand Buttermilk Tablets, Junket Brand 
Colors and Junket Brand Flavors. 

Manufactured by Chr. Hansen's Laboratory 
LITTLE FALLS. N. Y. 

SEE QUOTATIONS IN PRICES CURRENT 



BUSINESS opportunities 

PARTICIPATION— Chemist, Ph. D., wno 
has inventive ability and large experience in 
pharmaceutical and allied branches, wishes to- 
take active and financial interest in legitimate, 
well paying business. Address E. A., care of 
American Druggist. 

WANTED — Jobbers in Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut, Delaware. District of Columbia, 
Maine. Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jer- 
sey, New York, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, 
Vermont, and Detroit. Mich., to sell SODA 
FOUNTAINS. Exclusive territory. Excellent 
proposition. Leading manufacturer. Write 
for particulars. P. O. Box 135, Decatur, 111. 

FOR SALE — An old established drug busi- 
ness in Centra! New York State is now offered 
for sale to settle an estate; daily sales about 
$100; no fountain or side lines; investment 
about $14,000; a good business for two; a> 
rare opportunity. Toslyn S: McAuliff, Wieting 
Block. Syracuse, N. Y. 

TO LET FOR BUSINESS PURPOSES— 
Court Theater Building, Market and High Sts., 
Newark, N. T. Large store facing on three 
streets, suitable for an up to date druggist who 
will carry, besides a full line of drugs and 
medical goods, a first class line of candies, ice 
cream and soda, cigars and notions. Neighbor- 
hood will support a first class place. Inquire 
Nathan Myers, Court Theatre Bldg., Newark, 
N. J. 

SIDE LINE OF FINE BOX CANDIES 
wanted by a traveling salesman to the drug 
trade in New York State who has a wide and 
profitable acquaintance among leading pharma- 
cists. Only a first class line will be taken. 
Can furnish best references. Correspondence 
invited. Address Candy, care of Americas 
Druggist. 



LOEBER'S 

Reliable Iceless Soda Fountain; 

In Prominent New York Pharmacies 

Reliable 
Dependable 
Practical 
Low Prices 
Easy Terms 

H . G. LOEBER CO. 
151 Fast 126th St. New York 



FOR (litialii 
everything aboaO 
a drug store or a 
soda fountain tiers 
Is nothing equal tr 
Hoffman's 





BAR FIXTURES, 
DRAIN BOARDS | 

AND ALL 

Tin, Zinc, Brass, Copper. ( 
Nickel and all Kitchen and ( 

Plated Utensils. 
Class. Wood, Marble, Por- 
celain, Etc. 

CEORCE WM. HOFFMAN 



Barkeeper's Frieni 

Marble, Glass, 

Nickel, Brass, 
Copper, Tin and 
German Silver 

can all be cleaned 
and polished with It 
easier than witk 
anything else. Lrt 
us send yon a 
FREE SAMPLE. 




Highest Award, 
Chicago World's 
Fair, 1883, Louis- 
iana Purchase Ki- 
position, St. 
Louis. Mo.. 1904. 



GEO. WM. HOFFMAN 
ll» E. «.«hiir1«s «,. 
I.Ossawlu lal 

FOR SALE BY JOBBING. TRADE- 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



U 





Registered Trade Mark No. 54282 

CALCUTTA BRISTLES 

Do not confound this brush with the rub- 
ber back wire brushes. It is entirely 
different. The " Ideal " has an Air- 
Cushioned Back and Genuine 
Siberian Bristles. 
It is the best 
selling brush 
on the 
market 




Nothing Like It 
the Market 



on 



Order through your jobber, wholesale drug or dry goods 

HENRY L. HUGHES 

Manufacturer 

78 Monroe Street, American Express Building 
CHICAGO, ILL. 





ZODENTA TOOTH 
BRUSH HOLDER 



FREE ADVERTISING 
FOR YOU 




There are about five hun- 
dred wise druggists taking 
advantage of our free adver- 
tising offer. We extend this 
offer to you. All you have 
to do is to send us the names 
of one hundred people whose 
trade you desire. We will 
mail to each a proposition 
that will bring the majority to 
your store as buyers. Write us 
for particulars. Write today. 

We shall also be glad to 
furnish you with Window 
Displays and Counter adver- 
tising matter for both Zodenta and 
Milkweed Cream. 

F. F. INGRAM CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Canadian Branch: WINDSOR, ONTARIO 



BAYER PRODUCTS 

In Tablets of Our Own Manufacture 

In addition to tablets ot Iodothyrlne, Isopral and 
PIperazlne, we are now prepared to furnish the fol- 
lowing Bayer preparations in tablet form: ' 

ACIDOL 

8 grain tablets, tubes of io, boxes of io tubes. 

Acidol-Pepsin Acidol-Pepsin 



Strong 

6 grains Acidol, 2 grains pepsin 
Tubes of 10, boxes of is tubes 

Tiiyresol 

5 gr. tablets, cartons of 30 

Acet-Theocin- 
Sodium 

4 gr. tablets, bottles of 25 

Alypin 

V* gr., H gr., i l A gr. and 3% 
gr. tablets, tubes of 10 

Diaspirin 

5 gr. tablets, bottles of 25 and 
100 

Novaspirin 

5 gr. tablets, bottles of 25 and 
100 



Mild . 

% grain Acidol, 3 grains pepsdn 
Tubes of jo, boxes of 10 tubes 

Sabromin 

8 gr. tablets, tubes of 20 

Citarin 

1 5 gr. tablets, tubes of 20 

Agurin 

5 gr. tablets, bottles of 25 and 
100 

Helmitol 

5 gr. tablets, bottles of 25 and 
100 

Hedonal 

8 gr. tablets, tubes of 10 

Sajodin 

8 gr. tablets, tubes of 2* 



Veronal and Veronal-Sodium 

S gr. tablets, tubes of 10 and bottles of io*. 

These tablets are most carefully prepared. Tbey 
can be easily crushed and will disintegrate quickly 
on the tongue or in water. 

Supplied in Original Package* only 
Yoa will have call for them. Order a tapply from your jobber 

FARBENFABRIKEN OF ELBERFELD CO. 

P.O. Box 2162 New York 11*7 Hudson Street 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when zuriting to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




In order to avoid deplorable mis- 
takes on part of the public, do 
not put Lysol in a prescription 
bottle. The best stores will not 
sell Lysol to the public except in 
original two-ounce bottles at 25 
cents. The peculiar appearance 
of the original bottle and the ex- 
plicit instructions on the label pro- 
tect the buyer and yourself at the 
same time. 



LEHN & FINK 



New York 




The Salesman That 
Works for You 

The Necco Seal werks for you. It 
tells the story of clean, pure, whole- 
some confectionery, made in the 
largest confectionery factory in the 
country. Another help for you is 
the printed story of the superiority 
of Necco Sweets, appearing in all the 
leading magazines month after 
month. 

Characteristic of the goodness of the fa* and more varieties of 
Necco Sweet* are the famoue 

\\ v J i«Xlb.ui!k. 
S Fancy Bract 

Fareritea everywhere, because so unusually nod. 

The Necco package and penny lines are also good payers. The 
following is a partial list: 

It OKJTT PACKAGE GOOD* 
Hoses Ohooslate stasia Walnuts 
■oso* Oheeelat* Wlatergrooa 
Raoes OhsoolaU Vengatlaes 
a T ssss Oheeelate Almonds 
Room Ohooslate Asserted Vats 
Reese Ohooslate If slassos CMsp 
Tlotst FastiUes 



• omrr taokaox mods 



aooDfl 

Pee Wee Xettees 
Oolttf oot Book 
Pony Hearts 
Sweet Orange BUees 
Peek-a-Boos 
Lever's Dreams 
Amerioan rig Oea/eetisns 
Base Ball Oaps 



Beoeo Chocolate Creams, Asserted 
■eee* Pepsin Chewing Ouin 
Boose Ohooslate Peeaa Fait* 
B ssss Cheoelate Oream Oahos 
5oo poor Jmbbmr t»dmy . 



Oarmatloa Pastilles 
Neeee Oheeelate Mints 
Beeee Liearlee Drops 
Write as if km fa not tnppUmd 



NEW ENGLAND CONFECTIONERY CO., BwSttn. Hall. 



217 Per Cent. Profit 



3 dozen A-Corn Salve retails 
for 15 cents per box, or . $5.40 

2 dozen A-Corn Salve costs 
you $1.70 

I dozen A-Corn Salve costs 
you 0.00 1.70 




Profit . . $3.70 



THE DOZEN BONUS IS PACKED WITH THE 2 DOZEN 
REGULAR GOODS. YOU CAN ORDER OF 
YOUR REGULAR JOBBER 



GIANT CHEMICAL COMPANY 

PHILDELPHIA, PA. 
SMITH KLINE & FRENCH CO., Sole Distributors 




m 

4 *- . 



We are selling more No. 254's to-day 
than ever before. Why? Ask the man 
who owns one. 

You will find the same careful work- 
manship on our Counter Scales that is no- 
ticeable on our Rx Scales. 

SPECIAL. We have a few old style Tor- 
sions — capacities ten to twenty-five pounds 
Avoirdupois. Mechanically correct, but 
old patterns, for sale at greatly reduced 
prices while they last. 

Write for oar New Catalogue 

THE TORSION BALANCE COMPANY 

Factory and Shipping Address : 
147-9 EIGHTH STREET. JERSEY CITY. N. J. 
Offieoi 92 READE STREET. NEW YORK CITY 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when zvriting to Advertisers. 




S cind 11 harma miti rat 4? lYnrrl 



^meriGaj leading Dru^ Journal." 



571 



Vol. LVIII, No. 2. 
Whole No. 707. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 23, 1911. 



CHICAGO. 



40th Year 
Semi- Month ly 



It is well known that 

ESSENCE OF PEPSINE 

Fairchild 

is a real extract of the gastric 
glands and quite different 
from the ordinary pepsin 
mixtures. It is a satisfaction 
to the physician to be assured 
by the pharmacist that he dis- 
penses Fairchild's Essence 
unless something else is spec- 
ified. 

Fairchild Bros. & Foster 

NEW YORK 



McAVOY'S 
MALT 

MARROW 

A BIG SELLER 

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 
BY PHYSICIANS 
WIDELY ADVERTISED TO THE 
PUBLIC 

NETS YOU A LARGER PROFIT THAN 
ANY OTHER EXTRACT 

McAVOY MALT HARROW DEPT. 

2320-40 SOUTH PARK AVENUE 
CHICAGO - - ILLS. 



The Gelatine 

POST CARD 



ol Quality 



Quick Delivery 
Protection to the Trade 

THE ALBERTYPE CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MANY USERS OF 

prefer to purchase their favorite antiseptic in the 
original package, under the seal and guarantee of 
the manufacturer. The requirements of this trade 
are greater in winter than during the summer 
months. 

Are you amply prepared to supply the impor- 
tant and active demand for the several sizes of 
Jt ItSf ijlM^^jfe- j N THE Original Package? 



SWANSON'S 




TRADE MARK. 



5-DR.OPS 

CURES RHEUMATISM, NEURALGIA, 
KIDNEY TROUBLE and klndredailments 
For Sale by Your Jobber 

Send to us for Booklets and Advertising Matter 

Swanson Rheumatic Care Co., 



160 Lake St. 
CHICAGO 



Albany Chemical Company 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS. ALBANY. N. Y. 

A full line of chemicals — Medicinal, Photographic and for the Arts, 
Specify A. C. C, and if your jobber does not handle our goods write us 
lor quotations. 

SPECIALTIES : 
Chloroform. U. S. P.; Ether Sulphuric. U. S. P.; Hydrogen 
Peroxide. U. S. P.; Concentrated Nitrous Ether; Bismuth. 
Iodine and Mercurial Preparations. 



"YALE" ATOMIZERS 
"YALE" BREAST PUMPS 

and 

"YALE" FEVER THERMOMETERS 

are manufactured by 

BECTON, DICKINSON & CO., rutherford. n. j. 

Writ* ft Catalog 



PURE 
ALKALOIDS 

Specify "M. C. W." 

Conform to the Highest Standards for Purity 



MALLINCKRODT CHEMICAL WORKS 



WEBB'S ALCOHOL. 

THE ACKNOWLEDGED STANDARD 
JAMES A. WEBB & SON, 50-52 Stone Street (Hanover Square), New TorK City 



Index and Buyers' Guide, Pages 8, 9 and 41. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



"IT SELLS" 

is the testimonial Druggists give 

Wine of Cardui 



and the profit is very attractive. 



CFor cash it costs 
only $7.60 per doz. 
in $30 lots; $6.84 
per doz. in $100 
lots. J> J> & 



CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE COMPANY 
CHATTANOOGA, ST. LOUIS 



WE ARE HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

INSECT F»OWDER 
PRESSED HERBS 
Powdered and Ground Drugs 
Pharmaceuticals In Bulk 

ALLAIRE, WOODWARD & CO. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist* and Drug M fl lar * 
PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



SELLS AS SOON AS SEEN AT A GOOD PROFIT ! 



CASTILINA 

IN BARS 
AND CAKES 



is a Genuine Olive Oil Soap. 

Every one Buys it, because its Freshness, Purity and 
Quality are Apparent. 

Get it and you won't keep it. Order from your jobber 
or from 

J. E. ATHANASSIADES' SONS, 
71-77 Park Place, IM. Y. 

Factories and Mills, Island of Lesbos. 

Write for our interesting Booklet. 



These Playing Cards Mean Profits For You 

You should read this offer because it means money for you. A selected assortment of our new playing cards 
will be shipped to retailers prepaid East of the Colorado line on receipt of $25. 

This assortment is the newest and most complete ever offered. It includes standard sizes with many picture 
backs in beautiful colors. Here is the exact list with the cost to you and your profits: 









PRICE TO RETAILER 


RETAIL SELLING 


1 doz. 


No. 212 


Retail 15c 


I.20 


I.20 


I.80 


1 " 


No. 232 


" 20c 


150 


1.50 


2.40 


1 " 


No. 242 


" 25c 


I.80 


I.80 


3-00 


2 " 


No. 251 


25c 


2.00 


4.00 


6.00 


I " 


No. 262 


" 25c 


2.00 


2.0O 


300 


l A " 


No. 272 


35c 


3-00 


1.50 


2.10 


I " 


No. 353 


" 50c 


4.OO 


4.OO 


6.00 


1 


No. 414 


" 25c 


2.00 


2.00 


300 


y 2 « 


No. 424 


" 35c 


3.0O 


1.50 


2.10 


y? " 


No. 454 


" 50c 


4.00 


2.0O 


300 


1 " 


No. 616 


" 25c 


2.00 


2.00 


3-oo 


/a " 


No. 628 


" 35c 


3-00 


1.50 


2.10 










$25.00 


$3750 



Remember these cards are made by the American Bank Note Company, the same concern that engraves and 
prints the big issues of bonds, stocks and other securities for governments and banks. You can absolutely depend 
upon their quality and worth. 

If you are West of the Colorado line and will order a double assortment, costing $50 we will ship prepaid. 

You should write for samples and price list because you can please customers with these cards quicker than 
with any other cards on the market. Write us today. 

American Bank Note Company 

70 Broad Street, New York 
"Look for the Eagle's Head." 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



3 



MORE PROFIT FROM YOUR FOUNTAIN 

1" Take advantage of the demand for "StCCPO" Bouillon Cubes. 

T Serve Steero Bouillon at your fountain and add to its profit. 
This will also increase your SALES of 

"STEERO" 

[TRADE-MARK] 

BOUILLON CUBES 

Made by American Kitchen Products Company, New York. 

If They sell quickly after one trial because everybody likes 
Steero Bouillon for its delicious flavor and great convenience. 

Send for samples and try them yourself. Write for our 

SPECIAL OFFER 

Distributed and Guaranteed by 

Schieffelin & Co., 202 William St., New York. 

peter moller's 
Cod Liver Oil 

is a pure oil, free from disagreeable taste 
and odor. It digests readily, does not 
cling to the palate, and never "repeats". 

^ It is made and bottled by Peter Moller at 
the Norway fisheries. 

Not sold in bulk. You know you 
get the genuine when you receive the 
flat oval bottle bearing the name of 

Schieffelin & Co., New York, Sole Agents. 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST zvhen writing to Advertisers. 



4 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 





Breast 




Cell 



WARNING TO DRUGGISTS 



Notice of Infringement. 



Injunction Granted. 




Complete 
Bottle 



(J For some time back, De Wane B. Smith, of Utica, N. Y., doing business under the title — The 
Yankee Co., has been infringing our patents on the Hygeia Nursing Bottle and its 
parts, by putting on the market a nursing bottle, the combination and the character of which are 
similar to the Hygeia. This party, also, put on the market a breast-nipple bearing the first 
three letters (HYG.) of our trade-marked name — HYGEIA. We repeatedly warned said Smith 
of his infringement and unfair competition in business, and finally were obliged to begin legal 
proceedings against him. and recently the United States Circuit Court for the Northern District 
of New York granted our motion tor preliminary injunction. Now in force- 

The drug trade, knowing these facts, is requested to discontinue the purchase and sale of the 
Sweet Babee Nursing Bottle, and separate parts of the same; also, all rubber breasts, or glass 
cells, that are similar to corresponding parts of the Hygeia Nursing Bottle. 

The genuine Hygeia nursing bottle may be known by the name. HYGEIA, which 
name is marked in lull on the exterior of the breast near its base. All similar breast-nipples, 
that do not bear the full name HYGEIA, or those marked HYG., are infringements and not 
the genuine article. 

The Hygeia receptacle, or glass portion of our nursing bottle, has the name HYGEIA on 
the side of the cell, opposite to the scale, or on the base. All other cells similar to the Hygeia 
nursing bottle cell, and adapted for use with breast-nipples similar to the Hygeia. are infringe 
ments. 

Injunction granted us July 20, 1910, against Western Bottle M'fg. 
Co., Chicago, by U. S. Circuit Court, N. District of 111., Eastern Div. 

The Western Bottle Mfg. Co. have appealed. The appeal has not been argued, but will be 
soon. In the meantime, the trial of the case is going- forward, and testimony is now being taken. 

In neither of these cases do they deny infringement. 

It is significant, that the court in New York state, and the court in Illinois, entirely indepen- 
dent of each other, both granted preliminary injunction in our favor. 

The only source of supply for the Hygeia nursing bottle, is the Hygeia Nurs- 
ing Bottle Co., Buffalo, N. Y. The nursing bottle made by this company is thor- 
oughly protected by patents, and the trade is warned, that all infringements of those 
patents and of the trademarks and trade names of the company will be vigorously pros- 
ecuted. 



THE HYGEIA NURSING BOTTLE CO. 



BUFFALO 



NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



5 





HERE is something about 
a Becker-Iceless — a subtle, 
indefinable quality — that 
you recognize but cannot 
name. It's like a thoroughbred horse 
— its class shows in every line as 
well as in action. 

It is the "class" of the Soda Fountain market — and 
there is an affinity between classy merchants and the 
Becker-Iceless. 

Others may build fountains as good as Becker used to 
make — but never the equal of the down -to -date 
Becker-Iceless — because we are always from one to 
five seasons in advance of other makers. 

Just look at our 1911 model — all marble construction — 
with 50$ more insulation than in others. 

Don't take our word for it — we "show you." 
Write or wire us~ 



FA Hecker ComPs 

■ ^ i r INDEPENDENT SODA FOUNTAIN FACTO/ 

^ IN THE WORLD. ^- 



— Now is the time l 

TO BUY A FOUNTAIN J 

You get at least 

3 MONTHS' 
SERVICE 

Practically FREE 



The wise buyers 

buy early—and get the 
highest class of workman- 
ship as well as avoiding 
delays in delivery. 

Just sign and mail Xheyy 
coupon and our dem 
onstrator will call 
when in your y^, 



vicinity 



2262 S.HALSTED ST. CHICAGO 

PACIFIC COAST REPRESENTATIVES 
STEWART OBk HOLMES, 211 Third Ave. South, Seattle, Wash, 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when 




L. A Becker 
Company, 

Chicago. 
Send your salesman 
with full sized working 
r /y section of 1911 Model Becker- 
Iceless and easy terms propo- 
sition. No obligation on my part. 



Name 



Address 



American Druggist 

zvritin? to Advertisers. 



6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



PERIODICALS 

Read what two prominent storekeepers say who have 
sold Periodicals for twenty-five years. 



Winchester, Va., Nov. 29th, 1910. 
Gentlemen : — 

You ask me how Periodicals are selling. 
As you know I have a large business in other 
lines, but I consider Periodicals one of the 
best articles of merchandise I have on sale, 
and people who come in to buy a Periodical 
two or three times a week will sooner or later 
buy other goods ; in this way it creates trade. 
They are selling very well just now and seem 
to be on the increase. 

Very truly, 

T. T. WALL. 



THEY BRING IN TRADE 



Write for Catalogues giving full information 



The American News Company 

9-15 Park Place - - New York 



Easton, Pa., Dec. 15th, 1910. 

Gentlemen : — 

Periodicals are selling very well at present 
and although I have carried this line continu- 
ously for 25 years, I would not know what to 
do without them. My business in other mer- 
chandise is large, but Periodicals bring in the 
people, and also pay a good profit. 

Yours very truly, 

E. D. VOGEL. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



RESINOL OINTMENT, RESINOL SOAP 



AND 



RESINOL (Medicated) SHAVING STICK 

are jewels in hygienic value and marvels of 
effectiveness for the purposes for which they 
are recommended. They are indispensable 
in the toilet and nursery and thoroughly ap- 
preciated by those who regard a good com- 
plexion, beautiful hair and a scalp free from 
scurf and dandruff. 

USED JUDICIOUSLY AND IN TIME EVERY FORM OF 
CUTANEOUS DISEASE COULD BE CURED IN ITS 
INCIPIENCY BY RESINOL OINTMENT 

As an application to burns, scalds, abrasions 
and minor injuries and inflammations of the 
skin, it is better than anything else. 
Both Soap and Ointment should be kept in 
all well regulated households — the one for 
the daily bath and the other for such acci- 
dents and incidents as are likely to occur. 

RESINOL (Medicated) SHAVING STICK 

makes unnecessary the use of lotions after 
shaving, because the Resinol in it soothes, 
heals and protects the skin. 
For sale by all leading wholesale and retail druggists 
of America. 

RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Baltimore, Md., UJS. A, 




"Every Coat We turn out a Winner" 

Druggists and Dispensers Coats 

«j Your personal appearance will be improved by 
wearing our made to measure coats, thoroughly 
shrunk. We have a large variety of styles and 
strictly washable materials. Cut shows style No. 5 
made from any material desired. 
fT Write for our swatch card showing styles, ma- 
terials, and prices, free upon request. We can fit 
you properly by mail. Free delivery to all parts 
of the world. 

WE IS SK ELD BROTHERS 
1 1 7 Nassau Street :: :: :: NEW YORK 



Madam Dean's Antiseptic 
Vaginal Suppositories 



A PERFECTLY RELIABLE VAGINAL ANTISEPTIC 
Price $3.50 per dozen. Retails at 50c. per Sox 

Sold by all Jobbers or order direct from 
^ THE UNITED MEDICAL CO., Inc. 
P.0,Box No. 74-. Send for Free Sam pies. LANCASTER,PA.. 



"THAT'S WHAT THEY ALE SAY " 

Perfumes made from Wolmark Concrete Fl ower Oils last longer, and 
cost half. Try them. 

Make a good perfume, and save 100 per cent. 
Make a good Customer by selling a better Perfume. 
Let it be something new for your trade. 
Let it be your exclusive make. 

Our odors suit the most delicate taste. Write for our new price list 
and Formulas book. Select your odors. We recommend the following: 
Violet de Parme....@ $2.25 per oz. Corylupsis du Japan® 2.0* per oz. 

Dear Kiss Fleurie . .@ 2.2s per oz. Honey Suckle @ $1.75 per oz 

Lilac Swiss @ 1.25 per oz. 

And one hundred and two other Oils listed. Soon you will use Otto 
of Rose Synthetic W. C. C. The sooner the better. This Otto is 
stronger than the Natural. To give finish to your toilet Preparations, 
use "WOLMARK'S SYNTHETICS." 

WOLMARK CHEMICAL CO. Formerly Flora Chemical Co. 
113 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



IT CAN'T SPILL 



Solidified 
Smelling Salts 

"SUPREMA" 



C Sales are especially good 
just at this time of year — 
closed houses, stuffy rooms 
and headaches. 

C It is a real novelty (and a 
Stearns quality). Something 
different, pleasing and satis- 
fying to your best trade — 
and profitable to you. 

C. And the selling points 
are unusual — if the bottle 
tips over nothing runs out 
to spoil fine linen or furni- 
ture, it will not liquefy in 
any climate, lasts longer, and 
has a very diffusive odor. 

CL Make a note now on your 
want list for Suprema Smell- 
ing Salts — you will be glad 
that you got it. 



The dozen $4.00 



Retail 50 cent, 



Frederick Stearns & Co. 

Detroit, Michigan, U. S. A. 

Windsor, Ont. London, England New York City 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Buyers' Guide. 



If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supplied. 



for Alphabetical Index See Page 41 



ALCOHOL 

Webb, James A., & Sons, New York. 

ANTIPHLOGISTINE 

Denver Chemical Co., New York. 

ANTITOXIN 

Fritsche Bros., New York. 
Mulford & Co., H. K., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Pasteur Vaccine Co., Paris; Branch 
houses, New York and Chicago. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Schering & Glatz, New York. 

Stearns, Frederick, & Co., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Schieffelin & Co., New York. 

BEESWAX 

Leonard, Theo., Paterson, N. J. 

BOTTLE CAPS 

Wirz, A. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOXES 

Mt. Washington Box Co., Boston, 
Mass. 

Read, E. B., & Son, Baltimore, Md. 
Sheip, Henry H., & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

BOXES, TIN 

American Can Co., New Y'ork. 
American Stopper Co., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

BRUSHES 

Imperial Brush Factory, New York. 
Hughes, Henry L., Chicago, 111. 

CANDIES, CHOCOLATE, ETC. 

Allegretti Chocolate Cream Co., New- 
York. 

Huyler Chocolate Co., New Y'ork. 
Runkel Bros., New York. 



CAPSULES 



Merz Capsule Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Planten, H., & Son, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CASH REGISTER 
The National Cash Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio. 

CEMENT 

Major Mfg. Co.. New York. 
Russia Cement Co., Gloucester, Mass. 

CHEMICALS 

Albany Chemical Co.. Albany. N. Y. 
Kiiner & Amend. New York. 
Farbenfabrlken of Elberfeld Co. 
Fritzsche Bros., New York. 
Vlalllnckrodt Chemical Works. St. 

Louis. Mo., and New York. 
Merck & Co.. New York. 
New York Quinine & Chemical Wks.. 

New York. 
Pasteur Vaccine Co.. Chicago. 
Parke. Davis A Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
Powers & Welgbtman. Philadelphia. 

Pa. 

Schering & Glatz, New York. 
Schieffelin & Co., New York. 

CHEWING GUM 

National Licorice Co.. Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

New England Confectionery Co . 

Boston, Mass. 
Sen-Sen Chiclet Co.. New York. 

COLLAPSIBLE TUBES 

Wirz. A. H.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

COLLEGES 

Albany College of Pharmacy. Albany. 
N. Y. 

Buffalo College of Pharmacy. 

Phllad.-liihlii College of Pharmacy. 

Philadelphia. 
University of th» St»te of New 

Jersey, Jersey City, N. J. 



CORKS 

Armstrong Cork Co., Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Brauer, Justus, & Sons, Philadelphia . 
Pa. 

Whltall Tatum Co.. New York. 
COURT PLASTER 

Carpenter Chemical Co.. Detroit, 
Mich. 

New-Skin Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CRUDE DRUGS 
Allaire. Woodward & Co.. Peoria. 111. 

DRUGGIST COATS 
Welssfeld Brothers. New York. 

ELECTRIC SIGNS 
Art Sign Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ray, S. E.. Mfg. Co.. Danbury. Conn. 

ESSENTIAL OILS AND FLAVOR- 
ING EXTRACTS 

Allen Stafford & Sons. London. E. C. 
Athanassiades Sons, J. E., New 

York. 

Wolmark Chemical Co., New York. 
Fries Bros., New York. 
Fritzsche Bros.. New York. 
Ongerer & Co., New York. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

American Druggist Fire Ins.. Co., 

Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Druggist Indemnity Exchange, St. 

Louis. 

FIXTURES AND FURNITURE 
Revell. A. H.. & Co., Chicago. 111. 
Seger & Gross Co., New York. 

FOUNTAIN PENS 
Waterman Pen Co., New York. 
Royal Specialty Co., New York. 

GASTRIC JUICE 
Laboratories of Applied Physiology 
of France, New York. 



GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES 

Elmer & Amend. New York. 
Whltall Tatum Co.. New York 
Hygeia Nursing Bottle Co., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

GRAPE JUICE 
Welch Grape Juice Co.. Westfielo. 
N. Y. 

HARMONICAS 

Hohner. M., New York. 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 
Whltall Tatum Co.. New York. 

INFANTS' FOOD 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co.. New 

York. 

Horllck s Malted Milk Co.. Raele. 
Wis. 

Smith. Kline & French, Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Mellin's Food Co., Boston, Mass. 
INKS 

Davids Co., Thaddeus, New York. 
LABELS 

Read. E. B.. & Son. Baltimore. Mrt 
Mott Label Co., W. A., Norwalk, 
Conn. 

MACHINERY. ETC. 
Colton, Arthur, Comoany. Detroit. 
Mich. 

Wirz, A. H.. Phlladelpnla. Pa. 

MALTED MILK 
Borden's Condensed Mlik Co.. S>» 

York. 

Horlick's Malted MIU Co.. Raeln.. 
Wis. 

MINERAL WATERS 
Garrod Spa Lithla Water Co.. »i. 
Louis. 

NEBULIZERS 
Becton-Dicklnson A Co.. New York 
PASTEURIZERS 

The Thermoton Co., New York. 




Ditman's 
SEA-SALT 



FOR PRODUCING 
REAL SEA WATER 
AT HOME 



Murray's 
Charcoal 
Tablets 

HAVE BEEN THE 
STANDARD FOR OVER 
25 YEARS 

A. J. DITMAN 

2 Barclay Street, NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



9 



Buyers' auide.- Contlnued - 

If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supphcvi. 



PHARMACEUTICAL AND PRO- 
PRIETARY PREPARATIONS 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co., Chicago, 111. 
Allaire, Woodwurd & Co., Peoria, 111. 
Ammonal Chemical Co., New York. 
Anglo-American Drug Co., New York. 
Antikamnia Cbem. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Bauer Chemical Co., New York. 
Breitenbach, M. J., Co., New York. 
Bristol-Myers Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Burroughs, Wellcome & Co., London. 
Centaur Co., New York. 
Chattanooga Med. Co., Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

The Cudahy Tacking Co., South 

Omaha, Neb. 
Denver Chemical Co., New York. 
Doane, Chas. K., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Drevet Mfg. Co., New York. 
Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fairchild Bros. & Foster, New York. 
Fellows Medical Mfg. Co., Ltd., New 

York. 

Fries Bros., New York. 
Fritsehe Bros., New York. 
Hoffman, Geo. W., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hoffman-La Roche Chemical Works, 

New York. 
Lambert Pbarm. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
McAvoy Brewing Co., Chicago, 111. 
Merck & Co. 

Mulford Co., H. K., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Munyon's Homoeopathic Home Rem- 
edy Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Oakland Chemical Co., New York. 



Pabst Extract Co., Milwaukee. Wi». 

Parke. Davis & Co., Detroit. Mich. 

Personeni, J., New York. 

Pinex Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Planten, H., & Sons, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Schleffelln & Co.. New York. 

Scott & Bowne, Bloomfleld, N. 1. 

Sharp & Dobme, New York. 

Smith. J. P.. New York. 

Smith. Kline & French Co., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Smith. Martin H.. Co.. New York. 

Swanaon's Rheumatic Cure Co.. Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Sylvester's Haarlem Oil, New York. 
Wampole 4 Co.. Henry K.. Phlladel 
pbla. Pa. 

Wells. Richardson Co.. Burlington. 
Vt. 

Wyeth. Jno.. & Bro.. Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Young, W. F.. Springfield. Mass. 

PINEAPPLE JUICE 

Dole's Pure Hawaiian, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

PLAYING CARDS 

American Bank Note Co., New York. 
Dougherty, A., New York. 

POSTAL CARDS i SOUVENIR) 
Albertype Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
American News Co., New York. 
Bouton & Co., Inc., J., New York. 
Kropp. K. ('.. Co.. Milwaukee. W1n. 
National Color Type Co., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

RAZORS 

Simmons Hardware Co.. 81. ixmla. 
Mo. 

Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 



RUBBER GOODS 
Davol Rubber Co, Providence. R. I. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

SCALES 

Torsion Balance Co.. New York. 

SHOW CASES 

Detroit Show Case Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
Revell. A. 11. , & Co., Chicago, 111. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 

Becker Co., L. A., Chicago, 111. 
Green & Sons, Robt. M.. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Liquid Carbonic Co., Chicago. 
Loeber Co.. Henry G.. New York. 

SODA FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES 

American Cbem. Co. 

Doering & Son Co., Chicago. 111. 

Hawaiian Pineapple Products Co., 
Ltd., San Francisco, Cal. 

Mosteller Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

Smith, J. Hungerford, Co.. Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

SPICE HILLS 
Allaire, Woodward & Co.. Peoria. 111. 

STATIONERY, ETC. 
American News Co., **«>w York. 

STERILIZERS 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

STOPPERS, SPRINKLER TOPS 
ETC. 

Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 
Wirz, A. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 



SUPPOSITORIES 
Schleffelln & Co.. New Torn. 

SYRINGES 

The Marvel Co., New York. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

SYRINGE BOXES 

Sheip. Henry. & Co.. Philadelphia. F'«. 

THERMOMETERS 

Becton.Dlcklnaon Co., New York 
Kessllng. E.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York 

TOILET SPECIALTIES 

Graham, Mrs. Gervaise, Chicago, 111. 
Hall & Ruckel, New York. 
Hudson & Co., New York. 
Hydrox Chemical Co., New York. 
Ingram Co.. F. F.. Detroit. Mich 
Kress & Owen Co.. New York. 
Lambert Phar. Co.. St. Louis, M<. 
Loreley-Duplex Mfg. Co., New York. 
Resinol Co.. Baltimore. Md. 

VACCINES 

Pasteur Vaccine Co.. Parts: brand. •» 
New York and Chicago 

VACCINE VIRUS 

Parke. Davis & Co.. Detroit, Mlci 
Pasteur Vaccine Co.. Paris: branct>-» 

New York and Ch'eago. 
Stearns, Frederick. & Co.. Detroit, 

Mich. 

Mulford, H. K., Philadelphia. Pi 



It is our firm and honest 

CONVICTION 

that by having a policy with us retail druggists secure 
not only a direct premium saving, but an added advantage 
which money cannot buy from any other Insurance Com- 
pany. The following letter explains just what we mean. 

December 5th, 1910. 
The American Druggists' Fire Ins. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio: 

Gentlemen: — This is to acknowledge receipt of your Voucher 
Check for $593.35 to cover your portion of my recent loss by fire. 

In this connection, I desire to express my hearty appreciation 
of the entirely satisfactory manner in which you handled my loss. 
I am thoroughly convinced that every retail druggist in the coun- 
try should place a portion of his insurance with your company. 
I take this position for the reason that the insured, in case of 
loss, not only receives the protection afforded by other Companies, 
but, in addition, he is aided materially in securing a satisfactory 
and proper adjustment of his loss. 

It is my purpose to place a larger amount of my insurance with 
your company in the future. 

With best wishes for your continued success, I am, 
Very truly yours, 

Edward Williams, 

Madison, Wisconsin. 

This is not a MUTUAL or INTER-INSURANCE 
CONCERN. SURPLUS as to POLICYHOLDERS, 
OVER a QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS. 

Write to 

The American Druggists' Fire Ins. Co. 

1215-1216 Mercantile Library Bldg. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



TABLOID * 

• TnADl HARM., 

KEPLER brano 
ENULE 



S 0 L 0 I D BRANP 

HAZEL I N E 
ELi X 0 I D 




rhe sale of 
are s 



pecil 



of these brands 
unlawful 



Full lines of these and other B. W. & Co. Products 
are always kept in Stock at the Firm's Houses 
and at the following Depots: — 

Seattle, Wash. — The Stewart Holmes Drug Co.; Boston. Mass — Eastern Drug Co.; 
Chicaco, 111— E. H. Buehler ; Portlano. Oklc— The Clarke-Woodward Drug Co.; 
Philadelphia. Pa— Smith. Kline & French Co.; Sax Francisco. Cal. — Langley at 
Michaels Co. ; St. Ixhjis, Mo — Meyer Bros Drug Co. 

CANADA 

Toronto— W J. A. & H Carnahan ; Winnipeg, Man — W. F. C Brathwaite 
Depots in all principal Cities throughout U.S.A. and Canada 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



THE contract for a fountain for the new Wanamaker Store has been 
awarded to ROBERT M. GREEN & SONS. 

The new Wanamaker Store is the largest in the world under one 
roof. It occupies a full city block, 1 2 stories above and 2 below ground. 
There are 45 acres of floor room and 33 million 600 thousand cubic feet 
of space. 

Wanamakers installs the Green Fountain for no other than strictly 
business reasons. Theirs was a large question — a problem — how to serve 
an enormous clientele with speed, with profit to the store, and with 
satisfaction to customers. 

The answer was a Green Iceless installation. 

This is worth your attention for the simple reason that no test on 
earth could more conclusively prove that Green Fountains, whether large 
or small, are the best for quality, for design, for mechanical features, for 
speed, for profit and for service. 

Write for portfolio of designs adapted to your needs, and special 
payment proposition. Local Agents in all States. 




r _>OBERI n. GREEN &S0N 



1413-25 VINE ST. PHILADELPHIA 

Established 1874 Oldest House in the Business 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU 'CO 1ST when writing to Advertisers. 



# 



T 



■HIS is the 
most im- 
portant soda fountain 
announcement you 
have ever read, be- 
cause the fountains it tells about are 
the most perfect ever built. 

Study the mechanical details of every 
cut, then fill out the coupon and let us 
tell you about the superb tops and back 
bars that go with them. 



All Marble 
Construction 



And Processed Cork 
Insulation are dis- 
tinctive " LIQUID " 
creations and those 
who follow, follow at a distance. 

The "Unit" system — still exclusive with 
"The Liquid" — insures a perfect fit of 
parts and is flexible to meet any in. 
crease in business that follows. 




The 
Liquid 
Carbonic 
Company 

Please give further 
particulars about your 
1911 line of fountains, and 
your Spring-Dating plan. This 
request carries no obligations to buy. 



American Druggist, New York, N. Y. 



*5 CRATED REA 



A Few of Our Big Line of 1911 

Our "Ready" line of highly perfected "Stock" 
machinery, in hundred-lots or larger, instead of one-by 
careful, personal attention could be given to every detail. 




Get the benefit of the tremendous ad- 
vertising advantage of being first with 
a new 1911 outfit. 

Save yourself the worry and loss 
that is too often the lot of the man 
who waits too long. 

Get a better built fountain at greatly 
reduced cost, and reduce your overhead 
expense. 






DY TO SHIP 

Model "Stock Iceless" Fountains 

outfits was built at greatly reduced cost, by special 

Rear and front 

-one — the usual way — during the dull season, when m 1 ^ 8 jU' 

»■ .'• let*. , 

Great variety of superb tops and bases to choose from. _____ 




All Tennenef 
marble unit*, coun- 
ter slab* and 
bating. 





Study Our Spring - Dating Plan 

It gives you the benefit of Winter dis- 
pensing, largely on our capital. 

When the Spring rush begins you are 
ready for it; your men are expert in hand- 
ling the fountain, and, like-as-not, the profits 
between now and Spring will pay for the 
whole outfit. 

For full particulars, fill out coupon on 
front page of this insert., 






MARKS A THIRD EPOCH 
IN SODA FOUNTAIN CON- 
STRUCTION - another evidence • of 

''Liquid Leadership 

Solves once for all the problem of de- 
livering cold sodas by eliminating the draft stand. Unobstructed counter — short, easy 
reach to serving slab — leader pipes fully iced and insulated — a beautiful, business- 
like, speedy, economical dispensing machine. 




Rear View 
12-ft. marble and 
onyx Clear Counter Service Iceless 

. A soda fountain that has created a sensation — the highest 
type of sanitary, insulated, all miner al-and-metal iceless construction. 

The climax of the whole " Liquid " history of endeavor. 




Let us tell you all about this new and 
better creation of 

"The House of Better Things'* 

Fill out the coupon on the first page 
of this insert and mail to the nearest 
" Liquid " branch. 

^&hf-f£sw www jf" Gcu^iu^rUe 

JACOB BAUR^^^^^^^CMCAGO New York Boston 
Pres. and Treat. W Pittsburg Cincinnati Milwaukee Minneapolis 
Atlanta St. Louis Kansas City Dallas San Francisco 





No firm in the 
business begins to approach 
[The Liquid " in its mastery of marble 
ind onyx in both material and workmanship. 

For decorative effect we also 1 

furnish the clear counter service /u^'i^ij^ 

Iceless with superb illuminated L. -^-j^* 
standards and shades. 




AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



The druggist's stock should always 
include 

Mrs.Winslow's 
Soothing Syrup 

On the Market for Over 60 Years 
An Old and Well-Tried Remedy 

meeting all requirements without the 
slightest objection of any kind. 



POR MAS DE 60 ANOS 

El Jarabe Calmante de Mrs. Winslow 

Ha Sido un Remedio Antiguo Bien Probado 

Lo han administrado Mlllones de Madres k sus Nlnos durante el perfodo de la 
Dentlcion, con excelentes resultados. Calma al Nino, resblandece las enctas, 
palia e dolor, cura el cdllco de gas, y cs ei mejor remedio para la dlarrea. Es 

inofensivo en absoluto y es el mejor remedio para la Dentici6n de los Ninos. 

Pidase con Segurldad el 

JARABE CALMANTE de MRS. WINSLOW, 

y engase slempre exlstenclas de ello. 

THE ANGLO AMERICAN DRUG CO., New York, U.S.A. 



SPECIAL OFFER From Nov. 15th, 1910, to May 15th, 1911 

In conjunction with our Extensive Advertising Campaign this season, we have decided to make the following 
Special Offer to the druggists of the United States : 

For displaying our signs one week, or more, and purchasing 

6 Doz. SYRUP OF FIGS AND ELIXIR OF SENNA at $4.00, less 5 %, % Dozen Free 
12 Doz. SYRUP OF FIGS AND ELIXIR OF SENNA at $4.00, less 8 %, 1 Dozen Free 
24 Doz. SYRUP OF FIGS AND ELIXIR OF SENNA at $4.00, less 8%, 2 Dozen Free 

Freight prepaid on 24 dozen order, but not on smaller lots. 

To get the benefit of the above Special Offer sign one of the Special Offer blanks, to be had of us or of all 
wholesale druggists, stating quantity desired and send to your wholesaler. This Offer is not open to aggressive 
cutters. 

Our Prices are Right; our Discounts Liberal; our Advertising Extensive; our Remedy Excellent. 
Now is the time to get the benefit of this Special Offer. Yours very truly, 

CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO. 



The Pure Food Law Special Prices when ordered 

in bulk packages. 

prohibits the sale or any 
but strictly pure 

Extract Vanilla 

WYETH'S represents the True Flavor 

of choice Vanilla Beans 

FREE FROM ANY ADULTERANT 
PURE AND WHOLESOME 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER :: Philadelphia, Pa. 

INCORPORATED 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST ivhen writing to Advertisers. 



i6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



We Lead; Others Try to Follow! 
iff n ifu r n ■ i a i 




Quality, De- 
sign and 
Workmanship 

are repre- 
sented in the 

Highest 
Degree by the 
"Strenuous" 
Outfit 



Call or write, and you'll wonder j ^X^B P^^. ' ^^^^k Credit extended and all fixtures 

" How we do It " for ■r^^P^KZ a m^^t^P^^JF guaranteed 

All our outfits are READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY and are shipped complete, as shown in Illustration 

SEGER &, GROSS CO., 42 to 60 West 67th St., NEW YORK 

ELEPHONE 1041 COLUMBUS Originators and Makers of High Grade Druggists Fixtures at a price within the reach of ail. 



CHEMICALS 

MEDICINAL TECHNICAL 

P-W-R 

POTASSIUM IODIDE 

Crystals or Granular 

BISMUTH SUBNITRATE 

White, Bulky, Tasteless 



Specify P-W-R Original Packages 



Complete List on Request 



Powers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co. 



NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



ST. LOUIS 




-PHARMACY-STUDENTS- 
-PURCHASE-THE- BEST- 

Answers to Questions 
prescribed by Phar- 
maceutical State 
Boards. 8vo. 303 pp. 
Price $1.50 net. 

JOHN JOS. McVEY 
Publisher Philadelphia, Pa. 



Mount Washington 



IMPERVIOUS 

BOXES for DRUGGISTS 

Id strength, lightness, and 
beauty of finish, superior to all 
others. !4 oz. to 16 oz.. Black 
Walnut and Silver Poplar. 
Specify " Mt. Washington " in 
ordering of wholesaler. 



Mt. Washington 
Box Co. 

BOSTON. 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



17 



W.T. CO. VASELINE ATOMIZERS 

hr Melting and Spraying Vaseline and Similar Ointments, and Atomizing Medicinal Oils. 
Of Superior Material and the Best Workmanship and Finish. 

The glass bottles in all our Vaseline Atomizers are specially annealed to stand 
changes in temperature, so that medicated vaseline or heavy oil can be melted in them, 
either over a flame or in hot water, and applied to the nose and throat in a fine volumin- 
ous spray. 

The bulbs are of best quality rubber, elastic and durable. The valve is seated in a 
neck, and cannot work loose. 

All metal parts are substantially nickel-plated. The curved liquid tube will take up the contents of the bottle almost 
to the last drop. 

Each In box. 1/4 dozen In package. 

With Detachable Throat and Nasal Tubes of Metal. 
No. 30 $10.00 Per dozen 

DISCOUNT XO THE TRADE 40% IN PACKAGE LOTS 40.10% 

For full line of ATOMIZERS see pages 104 to 111 Inclusive of our 1911 catalogue 





WHITALL TATUM COMPANY 



NEW YORK 
46 and 48 Barclay St. 



PHILADELPHIA 
410-416 Race St. 



BOSTON 
91 Washington St., North 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
576 Mission St. 



SYDNEY, N. S. W. 
10 Barrack St. 



A full line of samples of our goods can be seen at our sample rooms, Nos. 120-122 Franklin St., Chicago. 



No. 77 BE-SS-T DISHER 




THE BE-SS-T DISHER has exclusive features: 

1. Bowl and frame are punched out of SHEET SILVER. 
The strongest Disher made. 

2. It is made of High Grade Silver and is non-corrosi ve. 

3. Highly Polished and Buffed. No plating to peel off and 
always looks well. 

4. 'The Most Sanitary Disher made — smooth shank — no 
mechanism to clog with cream. Facilitates dispensing. 

5. The easiest 
disher to operate 
and take apart for 
cleaning. All mech- 
anisms are enclosed 
and parts may be 
detached and read- 
justed in a mo- 
ment's time. 

6. A 6-Months* 
Guarantee — At- 
tached to each Dish- 
er is a card contain- 
ing a six months' 
guarantee and di- 
rections for operat- 
ing the Disher. 

Price $1.50 



Jewel Saniiary Straw Dispenser 

The lrame is made of metal 



Saves time and 
money. Protects 
straws from flies, 
dust and microbes 
and serves from 
either side. Posi- 
tively dispenses one 
straw at a time. 




Price each. Plated or Oxidized, $2.25 



Unique Cone Filler No. 87 Saniiary Cone Dispenser 




Made of solid German Silver, 
highly polished. No plating to peel. 
Does not get out of order. By 
pressing lever cream is discharged 
into cone. Made only in four 
sizes, penny, 16, 20 and 24 to quart. 

Price, all sizes, each. $1,001 



Something New. Show your cus- 
tomers that you are serving Cones 
without dust or microbes on them. 

It will increase your business. 

One Cone at a time is removed 
instantly with either hand. 

Frame is made of metal, plated 
and highly polished. 

No mechanical parts to get out of 
order. 

Machine is constructed so it ab- 
solutely does not break or mar the 
Cones. Door closes automatically. 

Price each. $2.75 




If your Jobber can't supply |ff n6 fp|]p P ||ff n f n 322 West Indiana St. 
you. order from IMUMCIICI 1111(1. LM. Chicago. 111. 

Makers of the most up-to-date line of Dishers, Cone Fillers, Lime and 
Lemon Squeezers, Strainers, Peanut, Match and Gum Vending 
Machines, Sanitary Straw Dispensing Machines, etc. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



t8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



A Frequent Prescription! 





7 




Anusol enjoys wide and 
increasing professional favor. 
Please keep a supply to 
meet the demand. 



INSTEAD OF COURT PLASTER 



Package 
Difficulties 
Solved 



The old hard-to-open hermetically sealed ioc. New-Skin package 
has been replaced with a new easy-to-open package with the fol- 
lowing features: Evaporation-proof aluminum screw cap. Glass 
rod, instead of brush, on cork. Paper carton instead of brass 
box. No more complaints about the New-Skin package. 



NEWSKIN CO. 



DEPT. 
P. 



98 GRAND AVENUE 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



" * * *(Beg.U.S.%PatOtt) \ ™ *f 

is the one and only absolutely uniform 
and unalterable solution of iron and 
manganese in the form of true organic 
peptonates. It is also the one and 
only preparation lawfully entitled to 
be known as "Pepto-Mangan," a valid 
trademark, which is our exclusive 
property. We respectfully request the 
trade to take due notice of these facts. 

M. J. Breitenbach Co. , New YorK, u. s. a. 



Do you 
Kjiobtf your Obtm 

StocK? We 
Doubt It. Very 
Fetor Druggists 
Do \7nless 
They \/se 
The 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST'S 
PRICE BOOK A 



7 




It only costs $1.00 It helps 
you know where you are at, 
commercially. A very impor- 
tant thing in these troublous 
times. 

The cut shows how the pages 
look. There are 200 of them, 
4x7 inches. 



The book is printed on good 
quality writing paper, is bound 
in grain seal leather. We will 
send it by mail on receipt of 
$1.00. THOUSANDS OP 
DRUGGISTS USE IT, ALL 
LIKE IT. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING CO. 



66 West Broadway, New York 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



10 



Growth of the American Druggist 

DURING 1910 

An Unprecedented Number of New Subscribers 

Joined the Army of Readers of the AMERICAN DRUGGIST. 
There is no drug paper which has had a growth equal to it. 

OUR CONTRIBUTORS 

In the volume which closes with this number, contributions appeared from the most prominent 
writers on pharmacy, including - among others the following : 



Prof. JOSEPH P. REMINGTON, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Prof. ALVIZO B. STEVENS, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Prof. JOHN URI LLOYD, CINCINNATI, 0. 

Prof. CHARLES CASPARI, JR., BALTIMORE, MD. 

Dr. 4. B. UONS, DETROIT, MICH. 

Dr. HARVEY W. WILEY, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Prof. CARIES BASKERVILLE, NEW YORK 

Prof. HENRY V. ARNY, CLEVELAND, 0. 

Prof. PHILIP ASHER, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Prof. WILLIS G. GREGORY, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



Prof. T. ASflBY MILLER, RICHMOND, VA. 
Prof. E. G. EBERLE, DALLAS, TEXAS 
GEORGE M. BERINGER, C\MDEN, N. J. 
MARTIN I. WILBERT, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
WILLIAM A. PEARSON, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
JOHN K. THUM, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
WILHELM BODEMANN, CHICAGO, ILL. 
OTrO RAIBENHEIMER, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
FREDERICK A. UPSHER SMITH, ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Dr. WILLIAM MMR, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



GEORGE P. FORRESTER, DARMSTADT, GERMANY. 

THE AMERICAN DRUGGIST 

Is the Leading Pharmaceutical Journal of America 

and Ls scientific, technical, business and news departments are unequaled by those of any other drug 
publication 

DURING 1911 

new featu'es will be added and so far as it is possible to make improvements in the contents of the 
paper they will be made. 

As in the past the 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 

Will in the future be 

Indispensable for Progressive and Enterprising Pharmacists. 



YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION RATES, INCLUDING POSTAGE: 

United States, Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines $i-50 

Canada 2.00 

Great Britain 12s. 6d. 

Germany m. 12 

France f . 15 

British India r. 9 

ADVERTISING RATES QUOTED ON APPLICATION. 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING COMPANY 

i 66 WEST BROADWAY NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



20 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Be able to Fill Orders for 

PINEX 

the Big Selling Cough Remedy 

This remedy was designed by a pharmaceutical 
chemist to take the place of a thousand and one 
home-made remedies used by housewives to cure 
coughs. 

People that used to come to the druggist for five 
cents' worth of glycerine and a nickel's worth of 
Horehound tea, licorice, or something else, are now 
buying 50 cents' worth of Pinex. 

They get a better remedy and they pay the drug- 
gist a better profit. 

Pinex has created a lot of brand new, profitable 
cough medicine sales to a class of people who 
would not buy an ordinary cough syrup. 

If you're not selling it you should. We guaran- 
tee the sale. Unsold bottles returnable at any 
time. 

Any jobber will supply you. $4 per dozen. Re- 
tails at 50c the bottle. 

The Pinex Co. Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



A. H. WIRZ 



WHITE METAL GOODS 

913-915-917 Cherry Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA 



Bottle Stoppers 

Tin Spouts for Bu j 
Poisons 



Collapsible Tubes 

METAL SYRINGES 

Hand Pill Machines 

Moulds lor 
Suppositories 

Collapsing 
Drinking Cups 





United States Dispensaf oi y 

19th Edition 

Based on the Eighth Decennial Revision of the United States Pharmacopoeia 



HORATIO C. WOOD, 
M.D.. LL.D. 



EDITED BY 

JOSEPH P. REMINGTON. 
PH.M., F.C.S.. F.L.S. 



SAMUEL P. SADlLLh, 
PH.D.. F.C..'- 



Assisted by A. B. LYONS. M.D., and H. C. WOOD, Jr., M.D. 



"A wonderful repository of information concerning drugs and she teals. 
* * * The druggist who has the book at hand for reference need neve' »e at a 
loss when confronted with any of the constantly recurring problems ai the dis- 
pensing counter."— AMERICAN DRUGGIST, June 10, 1907. 



2,008 pages. Illustrated. Imperial 8vo. Cloth, $7.00; Sheep, $8.00. Hall RostU. M.f( 

With patent Index, 50c additional 



ORDER FROM 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING COMPANY 

66 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



21 




MAJOR'S CEMENT THE STRONGEST ON EARTH 




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22 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



MUNYON'S 

HOMEOPATHIC 

REMEDIES 

Prepared Upon the Most Scientific Methods by Leading Chemists 
and Skilled Homeopathic Physicians 

They contain no dope or any substance that is harmful 
and are used with great success throughout the civilized 
world. 

Druggists and fair-minded physicians concede that 
Manyon's Homeopathic Remedies have had more indi- 
vidual endorsements than any medicines ever placed upon 
the market. 

$500 AOft MS B££N APPROPRIATED TO ADVERTISE A!VD FURTHER STIYtU 
lME TH£ SAL£ Qf 1HESE p , mAR MEDICINES DURING 1911 

NOTICE TO DRUGGISTS: 

The Government has decided that the word "Cure" that has 
been on our cartons and labels is contrary to the Pure Food Law. 
When our attention was called to this, we immediately had the 
printed matter changed so that it would comply with the Pure 
Food Law in every particular. Any druggist who has any of our 
Remedies on hand with the word "Cure" on them will confer a 
great favor on us by returning same for fresh goods. 

There has never been a question about the efficacy of 
Munyon's Homeopathic Remedies, for there are thousands 
of people in every State who have given their unqualified endorse- 
ment. Of course, there are cranks who believe that Homeopathic 
Medicines are nothing but sugar, from the fact that the dosage is 
so minute that analysis cannot be made of same by the ordinary 
methods. 

For cabinets, advertising matter and full particulars concerning 
these Remedies, address Munyon's Homeopathic Home 
Remedy Company, 53d and Jefferson Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when tvriting to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST 

and PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



PHILADELPHIA 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 23, 1911. 



CHICAGO 



ISSUED SEMIMONTHLY BY 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING CO. 

NEW YORK, 62-68 West Broadway. 

A. R. ELLIOTT President. 

CASWELL A. MAYO, Ph.G Editor. 

THOMAS J. KEENAN Associate Editor. 

Yearly Subscription Rates, Including Postage: 
United States, Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico and the Philippines. $1.50 

Canada ' 2.00 

Great Britain 12s. 6d. 

Germany rn. 12 

France f • 1 5 

British India r. 9 

advertising rates quoted on application. 

The American Druggist and Pharmaceuticall Record is issued on 
the second and fourth Mondays of each month. Changes of advertise- 
ments should be received ten days in advance of the date of publication. 

Remittances should be made by New York Exchange, post office or 
express money order or registered mail. If checks on local banks are 
used 10 cents should be added to cover cost of collection. The publishers 
are not responsible for money sent by unregistered mail, nor for any 
money paid except to duly authorized agents. All communications should 
be addressed and all remittances made payable to American Druggist 
Publishing Company, 62-68 West Broadway, New York. 

Entered at New York as Second Class Matter. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorial Comment: 

Our Index Folio Numbers, The Foster Bill, Do Not Punish the 
Innocent 33 

A Bond an Unnecessary Expense. Indiscriminate Licensing, Kill It. 
Pharmasisters in Roumania, Educational Changes in Great Brit- 
ain, Two Classes of Qualifications 34 

Raising the Standard Too High, Pharmacy Past and Present, 
Aniline Dyes and the Extermination of Disease, The New Ger- 
man PharmacoDoeia 35 

Pharmacists Should Retain Original Prescriptions 36 

Original Articles: 

Ancient Problems in Modern Pharmacy, by Dr. James J. Walsh; 
A Page from the Papyrus Ebers; The Role of Dyestuffs in 
Medicine, by Herman A Metz 37-41 

Notes. Queries and Answers: 

Massage Cream, The Dose of Chromium Sulphate, Elixir of Sac- 
charin, Kings County Formula for Mist. Rhei et Sodae, Pleasant 
Emulsion of Codliver Oil. Etching on Glass, Keratin Pill Coat- 
ing, Ointment Formula, The Quantitative Estimation of Alcohol, 
The Removal of Caffeine from Coffee 43 _ 44 

Letters to the Editor: 

Possession of U. S. P. and N. F. Obligatory on New York Drug- 
gists; The Pennsylvania Labeling Law 44 

Talk op Books: 

The History and Chemistry of the Essential Oils. Technical Forrrui- 
las and Processes, Notes on Commercial Oils. A Manual of 
Practical Pharmacy, Mahin Advertising Data Book, Cosmetics 
and Toilet Preparations, Words Interesting to Pharmacists 45-46 

Advertising Business and Accounting: 

Midwinter Publicity, by Frank Farrington 47 

News of the Drug World 49-60 

Review of the Wholesale Drug and Chemical Market 61-62 

EDITORIAL COMMENT 

With the beginning of the present vol- 
Our Index Folio time our readers will have noticed a 

Numbers change in the method of numbering the 

reading and advertising pages. The ad- 
vertising pages are numbered consecutively at the top of the page 
from cover to cover, while the reading pages bear the folio num- 
bers for purposes of indexing at the bottom of the page. So, if 
it is desired to cite the page number of an original article, an 
editorial article or any other article printed in the reading forms, 

Index 



it will be necessary to give the index folio number at the bottom 
of the page. We find it necessary to make this clear, as some of 
our readers have already erroneously cited the advertising folio 
number where the index folio was intended to be given. 



The Foster Bill 



From the statements made at the hear- 
ing on the Foster bill to regulate the 
interstate traffic in narcotic drugs, it 
would seem that no one is really satisfied with the Foster bill, 
save possibly Dr. Wright, who drafted it, Mr. Koch and W. S. 
Richardson. All the gentlemen who appeared at the hearings, ex- 
cepting Dr. William Muir, of Brooklyn, started out with the 
assertion that they were in favor of the bill, but every one, in- 
cluding Dr. Wiley, found some fault with the measure. Even 
Mr. Koch, of Philadelphia, who has done great service to the 
state in his work on the suppression of illegal traffice in cocaine, 
mildly suggested at the hearing on December 14 that prepara- 
tions containing a minimum of narcotic drugs might be excepted 
from the operation of the law. At the subsequent hearing on 
January 11 he did not press this point, but seemed quite willing 
to accept the bill as it now stands. A Mr. Towns, who con- 
ducts a private hospital in New York, said that no proportion of 
any narcotics was so minute as to be harmless. Albert Plaut, of 
Lehn & Fink, urged the restriction of the law to opium and co- 
caine and their derivatives and preparations. Dr. Wiley urged 
the expansion of the list of restricted drugs so as to include caf- 
feine, acetanilide and all the drugs used for headache cures, and 
wanted the license $100 for each retailer instead of $1.00. The 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue proposes a substitute which 
increases the cost of the tax and does away with the bond. It 
will be seen that however admirable may be the object of the 
bill, and all agreed on that, the methods followed in attaining 
that object are open to the severest adverse criticism. 



Do Not Punish the 
Innocent 



The reputable retail druggists of the 
United States are unanimous in 
their desire to protect the public 
from the illegitimate use of narcotic 
drugs. The fact that a very small minority of the trade abu?e 
their privileges in the indiscriminate sale of these drugs offers 
no better reason for the wholesale condemnation of the druggist 
than does the dereliction of a Government drug inspector in 
Philadelphia for a condemnation of Dr. Wiley. There are dis- 
honest men in all callings, and the laws are made to catch the 
rogue, even though they have to discommode honest men. But 
in drafting laws to catch the rogue pains should be taken to 
a\oid inflicting unnecessary hardships on the honest men. We 
are confident that by cordial co-operation between the Govern- 
ment officials and the leaders among the retail pharmacists, it 
would be possible to evolve some law which would be practica- 
ble and efficacious without being unduly burdensome in its oper- 
ation. 

page 33 



2* 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



According to the Commissioner 
A Bond an 01 Internal Revenue, as cited by 

Unnecessary Expense Donald McKesson, no internal 

revenue laws now require bond of 
anybody except the manufacturer, as it is unnecessary from a 
wholesaler and retailer. Surely the evidence of the Commis- 
sioner of Internal Revenue should be sufficient on this head. He 
finds it possible to administer the internal revenue laws without 
•nsisting on a bond, and that fact is really ample answer to those 
who wish the retail drug trade subjected to the annual tax of 
the bonding companies, which, according to Mr. Plaut, would 
more likely be $15 or $20 a year than $5 or $10. 



Indiscriminate 
Licensing 



If the license feature is adopted it should 
be restricted to those licensed under 
local laws to practise medicine and 
pharmacy. Hospitals and scientific in- 
stitutions should not be excepted from the law. It would be an 
easy matter for a man engaged in illegitimate traffic in narcotics 
to establish or obtain control of a private hospital which would 
enable him 10 carry on his sales without any supervision. If the 
object of the law is to enable the local authorities to trace sales 
of narcotic drugs, and we have been assured that it is, this will 
be accomplished by the use of a serial number label in some 
form prescribed by the Revenue Bureau, which would do away 
with the necessity for the use of the stamps of smaller denom- 
ination. In any/ case, there is no danger from the use of di- 
luted preparations of the drugs, except possibly from the medi- 
cines intended for infants. 



It is almost useless, however, to attempt to point 
Kill It out tne method by which the bill might be rendered 

at least practicable of enforcement. The measure is 
so full of faults, is open to so many objections from so many 
points of view, would in operation present so many difficulties 
and effect so little good, that by all means the best thing to do 
is to kill it and begin afresh. Henry P. Hynson, appearing for 
the American Pharmaceutical Association, set forth very clearly 
many of the serious objections which might be raised to the 
measure. We believe that it would have been very much better 
had those who appeared at the hearing come out frankly as has 
the American Druggist in opposition to the measure because of 
faults rather than to assert that they favored the measure and 
then point out those faults. As a matter of fact, the attitude 
of the American Druggist in this matter, and that taken by 
the New York State Pharmaceutical Association and the Kings 
County Pharmaceutical Society, seems much more logical, much 
more frank and less disingenuous than that of many of the gen- 
tlemen who appeared ostensibly in favor of the bill, but at the 
same time pointed out most convincingly its faults. 



Roumania is a country deserving of 
Pharmasisters in special recognition by the suffragettes 
Roumania pharmacy, in fact its Minister of the 

Interior ought to receive an illuminated 

address from the militant pharmasisters, since he has done so 
much to recognize the rights of women. From the time that 
women were given equal rights as regards pharmaceutical edu- 
cation with the male citizen in countries in which the exercise 
of the profession is restricted by the concession system, it has 
been questioned how the governments would deal with an ap- 

Index 



plication for a concession made by a duly qualified woman phar- 
macist. The Roumanian government has set all doubts at rest, 
as in that country both sexes are to enjoy absolutely equal rights. 
In case, however, of a feminine holder of a concession marrying 
a foreigner she loses, ipso facto, the right of continuing the busi- 
ness. In addition to this restriction it is particularly required 
that the lady concessionnaire shall by no means consider her 
pharmacy in the light of a possible dowry, this is stipulated to 
prevent the property passing into nonprofessional hands ; only in 
the case of her marriage with a duly qualified pharmacist may 
the business be considered as joint property. 



The system of pnarmaceutical 
Educational Changes education in Great Britain is on 
in Great Britain ' tne eve 01 a complete change, and 
it seems probable that in the near 
future a compulsory curriculum will be established in connection 
with the qualifying examination ordinarily termed the minor, 
and that this examination will be divided into two parts. Under 
the existing system the Council of the Pharmaceutical Society 
of Great Britain, which is the examining authority, has no power 
to compel candidates to undergo a definite course of tuition, and 
the result is that a large proportion of those who present them- 
selves for examination are not properly prepared, and a high 
percentage (something like 65 percent.) in fact are unsuccessful. 
After repeated attempts, the earliest of which was in 1887, to 
secure from Parliament powers to alter the educational system, 
the Pharmaceutical Society succeeded in obtaining such powers 
by insertion of a clause in the poisons and pharmacy act of 
1908. This clause empowered the society to make bylaws pro- 
viding for the division of the qualifying examination into two 
parts, and for the institution of a compulsory curriculum, and 
the council is now engaged in making arrangements to put these 
powers into effect. 

As a preliminary step the council has 
Two Classes ol submitted a draft scheme to local phar- 
Qualiiications maceutical associations and schools and 

colleges of pharmacy for consideration. 
This scheme proposes to divide the minor examination into two 
parts, called intermediate and final. It requires a candidate 
desiring to enter for the intermediate examination to produce 
evidence that, subsequent to passing the preliminary examina- 
tion and being registered as a student, he has attended and has 
performed the wcrk in the class and in the laboratory, in a teach- 
ing institution approved by the council, not less than 50 lectures 
in botany, 25 hours' work in practical botany. 100 lectures in 
chemistry, 300 hours' work in practical chemistry, and 25 lectures 
in physics. A candidate desiring to enter for the final examina- 
tion must have passed the intermediate examination, and produce 
evidence that he has been engaged for three years after registra- 
tion as a student, under the supervision of a registered chemist, 
in the ordinary work of pharmacy, including the translation and 
dispensing of prescriptions ; and that he has attended and has 
performed the work in the class and the laboratory, in a teaching 
institution approved by the council, not less than 60 lectures and 
demonstrations in materia medica, 30 lectures in pharmacy, 200 
hours' work in practical pharmacy, 20 lectures in dispensing and 
prescription Latin, and 100 hours' work in practical dispensing. 
It is not proposed to raise the standard of the examination. The 
society itself conducts an official school of pharmacy at Blooms- 

page 34- 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



25 



bury square, London, and the question which is exercising the 
minds of the principals of the various independent schools and 
colleges is whether the independent institutions will be approved 
by the council ; but the fact that the scheme has been submitted 
to them for consideration lends color to the belief that the 
council is desirous of approving of all such colleges where there 
is satisfactory evidence that proper instruction can be given. 
These unofficial schools ' have done excellent work in the past 
and it would be regrettable if they ceased to exist. 



It is not in New York State 
Raising the Standard alone that protests are heard 
Too High against raising unduly the stand- 

ard of pharmaceutical education. 
The subject is attracting attention in England, and circulars have 
been distributed by committees protesting that "the present sylla- 
bus more than covered the necessary requirements of the present 
day pharmacists." The objections raised to the syllabus estab- 
lished by the New York State Board of Pharmacy find a power- 
ful echo among English pharmacists, who contend there is no 
need for a higher standard than formerly prevailed. As is urged 
in New York, our English confreres say, Let pharmacists who 
are desirous of following higher scientific work pursue their 
studies to that end ; the average pharmacist is seldom or never 
called upon to perform scientific work in actual business, and the 
higher requirements only serve to prevent many promising 
youths from taking up the study of pharmacy, the emoluments 
being deemed insufficient for the expense involved in preliminary 
study and the succeeding course at a college of pharmacy. 



It would be, of course, somewhat far 
Pharmacy fetched to say that in the progress of 

Past and Present tne ages we have reached in an ascend- 
ing spiral a point analogous in condi- 
tions with those that prevailed in pharmacy in Rome in the time 
of the Csesars. It is a coincidence worthy of note, however, that 
the pharmacists of those days were called pigmentarii, that is, 
dealers in colors, and some of the writers of that period speak 
of aloes as a pigment. From dyestuffs of that character to the 
synthetic compounds of the modern chemist is a far cry indeed, 
and the circumstance would be scarcely worthy of mention if 
there were not other coincidences of resemblance between the 
art of the apothecary as practised in ancient days with that of 
the modern pharmacist. In many instances that might be cited 
does the pharmacy of the past find reflection in the present, and 
this is brought out with a wealth of illustration and in fasci- 
nating style by the accomplished historian of medicine who lec- 
tured the other day before the New York branch of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association, and whose paper is printed in 
full on another page. 

The success achieved by the 
Aniline Dyes and the German school of experi- 
Exterminatlon of Disease mental therapeutics in the 

application of derivatives of 
coal tar to the extermination of certain diseases has served to 
focus attention anew on the role of the dyestuffs in medicine. It is 
a new science which Professor Ehrlich has founded in combin- 

Index 



ing the methods of the physiological chemist with the dye chem- 
ist, but it would be a mistake to suppose that the chemothera- 
peutical results achieved by him were a sudden stroke of genius, 
for they followed as a natural consequence on the thirty years' 
work which he had spent in efforts to determine the affinity of 
coal tar colors for parasites in the blood. He demonstrated that 
different bacteria behaved differently towards different colors, 
some absorbing one and some the other. By means of the ani- 
line dyes the parasites of malaria, sleeping sickness, and syphilis 
were recognized, and by an extension of the work begun in this 
way a means of killing the disease germs without any poisonous 
action upon the patient was elaborated, the culmination of his 
long series of experiments being 606 or salvarsan. 



THE NEW GERMAN PHARMACOPOEIA. 
II. 

HP HE interesting and important work recently contributed by 

* an American investigator (American Druggist, December 
12, 1910, page 330) on the determination of melting points serves 
to point a comparison with the physical constants in the new 
edition of the German Pharmacopoeia and the methods of ascer- 
taining them. As previously noted in reviewing this work, a chap- 
ter is devoted to a description of the methods to be adopted in 
applying a certain number of tests, first among which figures the 
determination of the melting point. 

\17ITH the exception of fats and fatty substances, the melt- 

* ' ing point of w r hich is determined in a slightly different 
manner, the following procedure is followed : The substance is 
finely powdered and left in an exsiccator over sulphuric acid for 
at least twenty-four hours, unless stated conditions are specified 
in certain cases. A thin walled glass tube, closed at one end 
and having a diameter not exceeding 1 Aim., is charged with the 
substance to a height of 2 to 3 Mm. The tube is attached to 
a thermometer in such a way as to put the column of substance 
on a level with the mercury bulb. The thermometer with the 
tube attached is then introduced into a test tube of 30 Cm. length 
and 1.5 Cm. diameter, in which there is sulphuric acid to a height 
of 5 Cm. ; the upper, open end of the tube must be about the 
level of the acid. This test tube is introduced into a flask with a 
neck 3 Cm. in diameter, and a bulb with a capacity of 80 to 100 
Cc. After introducing the test tube with the thermometer, etc., 
it is filled with sulphuric acid so that the acid occupies about 
two-thirds of the neck of the flask. The acid is then heated 
over a free flame. When the temperature of the acid is about 
io° C. (50° F.) below the melting point of the substance to be 
tested, the heating should proceed so slowly that an increase of 
1° C. should require about half a minute. The temperature at 
which the opaque substance becomes transparent and forms drops 
is to be regarded as the melting point. 

IN the case of fats and similar bodies, a slightly different pro- 
cedure is directed to be taken. In the first place, the fat is 
melted and a U shaped, thin walled glass tube of 0.5 to 1 Mm. 
diameter is filled with the melted fat to an equal height in both 
branches. The tube is now placed on ice for two hours, or kept 
at a temperature of io° C. (50° F.) for twenty-four hours, to 
completely solidify the fat. The tube is then attached to a ther- 
mometer in such a manner that the column of fat is on a level 

age 35- 



26 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



with the mercury bulb. The thermometer with the tube attached 
is then introduced into a test tube with a diameter of 3 Cm., con- 
taining, to just below the orifices of the tube, a mixture of equal 
parts of glycerin and water. The mixture is heated slowly, and 
when the column of fat becomes transparent and is perfectly 
clear, the melting point has been reached. 

""P HE boiling point is determined in two slightly different 
* ways, according to the object in view. If the identity of 
the substance is to be ascertained, a thin walled glass tube, closed 
at one end, having a diameter of 3 Mm., is charged with one or 
two drops of the product to be tested, and to prevent retardation 
of the boiling point, an open capillary tube is introduced, of 
which, at a distance of 2 Mm. from the end dipped in the fluid, 
the capillary has been melted up. The tube is attached to a 
thermometer and the further procedure is identical with that de- 
scribed under the determination of the melting point. When an 
uninterrupted column of bubbles begins to rise, the boiling point 
has been reached. 

I F the degree of purity of a body is to be tested by the^Sfter- 

* mination of the boiling point, at least 50 Cc. should be dis- 
tilled from a flask with a capacity of 75 to 80 Cc, the mercury 
bulb of the thermometer being placed 1 Cm. below the exit tube. 
The flask is heated in an air bath, after placing in the liquid a 
few pieces of porcelain to prevent retardation of the boiling 
point. 

T"" 1 HE following is a comparison of some melting and boiling 

* points : 

German. U. S. A. 

Degree. Degree. 

Lard 36 to 46 38 to 40 

Acetic ether 74 to 77 72 to 77 

Ethyl chloride 12 to 12.5 12.51013 

Antipyrine notoii2 113 

Camphor 175 to 179 175 

Cocaine hydrochloride 183 189.9 

Caffeine 23410235 236.8 

Menthol _^ 43 

Paraldehyde 123 to 125 121 to 125 

Petrolatum 35 to 40 45 to 48 

Pilocarpine hydrochloride about 200 195-9 

It will be seen that in some instances there is a remarkable 
conformity in the data of both pharmacopoeias. 

THE introduction of a new edition of the pharmacopoeia in 

* Germany is usually coupled with fresh calls on the phar- 
macist's pocket in the way of purchasing new apparatus or 
making alterations of some kind. The new edition has been 
declared official from the 1st of January of the present year, 
but in the decrees now being issued by the various states, the 
pharmacist is permitted to use up his stock of preparations com- 
plying with the requirements of the former edition until Decem- 
ber 31, 191 1. As some changes in the nomenclature have been 
made, the necessary alterations on the labels of the stock bottles 
must be effected before the end of 1913. The use of sieves made 
of copper, bronze or brass wire is forbidden ; existing sieves of 
this description may, however, be used up to the end of 1915. 
Additions to his stock of apparatus consist in the purchase of a 
normal drop tube corresponding to the requirements established 
at the Brussels conference, which must be obtained at once. 



Further, an analytical balance must form part of his arma- 
mentarium. This, when bearing a weight of 100 Gm., should 
still distinctly permit the recognition of a weight of 0.001 Gm. 
Up to the present the pharmacist had to be provided with a 
microscope of 300 enlargement power ; now it is required to be 
of 350 linear enlargement power and to be provided with an 
ocular micrometer. The balance and the microscope must be 
procured by the end of the current year. ■ 

"J" HE new medicine tariff, according to which all charges for 
*■ prescription work have to be made, has again proved a 
disappointment. The eagerly expected general increase in the 
charges, following the upward tendency of expenses, has not 
been made, and the alterations in the prices for drugs merely 
reflect the actual position of the market. The new Pharmaco- 
poeia has had a curious effect in causing a slump in the prices 
of a number of official ointments. This is due to the fact that 
several ointments which were formerly prepared with paraffin 
ointment are now made with petrolatum. Paraffin ointment was 
a galenical preparation in itself ; there was, therefore, a special 
charge for making it alone, in addition to the charge for making 
another galenical — i. e.: the compound ointment. Now, however, 
the ointment is prepared directly with the base, hence the omis- 
sion of the preparation of the base as a distinct galenical. 



PHARMACISTS SHOULD RETAIN ORIGINAL PRE- 
SCRIPTIONS. 

WAS there ever a subject of such perennial interest as the 
question of the ownership of the prescription? They are 
fighting the battle over again in England, and for the physician 
it is represented that the prescription is analogous to a check — 
an order on a bank calling for the payment of a sum of money 
to the bearer of the check out of funds previously deposited 
by the writer of the check. The analogy is of course a false 
one. as was pointed out by one of the participants in the dis- 
cussion, who showed that a prescription was a formula given by 
a physician to his patient, who could have it compounded by any 
competent person he chose to employ. In contrast with a bank- 
er the dispensing pharmacist is an independent contractor who 
deals only with the holder of the prescription, a banking con- 
cern being merely the agent of the maker of the check. 

A TRUER analogue is a railroad or theatre ticket, which 
has no value in itself except for the fact that for a given 
occasion only it entitles the purchaser to a journey in the train 
or a seat at the play; and once used it is taken up and can- 
celled. When the physician issues a prescription and receives 
his fee, it is not the actual prescription any more than it is the 
actual railroad ticket that is paid for. The prescription is merely 
a ticket whose mission is fulfilled when the medicine ordered has 
been compounded, and it should then be taken up. It is retained 
by the pharmacist as evidence for his own protection in case of 
error. It is generally conceded by the legal profession, and by 
the medical profession as well, that the right of retention of the 
prescription belongs to the pharmacist. In some states, indeed, 
this right is recognized to the extent that it forms part of the 
legal statutes. 



Index page 36. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



27 



ANCIENT PROBLEM S IN M ODERN PHARMACY. 

Relations of Physicians and Pharmacists in the Middle Ages — Drug Adulteration in the Roman 

Empire — The Future Field for Pharmacists. 
BY JAMES J. WALSH, M.D., Ph.D., Litt.D . 

Dean and Professor of the History of Medicine and of Nervous Diseases at Fordham University School of Medi- 
cine, New York. 



WE are prone to think that the problem of the druggist, and 
of his relations to the physician and to the public, are com- 
paratively new. Never before, we think, were there so many drugs 
that required such large provision for their storage in readiness 
for sale. The evils of substitution and of the proprietary medi- 
cine and of nostrums of various kinds, and the danger from poi- 
sons, are problems of our day alone, so it seems to use. It is only 
with the complexity of the relations of physician and pharmacist 
that has developed in modern times that we would think 
there was necessity for regulation by strict laws of these relations. 
The apothecary as a store keeper — some one has called him a de- 
partment store keeper — would seem to be a new idea consequent 
upon the evolution of the large city and the development of busi- 
ness combination. I think, however, that I can show you that 
not a single one of these problems is new ; that some of them 
are very old, and that they have come up at many times in the 
history of medicine in so exactly the form in which they are be- 
fore us at the present time as to be amusing by their anticipa- 
tion of present problems. 

Nothing New Under the Sun. 

We are inclined to think that there surely must never have 
been a time when there were so many drugs prescribed as now. 
This idea seems very natural, since it would seem that drugs 
have been gradually accumulating, that we have all those of past 
generations as well as our own. The idea emphasized by the 
poet that we are "the heirs of all the ages in the foremost files 
of time" has given us a good deal of self complacency in recent 
years, but we must not forget that there are cycles of interest 
and of lack of interest in various subjects, and that over and 
over again supposed discoveries in medicine have been made and 
forgotten, and that not infrequently real discoveries have been 
made and used with great success for a time and then lost sight 
of. This is true in many other things besides medicine. There 
seems good reason to think that the Suez Canal, that is, the water 
way connecting the Red Sea with the Mediterranean Sea, was 
open in antiquity and allowed to fill in with sand during the early- 
part of the Christian era. America was probably visited a num- 
ber of times before Columbus landed on the island of San Sal- 
vador. Even the palaces of the Caesars at Rome were lost, hid- 
den beneath a pile of rubbish that accumulated above them until 
their very existence was quite forgotten. Indeed, the most inter- 
esting feature of human history is that men may do things great- 
ly and then forget about them. 

As for the Pharmacopoeia, the first medical documents that 
we have show us a wonderful development of pharmacy and 
pharmacists. In the Papyrus Ebers. written not later than 
about 1700 B. C, we have some accounts of the medicine of the 
Egyptians from four to five thousand years ago. (For a page 
from the Papyrus Ebers. see index page 41'.) They had alto- 
gether some 700 drugs which they thought were useful. At least 
they kept a record of them, and physicians were supposed to 
know something about them. I suppose that most of them were 
as little used as most of our hundreds of drugs are today. The 
druggist of the time, however, had to keep them, and it seems 
probable that at least in the temple pharmacies of those old days 
practically any of them might be obtained. It is indeed surpris- 

'An address delivered before the New York Hranch of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association on January 9, 1911. 



ing to see the extent to which drug giving had developed in that 
olden time. Dr. Carl von Klein, in reviewing the Papyrus Ebers 
some five years ago, enumerated the classes of drugs that were 
used in Egypt nearly two thousand years ago. You are familiar 
with them all and I hesitate to read them. They include all, of 
our nice long Greek names for classes of remedies, so I shall ven- 
ture to read most of them because of the startling fact that they 
should have anticipated so much of our modern pharmaceutical 
Hierapeutics. 

In this papyrus are mentioned over seven hundred different 
substances from the animal, vegetable and mineral kingdoms 
which act as stimulants, sedatives, motor excitants, motor de- 
pressants, narcotics, hypnotics, analgesics, anodynes, antispas- 
modics, mydriatics, myotics, expectorants, tonics, dentifrices, 
sialogogues, antisialics, refrigerants, emetics, antiemetics, carmi- 
natives, cathartics, purgatives, astringents, cholagogues, anthel- 
mintics, restoratives, haematics, alteratives, antipyretics, antiphlo- 
gistics, antiperiodics, diuretics, diluents, diaphoretics, sudorifics, 
anhydrotics, emmenagogues, oxytocics, echolics, galactagogues, 
irritants, escharotics, caustics, styptics, haemostatics, emollients, 
demulcents, protectives, antizymotics, disinfectants, deodorants, 
parasiticides, antidotes, and antagonists. 

Scarcely less "interesting than the variety of remedies were 
their methods of administration. 

Medicines are directed to be administered internally in the 
form of decoctions, infusions, injections, pills, tablets, troches, 
capsules, powders, potions, and inhalations ; and externally, as 
lotions, ointments, plasters, etc. They are to be eaten, drunk, 
masticated or swallowed, to be taken often once only — often for 
many days — and the time is occasionally designated — to be taken 
mornings, evenings, or at bedtime. Formulas to disguise bad 
tasting medicaments are also given. We have no advantage over 
the early Egyptians even in elegant prescribing. 

You will not be surprised after learning that this particular 
phase of our very modern pharmacy had presented itself in the 
oldest times we know anything of to find that other problems 
before the apothecary of modern time are not nearly so new as 
v e might be apt to think it, but simply represent a cycle of ac- 
tivities that have been noted many times before in the history of 
medicine. For instance, Friedlander. in the first volume of his 
"Roman Life and Manners Under the Early Empire" (English 
translation of the seventh enlarged and revised edition), describes 
the conditions that existed at Rome and the complaints that were 
made of these conditions, the efforts of physicians to prevent 
substitution, the evil of proprietary medicines, the neglect to fill 
prescriptions properly and all the other evils that we are so 
likely to think of as distinctly modern. Lest you might possi- 
bly think that I am coloring the situation at Rome so as to make 
what I have to say more effective I shall quote directly from 
Friedlander : 

In antiquity dealers in salves, drugs and groceries also sold 
medicines : the aromatarri were a guild at Rome ; there were, 
besides, travelling hucksters and swindlers. From such shops, 
Pliny the Elder complains, doctors often bought the remedies, 
instead of exercising their proper profession of making them. 
The ingredients they scarcely knew, and should they desire to 
make up written prescriptions would be cheated by the sales- 
men. Many doctors bought plasters and drugs ready made. 
Galen also groans at the frauds of these "cursed dealers," and 
says they, too, were innocent victims of the collectors of herbs, 
who brought saps and flowers and fruits and sprouts into the 



Index page 37. 



28 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



towns. But the ingenious imitations of these men would de- 
ceive the greatest experts. Galen, in his younger days, had 
been a pupil under a man who forged balsam, Lemnian earth, 
white flowers of zinc and other rare drugs to perfection, and 
earned largely thereby ; Galen, however, would not have his 
methods known, and fall into the hands of the unconscientious; 
he rather hoped to incite the young, by his writings, to inves- 
tigate and discover the working of the healing plants for them- 
selves. Any one who could have the command of all medica- 
ments, must understand what are the useful parts of plants, 
animals, minerals and metals, and be able to distinguish genu- 
ine examples and forgeries. 

But these important articles were seldom genuine, if merely 
imported : for security's sake they should be specially got from 
the proper regions through reliable friends, and, if possible, a 
life long supply. Galen made several journeys for this purpose, 
and annually received regular dispatches of such stuffs from 
many provinces, partly through friends, partly through the pro- 
vincial governors, from Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Cappadocia, 
Pontus, Macedonia, Gaul, Spain and Mauretania. He once went 
to.Lemnos to get Lemnian earth, and to Cyprus for her metals. 
In Cyprus his friendship with the imperial procurator of the 
mines at Soli enabled him to secure copper vitriol, copper vitriol 
water, cadmia, vitriolic ore, and white flowers of zinc, in quanti- 
ties sufficient, not only for life long practice, but for distribution. 
Litharge he discovered between Cyzicus and Pergamus. He 
could not discover the river Gagates in Lycia (whence came the 
jet), though he coasted all along Lycia. From the Dead Sea he 
fetched asphalt and certain porous black inflammable stones : he 
went to Palestine mainly to get balsam, which grew in an im- 
perial demesne at Engaddi in Judea, and was only sold by the fisc 
(the imperial treasury department). On his return he had the 
luck of meeting a train of camels bearing Indian aloe and lycium 
to Phoenicia, and of obtaining the latter pure, the impure ma- 
terial being unknown there. Many drugs had to be preserved 
in oil. But dealers sold not only the oil required, but swine-fat 
mixed with common oil, a very plausible composition ; and the 
commercial pure oil was usually not old and had not the requisite 
qualities. Galen got oil from his father who had kept it stored, 
and was ever renewing his supplies, which were thus perpetual, 
even should he live to be a centenarian. 

Pharmacy in the Middle Ages. 

We are very likely to think that once the Roman era of 
medicine, mainly influenced by Greek physicians, ended, there 
was nothing in pharmaceutics worth while talking about until 
comparatively recent times. It is only in the last few years that 
we have come to know more about the status of the medical 
profession and the standards of medical education during the 
Middle Ages. Every detail that we have learned has been a new 
source of surprise. Already in the twelfth century there was a 
law requiring a preliminary education for the study of medicine 
and four years' study of medicine itself before a physician was 
allowed to practise. About the middle of the thirteenth century 
there came a great development of this law requiring three years 
of study in the undergraduate department of the university and 
then four years of medical study in the university itself and a 
year of practice with a physician before a man was allowed to 
practise for himself. If he wished to devote himself to surgery, 
an extra year of the study of anatomy was required. The 
standard set is almost astounding. We are only just climbing 
up to that standard. During the nineteenth century we, here in 
America at least, were so far below it that it is scarcely worth 
while making the comparison. 

The Food and Drugs Act of the Thirteenth Century. 

This law for the regulation of the licensing of physicians 
and for maintaining the standards of medical education was de- 
creed by the Emperor Frederick II. While he was about it he 
made it refer also to the relations of physicians and druggists 
end to the maintenance of high standards in the preparation of 
drugs and the securing of pure and efficacious pharmaceutical 
materials. That portion of the law I shall read to you because 
it represents what is probably the first attempt at the legal regu- 
lation of the practice of pharmacy that we have. You will note 
that it forbids the physician to lend any money to the druggist, 
but also what may interest you more, prohibits his borrowing 
any money from the druggist, or owning an apothecary shop 
himself or an interest in one. Evidently there had been many 



ways of getting round the independence of relation between doc- 
tor and druggist which the public sentiment of that time seemed 
to think was necessary. Hence the phrasing of the clauses of 
the law on this subject. The confiscation of all his movable 
goods was a punishment that made this pure drug law likely to 
be kept. Probably the most striking feature of it, however, is 
the fact that the government inspector who allowed impure 
drugs to pass was considered worthy of death. The public had 
evidently had some experience of the officials' graft in matters of 
life and death in Italy even at the middle of the thirteenth cen- 
tury. The law, which was decreed in 1231 A. D., reads as fol- 
lows : 

In every province of our kingdom which is under our legal 
authority, we d^jree that two prudent and trustworthy men whose 
names must be sent to our court, shall be appointed and bound 
by formal oath, under whose inspection electuaries and syrups 
and other medicines be prepared according to law and be sold 
only after such inspection. In Salerno in particular we decree 
that this inspectorship shall be limited to those who have taken 
their degree as masters in physic. . . . 

Every physician given a license to practise must take an oath 
that he shall faithfully fulfill all the requirements of the law, and 
in addition that whenever it comes to his knowledge that any 
apothecary has fcr sale drugs that are of less than normal 
strength, that he shall report him to the court, and besides that 
he shall give his advice to the poor without asking for any com- 
pensation. A physician shall visit his patient at least twice a day 
and at the wish of his patient once also at night, and shall charge 
him, in case the visit does not require him to go out of the vil- 
lage or beyond the walls of the city, not more than one-halt 
tarrene in gold for each day's service. 1 From a patient whom 
he visits outside of the village or the wall of the town, he has a 
right to demand for a day's service not more than three tarrenes, 
to which may be added, however, his expenses, provided that he 
does not demand more than four tarrenes altogether. 

He (the regularly licensed physician) must not enter into 
any business relations with the apothecary nor must he take any 
of them under his protection nor incur any money obligations 
in their regard." Nor must any licensed physician keep an apoth- 
ecary's shop himself. Apothecaries must conduct their business 
with a certificate from a physician according to the regulations 
and on their own credit and responsibility, and they shall not be 
permitted to sell their products withovt having taken an oath that 
all their drugs have been prepared it! the prescribed form, with- 
out any fraud. The apothecary may derive the following profits 
from his sales : Such extracts and simples as he need not keep 
in stock for more than a year, before they may be employed, may 
be charged for at the rate of three tarrenes an ounce. 3 Other 
medicines, however, which in consequence of the special condi- 
tions required for their preparation or for any other reason, the 
apothecary has to have in stock for more than a year, he may 
charge for at the rate of six tarrenes an ounce. Stations for the 
preparation of medicines may not be located anywhere but only 
in certain communities in the kingdom as we prescribe below. 

We decree also that the growers of plants meant for medical 
purposes shall be bound by a solemn oath that they shall prepare 
their medicines conscientiously according to the rules of their art, 
and so far as it is humanly possible that they shall prepare them 
in the presence of the inspectors. Violations of this law shall 
be punished by the confiscation of their movable goods. If the 
inspectors, however, to whose fidelity to duty the keeping of the 
regulations is committed, should allow any fraud in the matters 
that are entrusted to them, they shall be condemned to punish- 
ment by death. 4 

The place which apothecaries occupied at this time in pub- 
lic estimation will probably be best appreciated from the fact 
that according to tradition Dante, the great Italian poet of 
the beginning of the fourteenth century, was a member of the 
guild of the apothecaries. In this guild were included the mer- 
chants whose trade required special skill, making it almost a 
profession, and also certain of the profe--ional men, as physicians,, 
architects and the like. Dante was himself an architect. As 
has been suggested, this guild of the apothecaries was a sort of 

l A tarrenus or tarrene in gold was equal to about thirty cents of our 
money. Money at that time had from ten to fifteen times the purchasing 
power that it has at the present time. An ordinary workman at this time 
in England received about four pence a day, which was just the price of a 
pair of shoes, while a fat goose could be bought for two and a half pence, 
a sheep for one shilling two pence, a fat hog for three shillings, and a 
stall-fed ox for 16 shillings (Act of Edward III. fixing prices). 

a Apparcntly many different ways of getting round this regulation had 
already been invented, and the idea of these expressions seems to be to I 
make it very clear in the law that any such business relationship, no mat- I 
ter what the excuse or the method of it, is forbidden. 

'Three and sixpence an ounce seems very dear, but this is the maxi- I 
mum. 

4 The first pure drug law. 



Index page 38. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



29 



university club in which most of the better class of citizens at 
Florence were joined. 

Origin of the Word Apothecary. 

The original definition of the word apothecary, from the Greek 
ttxofhjxq, means a storekeeper, that is, a man who sets things 
away until such time as people may need them. As a rule, only 
imported products require thus to be stored and the original 
storekeepers were sellers of wine. As a consequence the word 
for wine shop in many languages is derived from the same root 
as apothecary. The Spanish "bodega," the d being pronounced 
dh, is a typical example of this. The Italian "bottega" and the 
French "boutique" are reminders of the same derivation. The 
apothecary came, however, to sell not only foreign wines but 
perfumes and' dyes, and jewels and eastern products generally, 
including the drugs from the East. The modern evolution that 
has made the apothecary once more a storekeeper is not new 
then, but an atavistic reversion. 

The Three Balls of the Pawnbroker Originally Three Pills. 

The Medici, who were so important during the fourteenth 
and fifteenth centuries, seemed to have derived their name from 
their connection with medicine. Their coat of arms is six red 
balls on a field of gold, and this is sometimes said to have been 
derived from their pill making. They dealt in perfumes and 
spices and aromatic substances and drugs and balsams, as well 
as jewelry and fine stuffs of various kinds from the East, and as 
they needed to transfer large credits in the course of their busi- 
ness without actually sending cash, which was an extremely dan- 
gerous way, they were gradually drawn into banking. By bank- 
ing at first was meant the issuance of bills of exchange rather 
than the deposit and lending functions of a bank. After a time 
they came to lend money also, and became the great money lend- 
ers of the time. Our present sign for pawnbrokers, the three 
balls, is said to be derived from the coat of arms of the Medici. 
Evidently there was more money in banking than in drug selling 
and the Medici got out of the apothecary business. It is rather 
interesting to realize, however, that when the family first came 
to rule at Florence the head of the family held no office, though 
he was almost the absolute ruler of the Florentine republic. In 
order to be sure that the popular voice should always be felt in 
the government they had an election every sixty days. In spite 
of these elections the Medici maintained their influence over the 
•city and were what we would call the "bosses" of Florence. What 
fine grafting there must have been with elections every sixty 
days ! Occasionally there was some glorious muck raking. 
Whenever this stirred up the people, however, there were likely 
to be assassinations. They did not take these revelations so 
calmly as do our American people. I may add, however, that the 
Medici got out of the apothecary business completely before they 
■got into bossing, rotten politics and the rest. 

Regulating the Sale of Poisons. 

One of the interesting features of mediaeval drugdom, espe- 
cially at the end of the Middle Ages and what is known as the 
Renaissance, was the selling of poisons. Then came up a great 
fear of poisoning and the strictest kind of laws were made with 
regard to it. Druggists were forbidden to sell poisons except 
with very definite precautions. You will doubtless remember the 
passage in "Romeo and Juliet" in which Romeo, hearing of Juli- 
et's death in Padua, wants to procure poison in order to go back 
to Verona and die at Juliet's tomb. The druggist refuses to sell 
the poison, but is won over after a time, and especially 
when he learns that Romeo probably wants to put an end to 
himself, for the Paduan apothecary seems to have realized very 
well that dead men tell no tales, and that he would have a good 
reward to pocket for the poison. Laws regulating the sale of 
poisons have not always been as successful as legislators intend- 
ed, and even in our own day I understand occasionally the laws 
with regard to the sale of cocaine and morphine, not to mention 
anything more serious, are sometimes violated. 

There was a great deal of solicitude with regard to poisons 

Index 



during the Renaissance period, and a great many people acquired 
reputations as poisoners. Men were supposed to be able to find 
druggists, or at least men with enough knowledge of chemistry to 
supply them with poisons for their enemies. If we were to trust 
contemporary accounts these poisons were most wonderful sub- 
stances. Occasionally enough of them might be put on one side 
of the knife blade, so that a person might cut an apple or a peach 
with it, leaving the poison on one side sufficient to kill the per- 
son to whom it was given. Then there were poisons that were 
supposed to act slowly and bring about the gradual death of the 
patient, so that there would be no suspicion of poisoning, but 
just a lingering illness. Sometimes, of course, they were sup- 
posed to have their effect immediately, but such were only used 
by those who had not the opportunities for securing the more 
insidious poisons. There was a very general feeling that if one 
only knew enough about poisons one might easily compass the 
death of an enemy without any suspicion being aroused. A great 
many deaths were attributed to poison, and the lower classes par- 
ticularly spoke with bated breath of the evil of the rich and the 
nobility in this matter. 

The Poison Myths of the Renaissance. 
Personally I have always felt that most of this supposed won- 
derful knowledge of poisons was mythical. I think that we know 
just about what poisons the mediaeval people and those of the 
Renaissance possessed. Opium and henbane and arsenic were the 
principal among them, and aconite and a few others were less 
known. All of these are likely to produce symptoms in such a 
way as to lead to their betrayal. All of them have their effect al- 
most immediately. As for the insidious poisons tha*. caused 
lingering death, these are merely traditions credited because men 
like mysteries and are prone to think the worst of mankind. I 
am perfectly sure that a number of deaths attributed to poison 
at this time were really due to diseases that had not come to be 
recognized generally as yet. For instance, I should want to 
know w here to look for the appendicitis deaths at this time. Ful- 
minant cases of appendicitis look marvelously like poisoning. A 
man eats a hearty dinner, falls ill during the night, has a pain in 
his abdomen which gradually diffuses itself, and he dies in col- 
lapse in the course of twenty-four to forty-eight hours. If an 
autopsy is made it will be found that his abdominal cavity is full 
of a stinking fluid and that apparently there has been a ruplure 
of his intestines, with the exit of stercoraceous material. Ap- 
parently the poison was so strong that it ate its way through the 
intestines. 

There are many other affections besides appendicitis that 
might very well serve to masquerade as poison cases. Suppose, 
for instance, that the marriage of a young couple, if it were to 
be followed by issue, were to deprive some one of a great in- 
heritance. During the course of the early months of the marriage 
of the young couple the wife is suddenly taken ill with pain and 
then dies in the course of a few hours. Sometimes this sort 
of thing would occur just after she had been dining with the 
person to whose interest it was that there should be no heirs. 
As the result of the suddenness of the attack she might even die 
in his house. The doctors would not be able to say what she 
died of. A modern physician would think at once of the possi- 
bility of rupture of a tubal pregnancy. This condition was not 
recognized at that time. What a legend of poisoning could be 
founded on such a case. 

Henrietta Maria, the wife of the French Dauphin, died rather 
suddenly in Louis Fourteenth's time. There were many hints of 
her death being by poison. The symptoms pointed to some acute 
colicky condition shortly after eating, followed by intense pain 
and then by collapse and death in a few hours. The case has 
been very carefully studied, however, and is now known to have 
been one of ulcer of the stomach. There are probably many other 
such cases in history where poisoning is quite as unjustly sus- 
pected. Some of the slow running cases were examples of 
phthisis florida. It seems clear that Germanicus, whose death 
has been sometimes attributed to poison, died in this way. There 
are a number of cases in which trichiniasis caused death that 

ge 39- 



30 AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 

seemed to be due to poisoning. In one famous German case 
many of those invited to a political banquet were stricken by acute 
trichiniasis and died within a few days. It so happened that 
some of the worst cases occurred among the adherents of one 
particular political party and therefore there was the accusation 
of poisoning. I believe that some of those of the opposite party 
who had something to do with arranging for the dinner were 
actually put to death. 

Selling Innocuous Poisons. 

The interesting phase of these poisoning cases, so. called, for 
the pharmacist, however, is the reputation enjoyed by many of 
the secret poisoners of the Middle Ages. I am reasonably sure 
that they did not actually sell poisons, but that they handed over 
to those who applied to them various substances supposed to be 
highly poisonous, but which were quite inert. Occasionally 
after the administration of some of these materials a sudden 
death or a lingering death occurred, and then it was attributed 
to the poison. When nothing happened those who bought the 
poison could say nothing. It was just a question of working the 
public for all it was worth. The public dearly likes to be hum- 
bugged and it always finds some one to humbug it. 

Selling Inert Cure Alls. 

It was exactly the opposite condition to that which obtains in 
out time. We sell remedies for all the ills that flesh is heir to 
that are not only supposed to do them good but that actually do 
cure them, if we are to trust to those who are most interested in 
them — the sufferers. They take them and are sure that they are 
greatly improved. We know that as a rule these nostrums that 
they take are quite innocuous combinations of drugs not likely 
to do any particular good, and indeed, as a rule, their most pow- 
erful ingredient is a little bad whiskey. The people persuade 
themselves, however, that they are getting wonderful results and 
that these could come only from marvelous remedies. If some 
of the advertising pages of our newspapers should come under 
the eyes of an historian five hundred years from now he will see 
the testimonials and read the notices which show that we had 
wonderful cures for all sorts of disease. He will think that we 
were a very wonderful people and that we had a marvelous 
knowledge of drugs. It is just possible, however, that he may 
be led to the thought that it was not quite so much the remedies 
themselves as the effect produced on men's minds that was im- 
portant and that they are only an illustration of the tendency of 
people to want to be humbugged. These ideas, it seems to me, 
will help clear the mediaeval druggist of many of the aspersions 
on his character and show us that he was probably not a dabbler 
in poisons after all. 

The Abortifacient Myth. 

Perhaps the best illustration of a similar state of affairs that 
we have in the modern time is with regard to abortifacients. 
Druggists are supposed to sell a large number of preparations 
that produce abortion and there are many good people who are 
quite sure that they are accomplices before the fact in many of 
these cases. There is no doubt there are many preparations that 
people buy with the supposition that they will produce abortion. 
It is well understood by physicians, however, that we have no 
drug abortifacients. That is, we have no substances which will 
act directly on the uterus and cause it to empty itself. There 
are some materials that will so poison the mother that she is 
brought so close to death that the uterus gives up its contents. 
Oil of tansy, for instance, is one of these, but it is well known 
that women have taken as much as a spoonful of the drug with 
the production of a convulsive seizure and yet have carried their 
child to term. Just as the druggist of the Middle Ages will 
still continue to lie under the suspicion of having sold poisons, 
so does the modern druggist in this matter of abortion producing 
drugs. Physicians, however, do not attempt to use drugs at all 
when there is any question of emptying the uterus but employ 
other means. 

Index pi 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 

Help for the Present from a Study of the Past. 

These little excursions into the history of the problems fac- 
ing pharmacists at various times and of the abuses that crept in 
in one way or another are of course interesting in themselves, 
because they are so like our own, but they are valuable only in 
as far as they may help us in the solution of our problems and 
difficulties. History is only a story unless what happened in 
the past is somehow a lesson for the present. Whenever the 
professional idea lias lost significance and the idea of trade has 
invaded pharmacy the abuses have always been emphasized. 
Whenever druggists are professional men with a knowledge that 
enables them to occupy a special place with regard to human 
ills that only those with similar knowledge can occupy then the 
abuses are minimized and the spirit that reigns in pharmacy is 
thoroughly professional. The druggist who is a shopkeeper neg- 
lects the professional side of the work, tries to sell mainly the 
ready made so as to avoid trouble for himself and then the 
necessity for scientific knowledge diminishes and with it the pro- 
fessional spirit. These are the lessons of history, but they can 
he read very plainly in the conditions that have come into exist- 
ence in pharmacy and medicine during the last two or three dec- 
ades. 

The Shopkeeper Versur the Professional Pharmacist. 

Unfortunately the shopkeeper idea, what has been called the 
corner department store with a drug annex, has come to repre- 
sent for the public the pharmacy. Within the pharmacy pro- 
prietary, remedies of various kinds, just as in Galen's day, oc- 
cupy the shelves instead of the pharmaceutical preparations of 
various kinds which require special professional care in their 
preparation and compounding and for the purity of which and 
efficiency the physician depends on the pharmacist. The physi- 
cian has learned to avoid trouble just as the pharmacist does 
and writes his prescription for these proprietary remedies. Ten 
years ago, while a medical editor, I had the opportunity to col- 
lect the statistics of five drug stores- in five different parts of 
New York and found that more than two out of every three 
prescriptions contained some proprietary remedy of the actual 
composition of which the doctor could not be sure of and that 
this was true in the fashionable quarter of the city as in the 
poorer quarter. Indeed, there seems to be a greater tendency 
to use proprietary remedies among what are called the more 
intelligent people, because the new fangled, nice, long Latin and 
Greek names of these preparations read well on a prescription 
and were unfamiliar enough to impress patients. 

Out of these abuses we can only rise by restoring as far as 
possible to the chemist and pharmacist his professional standing. 
Besides being a dealer in pharmaceutical preparations he must 
Hterally be a chemist. The modern physician has not, as a rule, 
the time for the proper investigation of many chemical prob- 
lems that come before him in his regular practice. In the old 
days iie used to compound his medicines, but he has no time for 
that now. Just in the same way as he resigned his pharmaceu- 
tical functions with regard to the medicines to the pharmacist, 
so will he in the future turn over to him many of his chemical 
problems for solution. Urine and sputum examinations espe- 
cially in what regards the chemistry of them should quite nat- 
urally go to the chemist and pharmacist. The biological exam- 
ination of these same materials might very well be done by him 
also. The abuse of charity that is involved in asking the Board 
of Health to do examinations for patients who can well afford 
to pay for them should not be allowed to continue. In the same 
way milk examinations, bacteriological, as well as chemical, 
should be done by pharmacists. 

The Field of Professional Work for the Pharmacist. 

The pharmacist of the immediate future must be trained, as 
it seems to me, to be able to do these things with confidence, and 
so once more become the professional auxiliary of the physician 
that he was before the coming of the proprietary medicine and 
the exploited pharmaceutical preparation and the days of the de- 

<ge 40. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



31 



partment store with the drug annex. Such training, properly 
recognized by law, will restore to the druggist his professional 
standing, and bring into that profession only the most desirable 
individuals by a natural process of selection, excluding those 
whose tastes are only mercenary and who have no feeling for 
science and no interest in professional work. This, to my mind, 
represents the solution of an important problem in modern med- 
ical life and in the relation of medicine to the health of the com- 
munity. When every physician can practically have a trained 
laboratory assistant by sending specimens to be examined by his 
own druggist and talking over with him the findings, there will 
be much less haphazard diagnosis and much more wide diffusion 
of really scientific medicine. At the same time the laboratory 
will be put in its proper place. One of the serious complaints of 
present day medicine is that the laboratory has come to mean too 
much and careful knowledge of the individual patient too little. 
The laboratory must occupy a subsidiary place, and it has been 
very prone to assume that it was much more important than clin- 
ical observation, which is un- 
fortunate for the relations of s 
the laboratory and of scientific 
clinical medicine. As is al- 
ways true the raising of pro- 
fessional standards will benefit 
the patients quite as much as 
it does the professional men, 
and when this newer phase of 
the chemist and pharmacist 
shall have secured a foothold 
it will be easier to have legal 
regulations formulated in such 
a way as will prevent the com- 
mercialization of the pharma- 
ceutical profession, that has al- 1 
ready become too general. 



Das alteste 
1S90). 



Buch tiber Ileilkunde" (Berlin, Georg. Reimer. 



A PAGE FROM THE PAPY- 
RUS EBERS. 

The Papyrus Ebers, re- 
ferred to by Dr. Walsh on 
index page 37, has been 
reproduced by photography in 
facsimile, and published in two 
magnificent volumes by Wil- 
helm Engelmann, of Leipzig. 
The author of Chronicles of 
Pharmacy, A. C. Wooton. 
copies one of the pages < 1 47 ) . 
which is reproduced in fac- 
simile herewith. Mr. Wooton 
describes this page as follows : 

The first line of the page given is the end of the instructions 
for applying a mixture of powders rubbed down with date wine 
to wounds and skin diseases to heal them. That compound 
was made by the good Seb, the god of the earth, for the god 
Ra. Then follows a complicated prescription devised by the 
goddess Nut, the goddess of heaven, also for the god Ra, and 
like the last to apply to wounds. It prescribes brickdust, peb- 
ble soda, and sea-salt, to be boiled in oil with some groats and 
other vegetable matter. Isis next supplies a formula to relieve 
Ra of pains in the head. It contains opium, coriander, absinth, 
juniper berries and honey. This was to be applied to the head. 
Thre other formulas for pains in the head, the last for a pain 
on one side of the head (migraine) are given, and then there 
is a break in the manuscript, and afterwards some interesting 
instructions are given for the medicinal employment of the 
ricinus (degm) tree. The stems infused in water will make a 
lotion which will cure headache ; the berries chewed with beer 
will relieve constipation ; the berries crushed in oil will make a 
woman's hair grow ; and pressed into a salve will cure abscesses 
if applied every morning for ten days. The paragraph ends 
(but on the next page) as many of them do, with the curious 
idiom, "As it shall be a thousand times." The translation is 
given in full (in German) in Dr. Joachim's ''Papyros Ebers. 



THE ROLE OF DYESTUFFS IN MEDICINE.' 

By Herman A. Metz, 

New York. 

In taking up this subject at the present time our point of view 
is changed from that of some years ago. If we consider the 
number of dyestuffs, confining ourselves to those derived from 
or manufactured from coal tar, those used as remedial agents 
are very few, especially when compared with the great number 
employed in technical operations. 

The colors actually used or recommended, such as methyl 
violet or pyoktannin cceruleum, auramine or pyoktannin aureurr., 
scarlet B, methylene blue and later trypan red and trypan blue. 
These have been suggested as remedies for various diseases, and 
methylene blue has been dignified by a place in the Pharmacopoeia. 

It has also found a place in 
p r 0 p r i e tary medicines, as 
shown by the paper on methy- 
lene blue tests read by my 
friend Otto Raubenheimer be- 
fore the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association at Rich- 
mond. However, the sales do 
not indicate any wide or 
varied use of the products, 
and the dyestuff group would 
be of small importance to the 
medical world if this were its 
sole use. 

But when we leave the 
actual employment of dyestuffs 
as therapeutic agents and turn 
to the newer medical science, 
that of research and investi- 
gation, we find that dyestuffs 
have been most useful tools 
for the pioneers in this field, 
and this usefulness is largely 
based on their coioring power. 

The colorless products, no 
matter how energetic their 
action may be, it is almost 
impossible to determine the 
organism or parasite affected 
by them, but with the use of 
dyestuffs and coloring matters 
as reagents, it is possible to 
trace their affinities to the last 
degree. How important these 
are every biological student 




Reduced fac-simile of a page of the Papyrus Ebers. 

and separations 



identifications 
knows. 

Every one interested in medicine at the present time knows 
of and is following up one man, his methods and discoveries, 
but it is hardly possible to limit the field of interest in this way, 
as his name is constantly before the general public, Prof. Paul 
Ehrlich, the discoverer of the wonderful properties of dioxy- 
diamidoarsenobenzol, and when we read the story of his methods 
of research we find a most excellent account of the part that 
dyestuffs take in modern medical science. Professor Ehrlich 
has long been interested in the physiological effect of dyestuffs 
on the animal organism, and many years ago investigated and' 
determined the reactions and combinations of methylene blue 
with the animal tissues. During the succeeding years the use of 
aniline dyestuffs in colors as reagents for staining and identify- 
ing bacteria and other parasitic growths has had the result of 
opening a previously unknown and in some cases unthought of 
field to scientific and medical research. 



^ead at a regular meeting of the College of Pharmacy of the City of 
New York. January 17, 191 1. 



Index page 41. 



3 2 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



This is to be especially noted in the cases of diseases which, 
according to the present standpoint, are caused by the presence 
of parasites of the protozoan class. These are of most frequent 
occurrence in the tropics, and most of them we hear of from a 
distance,^ but many investigators have risked their lives in the 
study of these diseases, which include sleeping sickness and 
various diseases of animals, such as Texas fever, etc. So im- 
portant was this in its colonies that the German government sent 
Dr. Koch at the head of a commission to investigate them, and 
again we find the name "Ehrlich" in the foremost line of these 
investigations and coal tar colors used as the means, not only of 
identifying, but also of destroying the parasites whose presence 
in the blood was the cause and origin of the infection. These 
parasites are known as trypanosomes. After many experiments 
he found that certain colors of the benzidine group had a de- 
structive effect on the protozoa, and finally discovered a new 
product, the sodium salt of the tetrazo compound of benzidino- 
monosulphonic acid with diamidonaphthalenedisulpho acid, now 
known as trypan red, as the most effective agent for their 
destruction. 

While this color was successful in the treatment of certain 




HERMAN A. METZ, 
President of H. A. Metz & Co., importers of salvarsan. 
Former comptroller of the City of New York. 

forms of African fever, it had little effect on the parasite of the 
disease caused by the. tsetse fly, but other investigators found 
another product that is blue in color, the tetrazo compound of 
toluidine and amidonaphtholsulphonic acid, known as trypan blue, 
which is powerful enough to cause the complete removal of the 
parasite. All these colors are tetrazo compounds which stain 
animal tissue and also dye vegetable fibres. 

These experiments as yet had produced little that was of use 
in the treatment of sleeping sickness, and another investigator, 
Wendelstadt, discovered that another class of colors would affect 
the trypanosomes, although only temporarily. These are the 
dyestuffs derived from rosaniline. For sleeping sickness Pro- 
fessor Ehrlich took up this class of colors, and after many 
experiments found that para rosaniline was the most effective, 
and it is recommended as a remedy. 

In the course of these experiments it was found that some 
advantage was gained by combining what might be called the 
dyestuff treatment with that of atoxyl, which is sodium para- 
amidophenylarsenate. In the course of the investigation of the 
properties of the latter substance some interesting results were 
obtained ; but the after effects were not satisfactory, and Ehrlich 
started the production of new arsenical compounds, and the 



investigation of their effects. The number of experiments he 
made is now well known, and as two other gentlemen are to 
discuss the properties of the now famous "606," it will not be 
necessary to go into any description of it. But the coal tar dye- 
stuffs can certainly lay claim to being first assistants to the dis- 
covery of this amazing product. For laying bare the cause of 
the disease, and being in many cases strongly germicidal them- 
selves, they certainly may be said to have led the way to the 
discovery of what appears now to be their great first cousin, like 
themselves a coal tar product, paradioxymetadiamidoarsenobenzol, 
or salvarsan. 



The Keeping Qualities of Tincture of Iodine. 

Courtot (Jour, de Pharm. et Chim., II, p. 344, through Ap. 
Zt, No. 88, 1910) has pursued his investigations concerning the 
changes which time brings about in tincture of iodine. One 
solution of 85.7 Gm. of iodine in 1 liter of 95 percent, alcohol, 
which about corresponds to the tincture of the French Codex of 
1908 (10 Gm. of iodine in 90 Gm. of 95 percent, alcohol, or 88.4 
Gm. of iodine in 1,000 Cc. of 95 percent, alcohol) was examined 
every month for a year and compared with a solution made up 
after the formula of the Codex of 1884 (10 Gm. of iodine in 120 
Gm. of 90 percent, alcohol). Practically similar results were 
obtained in each instance. The changes occurred rapidly during 
the first month, then became more gradual and finally the solu- 
tion became stable after seven to nine months, depending upon 
-the -temperature at which it was kept. Light seemed to have no 
effect on the tincture. The preparation made after the formula 
of the 1908 Codex contained 85.725 Gm. of iodine at the time of 
its preparation, while nine months later it contained 70.802 Gm. 
of free iodine, 15.040 Gm. of hydriodic acid, 1.478 Gm. of acetic 
ether and 0.170 Gm. of a substance resembling an aldehyde (de- 
termined in terms of acetaldehyde). The solution correspond- 
ing to that of the 1884 Codex contained somewhat less hydriodic 
acid. The author had previously reported the remarkable sensi- 
tiveness of tincture of iodine to changes in temperature. It 
should be kept in hermetically sealed vessels and in a cool place. 
As the changes occur largely during the first month, tinctures are 
frequently used which contain more or less free hydriodic acid. 
Such a tincture will do no harm when applied to healthy skin, 
but is very irritating to suppurating mucous membranes and 
wounds when used as an antiseptic. Aqueous solutions of 8, 6 
or even 4 Gm. of hydriodic acid to the liter, quantities which 
are often far exceeded in old tinctures, will coagulate albumin 
and blanch muscle tissue. Reclus states that only fresh tinctures 
should be applied to wounds. "Tincture of iodine which is more 
than eight days old has lost its beneficial qualities and is in- 
jurious to the tissues." In order to prevent the deleterious 
changes Courtot advises the addition of sodium or potassium 
iodide, and concludes from his researches that 32 Gm. of the 
former or 35 Gm. of the latter will best answer the purpose. A 
tincture so made shows no traces of hydriodic acid after a year 
has elapsed. It is stable, nonirritating, and may be diluted with 
water for application to sensitive mucous membranes. 



The Removal of Paraffin and Petrolatum from jars or ves- 
sels is very difficult to accomplish with thoroughness. Traces 
of these greasy substances are very apt to remain even after 
cleansing with such a solvent as ether. Benedick (Physikal 
Zeitschr., 1910, vol. 15, III; through Schweizerisehe Wochenschr. 
fur Chem. u. Pharm., No. 33, 1910) suggests an ingenious 
method of washing such vessels in the condensed vapor of ethyl 
alcohol. A little ethyl alcohol placed in a beaker over a water 
bath, and the vessel to be cleansed is inverted over the beaker. 
The vapor condenses on the sides of the vessel, runs down and 
is immediately replaced by a fresh supply so that the glass is 
subjected to a constant stream of fresh alcohol, which very 
quickly carries off the last trace of grease. 



Index page 42. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



33 



Notes 



Queries 



Answers 



Massage Cream. — T. C. S., and others. — In response to 
numerous requests we reprint below the formulas for massage 
creams published in the American Druggist for March 14, 1909: 

Witch Hazel Cream. 

Stearic acid 5ii 

Sodium carbonate gr. xxiii 

Glycerin • gr. xxiii 

Hainamelis water 5iss 

Water, enough to make 3 i i i 

Melt the stearic acid on a water bath and add the sodium 
carbonate and glycerin ; add about two drachms of hot water, 
enough to dissolve the mixture, and continue the application of 
heat for an hour with constant stirring; then remove from the 
source of heat, add about one ounce of water, followed by the 
witch hazel water, stirring constantly the while. Heat the mix- 
ture for about a minute and stir until smooth, then transfer to a 
warm mortar and beat to a foam. The cream may be perfumed 
by the addition of a mixture of oil of ylang ylang, thirty drops ; 
helictropine, five grains, and oil of rose, five drops, dissolved in 
alcohol, one ounce. 

Massage Cream. 

Casein (precipitated from milk by magnesium 

sulphate and alum) jiii 

Boric acid 3v 

Cacao butter 5iiss 

Solution of carmine, N. F., enough to color. 
Oil of bitter almond, enough to perfume. 

Rub the solution of carmine well into the casein until the 
desired shade' is obtained; then add the boric acid. Incorporate 
the cacao butter, first melted, and finally add the perfume. 

To make the casein heat the milk to about 120 degrees F. 
For each pint of milk add one and one-half ounces of magnesium 
sulphate, dissolved in warm water (a saturated solution), and 
sec the combined solution aside for about an hour. Again heat 
to 130 degrees, or a little higher, and add 75 grains of alum 
dissolved in hot water, and if necessary continue the heat until 
the casein is entirely separated. Wash the precipitate in several 
waters and press dry. (We think the best results would be 
■obtained by the use of skimmed milk.) 

An alternative formula for a massage cream of the casein 
type is subjoined : 

Skimmed milk Oii 

Powdered alum 3vi 

Boric acid 5iv 

Borax 3vi 

Phenol (95 percent.) gtt. vi 

Oil of rose geranium. \ 
Oil of bitter almond.. {_ .. 
Solution of carmine... ( aa q ' s ' 

Water ' 

Heat the milk to 130 degrees F. Add the alum to 1 ounce 
■of water and heat to the same temperature. Add the boric acid 
and borax to 2.V2 ounces of water and apply the same degree of 
heat. Mix the milk and borax solution, while warm, and add 
the alum solution, also warm. After the milk has curdled, strain 
it, and if it is not then clear make more of the alum solution 
and add enough water to clear it. When all the casein has been 
gathered add the phenol and enough of the oils to impart an 
agreeable odor, and a little solution of carmine to impart the 
desired tint. 

The Dose of Chromium Sulphate. — A. C. was handed a 
prescription to be filled calling for pills, each pill to contain three 
grains of chromium sulphate as a dose, and he asks if he did 
right in dispensing it, as he considered the dose a dangerous one. 

The dose seems a large one, but when it is remembered that 

Index 



this salt of chromium is almost insoluble in the fluids of the 
stomach, the danger of fatal effects from absorption is lessened. 
The dose of the more soluble salts of chromium should not 
exceed one grain. 

Kings County Formula for Mist. Rhei et Sodae. — F. 

writes : "Can you inform me whether there is a Kings County 
Formulary, and if so, can you give us the formula for mist, rhei 
et sodse? 1 We have the New York and Brooklyn Formulary, but 
do not find the formula in question in it. If there is no Kings 
County Formulary what would you dispense on a prescription 
for mist, rhei et sodse? It occurred to us that the reference 
might be to King's Dispensatory, but we do not find any such 
formula there." 

It is likely that the mixture desired is the compound mixture 
of rhubarb of the National Formulary, the old Squibb's rhubarb 
mixture. The Kings County Pharmaceutical Society has been 
distributing manuals of the National Formulary to the physicians 
in your neighborhood, and this may account for the confusion in 
titles. 

Pleasant Emulsion of Codliver Oil.— T. C. K.— One of the 

most agreeable forms of emulsion of codliver oil is provided by 
the formula of the British Pharmaceutical Codex, reading as 
follows : 

Codliver oil 50.00 

Yolk of egg, by volume 6.50 

Tragacanth, in powder 0.25 

Elixir of saccharin 0.75 

Simple tincture of benzoin 0.75 

Spirit of chloroform 3.00 

Essential oil of bitter almond... 0.10 

Distilled water 100.00 

Triturate the tragacanth with a little of the codliver oil in a 
dry mortar; add the previously beaten yolk of egg and stir 
briskly, gradually adding 30 of distilled water as the mixture 
thickens. When of a suitable consistence, add the remainder of 
the oil and water alternately, with constant stirring, avoiding 
frothing. Transfer to a bottle capable of holding 125, add the 
elixir, tincture, spirit and oil of almond, previously mixed, shake 
well, and add distilled water, if necessary, to produce 100 by 
volume. 

Elixir of Saccharin. — T. C. K. — The elixir of saccharin 
of the British Pharmaceutical Conference has the following 
composition : 

Saccharin 5.00 

Sodium bicarbonate 3.00 

Alcohol 12.50 

Distilled watei, sufficient to produce 100.00 

Dissolve the saccharin and the sodium bicarbonate in 80 of 
distilled water, add the alcohol, filter and wash the filter with 
sufficient distilled water to produce 100. 

Etching on Glass. — P. J. McK. — Not long ago one of our 
English contemporaries published a note on the etching of glass 
in which a paste was directed to be made of ammonium fluoride, 
5iiss ; barium sulphate, 5iiss, and hydrofluoric acid sufficient to 
make a paste of a suitable consistence. The mixing should be 
done with a platinum or wooden spatula. The preparation is 
used both for writing on glass with a steel pen and for ordinary 
purposes of etching. 

While it is quite true that ammonium fluoride is a common 
ingredient of etching preparations, it is necessary that there 
should be free acid present, and this is often got by partially 
neutralizing the alkali, as for example, in the following: 

Strong hydrofluoric acid is partially neutralized by cautiously 

t>age 4.?- 



34 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



and gradually adding sodium carbonate in small crystals, the 
mixture being stirred all the time. The point at which the neu- 
tralization should cease is indicated by the mixture becoming suf- 
ficiently viscid to adhere to the stirring rod. This mixture, con- 
sisting of sodium fluoride and unneutralized hydrofluoric acid, 
is diluted with five to ten times its volume of water as required. 

There is a mixture on the market containing ammonium fluor- 
ide, hydrofluoric acid, and oxalic acid, thickened with barium sul- 
phate, but we do not know the quantities of the ingredients used. 
There are. many other similar mixtures in use, containing am- 
monium fluoride, but in all cases where this salt is used, free hy- 
drofluoric acid is present at the same time. 

Keratin Pill Coating. — Ms K. — Keratin is an article of 
commerce and may be purchased of any wholesale drug firm. It 
is a constituent of horn, bristles, feathers, etc., and is obtained 
from the same, according to Caspari (Treatise on Pharmacy), 
after removal of fat with ether, by . digestion, in the form of 
shavings or turnings with a mixture of pepsin, hydrochloric acid 
and water, for twenty-four or thirty-six hours ; this treatment 
removes all matter soluble in the gastric juice (pills coated with 
keratin being intended to pass through the stomach unaltered, to 
be dissolved in the alkaline secretions of the intestines). The 
residue, having been well washed with water, is digested with 
eight or ten times its weight of 5 percent, ammonia water in a 
loosely stoppered flask, at a moderate heat, until a nearly com- 
plete solution results, which is then filtered and evaporated to 
dryness. 

When used for coating pills keratin thus obtained may be dis- 
solved either in ammonia water and dilute alcohol, equal parts, 
or in acetic acid, the choice of solvent being dependent on the 
nature of the pill mass. The alkaline solution should be used 
for pills containing pancreatin, pepsin, alkalies, sulphides, etc.; 
while the acetic solution is best employed for pills of ferric 
chloride, metallic salts, tannin, arsenic, creosote, salicylic acid, 
and the salts of mercury, gold and silver. 

To make an ammoniacal solution of keratin for pill coating 
dissolve seven parts of keratin in a mixture of fifty parts of 60 
percent, alcohol. The acid solution is made by dissolving seven 
parts of keratin in 100 parts of glacial acetic acid, using heat in 
both cases, if necessary, to effect solution. 

Professor Caspari's directions for keratin coating pills are so 
explicit and readily understood that we give them verbatim : 
"All pills intended to be coated with keratin must be made with 
some fatty excipient and contain no appreciable moisture; the 
mass is best made with cacao butter and oil of sweet almond, or 
a mixture of purified mutton tallow or cacao butter, ten parts, 
and white or yellow wax, one part. After the pills have been 
rounded they should be dipped in melted cacao butter, which is 
allowed to harden ; they are then placed in a porcelain dish, the 
keratin solution added (about thirty or forty drops for 100 pills 
of medium size) and rotated until the pills have become thor- 
oughly moistened, after which they are dried on parchment paper, 
to which they will not adhere. The application of keratin solu- 
tion must be repeated three or four times and allowed to dry 
each time." 

Ointment Formula. — J. C. — See the formula for compound 
resorcm ointment of the National Formulary. 

The Quantitative Estimation of Alcohol in whiskey, beer, 
wine, etc., can be made by a very rapid and simple method de- 
vised by Kapeller and protected by a German patent. A given 
quantity of the fluid to be tested is added to some ether, the 
amount of the latter depending on the approximate alcohol value 
of the substance to be tested. After shaking the mixture sepa- 
rates into two layers, an aqueous layer and an alcohol-ether layer. 
If absolute alcohol is gradually added, the point is finally reached 
at which the separation into the two layers disappears. From 
the amount of alcohol required to accomplish this one reads, 
according to Kapcller's system, the percentage of alcohol or- 
iginally present in the fluid. 



The Removal of Caffeine from Coffee. — The preparation 
of the so called "caffeineless coffee" from which about ninety per- 
cent, of the alkaloid has been extracted is described by Wessel- 
hoeft in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (May 13, 
1909). In the preparation of this article the raw coffee beans 
are exposed in perforated drums to the action of superheated 
steam. This causes the hard cellular structure of the bean to 
swell and soften and the cell membrane of the individual cells to 
become penetrable to certain solvents of caffeine. These solvents 
are ether, benzol, chloroform and allied substances, which are 
guided through the drums after the softening process is com- 
pleted. About nine tenths of the alkaloid is removed in this way. 
Wesselhoeft states that together with the caffeine, the expulsion 
of certain waxy, resinous, and oily substances is effected to the 
advantage of the commercial and hygienic value of the bean, since 
it is owing to these that rancidness sets in when coffee is kept 
in store, causing general deterioration and a harsh flavor. After 
the extraction of the caffeine the beans are dried and roasted to 
the point of developing its empyreumatic qualities, The prepara- 
tion is largely used in Europe. 



Letters to the Editor. 



Possession of U. S. P. and N. F. Obligatory on New York 
Druggists. 

To the Editor: 

Sir, — Attention is called to the change of rules by the new 
State Board of Pharmacy and approved by the regents, whereby 
every pharmacist and druggist in the state of New York must 
possess a copy of the latest edition of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia and National Formulary. 

The rule of the old board required a copy of the U. S. P. 
or some other publication, embodying its text in full, to be kept. 
Rule 7 of the new State Board of Pharmacy reads as follows: 

"Every pharmacy and drug store shall own and have on file 
at all times the eighth decennial revision of the Pharmacopceia 
and the latest edition of the National Formulary, and no regis- 
tration certificate shall be issued for a pharmacy or drug store 
till this rule is complied with." 

It is, of course, advisable to have a Dispensatory as a refer- 
ence book in a well regulated pharmacy. 

As this rule is very likely to be enforced I earnestly advise 
your readers to supply themselves with copies of U. S. P.. VIII, 
and N. F., Ill, which books can be readily obtained through the 
wholesale drug trade. 

Otto Raubexheimer, Ph. G. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., January 14, 191 1. 



The Pennsylvania Labeling Requirement. 

To the Editor: 

Sir, — It would be interesting to know why the manufacturers 
refuse to designate their essence of pepsin as "Special" — that is, 
special by virtue of being weaker than the official essence of 
pepsin. Which of the following is the plainer statement of 
purity, quality and strength to the average purchaser? 



Tinct. nux vomica (special). 
Contains alcohol, 7.0%; strychnine, 0.1%. 



Tinct. nux vomica (special) — not official strength. 
Contains 7% alcohol = 6}% less than official. 
Contains 0.1% strychnine = 9/10% less than official. 

Yours for a label that not only tells the truth, but the whole 
truth and in such form as the most obtuse may understand. 

Louis Emanuel. 

Pittsburgh, Pa.. January 11. 191 r. 



Index page 44. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



35 



TALK OF BOOKS. 



Books that pharmacists are likely to be Interested In will be reviewed at occasional intervals in this department. 
Books so reviewed may be ordered direct from the publishers or through this journal. 



The History and Chemistry of the Essential Oils. 

In the eleven years which have elapsed since the publication 
of the first edition of Gildemeister and Hoffmann's "Die Aether- 
ischen Oele" great progress has been made both in the scientific 
study of the composition of the oils and in the technical details 
of their distillation and uses. It was therefore high time that a 
new edition of this valuable work made its appearance. In- 
deed, so great has been the development in some fields as to 
necessitate not only an expansion of the one volume into two, 
but also the exclusion, save for a brief review, of one of the 
subjects, namely, distillation. This particular chapter of the 
first edition was being worked out by Dr. C. von Rechenberg, 
who found the material so ample and the field so wide as to 
justify the preparation of a separate volume, which has been 
published by Schimmel & Co., under the title "Theory of the 
Extraction and Separation of Ethereal Oils by Distillation." 

The historical portion of the work was written by the late 
Dr. Friedrich Hoffmann, who was well known in the United 
States as the founder and editor of the Pharmaceutische 
Rundschau. The historical research involved in this portion of 
the work was done with that scholarly thoroughness which char- 
acterized everything done by Dr. Hoffmann. Even the most 
cursory examination of the list of authorities consulted shows a 
most unusual breadth of knowledge. 

Volume I of the new edition — the second has not yet been 
issued — opens with a general historical introduction occupying 
about 200 pages. This includes a history of essential oils in 
general, a history of the individual oils, and brief descriptions 
of the methods and apparatus used in distillation. This is fol- 
lowed by a chapter devoted to the extraction of perfume mate- 
rials through extraction, enfleurage and maceration. 

The third chapter of the volume is taken up with the study 
of the principal constituents of essential oils and of natural and 
artificial perfume materials. The volume closes with a chapter 
on the testing of essential oils. 

That portion of the present edition which has to do with the 
purely historical aspect of the subject required but little re- 
vision, the work of Dr. Hoffmann having been so carefully and 
so thoroughly executed. The other chapters, however, have re- 
quired complete rewriting, the author making acknowledgment 
to a number of collaborators in special fields. 

The work is intended to be of practical use for those engaged 
in the study and utilization of essential oils, and to that end a 
number of valuable tables are appended, separate reprints of 
which are included in the volume in a form available for labora- 
tor\ reference. 

The work is a very creditable one to author, collaborators 
and publishers alike. It was the generosity of the publishers 
that permitted such copious use of illustrations and the presen- 
tation of the book in a particularly pleasant format. Even to 
those whose interest in the essential oils is theoretical rather 
than practical the work will prove attractive, if for nothing else, 
the charmingly presented historical sketches which fill the first 
250 pages. The book is published by Schimmel & Co. at Miltitz, 
near Leipzig. 



Technical Formulas and Processes. 

For upward of twenty years the "Scientific American Cyclo- 
pedia of Receipts, Notes and Queries" has been held in deserved- 
ly high esteem as a storehouse of information concerning tech- 
nical formulas and processes. Those who, in the past, have had 



occasion to consult the book for formulas or processes, either of 
a scientific or technical nature, whether medical, dental or phar- 
maceutical, were seldom disappointed. With the march of prog- 
ress in all departments of science, arts and crafts, however, the 
need for altering old formulas or substituting new ones must 
have been increasingly felt; in other other words, a revised edi- 
tion of the book became necessary. Such a revision' was under- 
taken by Albert A. Hopkins, query editor of the Scientific Amer- 
ican. Instead, however, of attempting the drastic overhauling 
of the formulas and processes, which seemed compulsory, he 
essayed the task of recompiling and rewriting the entire book, 
work which required, as he tells us in the preface, the constant 
attention of a staff of experts and professional indexers for a 
period of two years. The result is before us in a handsome 
large octavo volume bearing the new title ''Scientific American 
Cyclopedia of Formulas," in which only a small percentage of 
the matter contained in the original Cyclopedia is retained, the 
new and added material being culled from the yearly accumula- 
tions of notes and queries published in the Scientific American 
and in the American and foreign drug and technical journals. 

The arrangement of the present volume differs from its 
predecessor in several particulars. Classes of materials have 
been divided into chapters and groups, and the classes follow 
each other alphabetically, a scheme which, taken in connection 
with an unusually complete index, makes the work convenient 
of reference, besides materially lessening the labor of finding a 
given formula or process. 

The opening chapter is chiefly remarkable for the fact that 
the entire twenty pages of matter contain only five formulas. 
The chapter has to do with Accidents and Emergencies, and in- 
structions are given for the treatment of asphyxiation, burns and 
scalds, dog bites, drowning, poison ivy, etc. An unusually com- 
prehensive and accurate list of poisons and antidotes figures in 
this chapter. In alphabetical order follow chapters on agricul- 
ture, including formulas for everything used about a farm, even 
to the testing of milk, veterinary remedies and the destruction 
of weeds. Of special interest to pharmacists will be the chap- 
ters on cements, pastes, glues and mucilages, ice cream, confec- 
tionery and chewing gum. toilet preparations and perfumes, writ- 
ing materials, and the unclassified formulas in the appendix. 
In the chapter on Chemical Manipulations, which brings the vol- 
ume to a close, a list of 800 substances is given, with the prices 
consumers may be expected to pay when the articles are pur- 
chased in ordinary lots. This chapter is illustrated with numer- 
ous line drawings which materially enhances its value. The new 
Cyclopedia is published by Munn & Co., New York, at $5. 

Notes on Commercial Oils. 

Oil : Animal, Vegetable, Essential and Mineral, by C. Ains- 
worth Mitchell (London: Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons. Ltd. Price, 
75c), is one of a series of volumes of uniform size, dealing 
with common commodities of commerce. Volumes already 
issued in addition to the one before us are: Coffee, by B. B. 
Keable ; Tea, by A. Ibbetson ; Cotton, by R. J. Peake, and Sugar, 
by C. Martineau, C. B. 

The present volume on oil is a most comprehensive yet suc- 
cinct account of the origin, methods of preparation, and uses of 
nearly all the oils known to and used by pharmacists, besides 
many with which he may be acquainted only through references 
in the literature. Among the curiosities listed under animal oils 
is chrysalis oil foil of silkworms'), obtained from the chrysalis 
waste in the silk producing districts of Japan, a yellowish red 



Index page 45, 



36 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



liquid with an unpleasant odor, which is used in the manufacture 
of soap. 

Sesame oil is classed among the semi-drying oils, and it is 
noted that the oil has a mild, bland taste and is used as a salad 
oil and in the manufacture of margarine. One of the constitu- 
ents of the oil, sesamol, gives a bright pink coloration with cer- 
tain reagents, and advantage of this is taken by the Belgian and 
German governments to detect the adulteration of butter with 
margarine, for it is prescribed in these countries that all mar- 
garine shall contain 10 percent, of sesame oil. Butter adulterated 
with margarine may therefore be readily detected by the applica- 
tion of the test for sesamol. 

The account of the growth of the petroleum industry in the 
United States is of pathetic interest in parts. The frenzied ex- 
citement following the discovery of oil wells led to the speedy 
exhaustion of some of the wells. In 1865 Pithole City, where 
oil had been discovered, had a population of 16,000. A year 
later, on the exhaustion of the oil wells, it was abandoned, and a 
few years later had completely disappeared, the district hav- 
ing once more been given over to agriculture. The author be- 
lieves that within a few generations the sources of oil in the 
United States will be exhausted and the world's supply will be 
mainly drawn from the undeveloped oil fields of Asia. 

The book, which is a small octavo of 128 pages, contains 
numerous illustrations of oil producing plants and trees, and ap- 
paratus, and we are glad to commend it heartily to the notice of 
pharmacists and others interested. 



A Manual of Practical Pharmacy. 

The Modern Pharmacist is a collection of articles, some- 
what modified, that originally appeared in N. A. R. D. Notes, by 
Otto E. Bruder, Ph. G. (Chicago: The National Association of 
Retail Druggists. Price, $2). It is a work sui generis, the vari- 
ous chapters having no continuous thread of connection ; it is 
characterized by numerous personal references and allusions such 
as are never found in textbooks. This was, of course, inevitable 
in a book made up of articles that had appeared serially in a 
weekly publication. That the book will prove helpful to a large 
class of pharmacists we have no doubt. Calculated to be of par- 
ticular service to those who employ aggressive methods in the 
conduct of business are the chapters on advertising and sales- 
manship. Numerous specimen advertisements are shown. The 
chapters on prescription pricing and drug store arithmetic should 
also be a source of value to owners of the book. 

The main object of this volume, as stated in the preface, "is 
to furnish a means to the pharmacist and his assistant of gaining 
practical knowledge to further the manufacture and use of the 
official drugs and preparations of the United States Pharmaco- 
poeia and National Formulary, and such other new and non- 
official drugs and preparations as are frequently prescribed by 
physicians." The direct form of address is used throughout, and 
this gives the discourse a familiar touch, which may or may not 
be relished by all. So far as the author's aim to familiarize phar- 
macists with the preparation and exhibition of nonproprietary 
articles is concerned, he has, we think, succeeded as well as any 
one could. 

We would wish that the author had not been so lavish in the 
use of capital letters. There may come a time when he will 
have real need of capitals and find himself bankrupted. 



Mahin Advertising Data Book. 

The eleventh edition of The Mahin Advertising Data Book 
(The Mahin Advertising Company, Chicago. Price, $2) comes 
to us replete with information concerning all kinds of advertis- 
ing—billboard, newspaper, magazine, etc. This is neatly tabu- 
lated and arranged for convenience of reference. In addition, 
particulars are given, regarding the composition, arrangement 
and setting of advertisements, proofreaders' marks, the use of 
color in advertising, selection of paper, etc. A synopsis of the 
laws governing copyrights, trademarks and patents furnishes the 
kind of information of which many pharmacists are in need. 



Of course there is included some advertising for the enterprising 
publishers of the book, but it is not obtrusive. Its value is en- 
hanced by the insertion of lithographed maps of the United 
States, the island possessions, Alaska and the Panama Canal 
Zone. 



Cosmetics and Toilet Preparations. 

"A Short Handbook of Cosmetics," by Dr. Max Joseph, of 
Berlin, which has been recently issued from the press of E. B. 
Treat & Co., New York, will perhaps be found useful by the 
family doctor in the treatment of the simpler affections of the 
skin and scalp, but pharmacists who may have occasion to refer 
to the work will wonder at the character of the formulas, which, 
in some instances, are antiquated, the preparations having long 
fallen into disuse, while others are marked by a certain misin- 
formation which is often amusing. The latter may, however, be 
due to faults of the translator. It may be necessary, perhaps, to 
inform physicians who use the book that oil of orange peel is 
''prepared by the distillation of .the rind of Citrus aurentium [sic] 
(sweet orange) with water," but notes of this kind, which are 
scattered through the pages, are not always so accurate as this. 
On page 11 we are told that "in the preparation of this oil [oil of 
rosemary] the leaves and juice of Rosmarinus officinalis are dis- 
tilled with water." The author seemingly cannot get far away 
from juices, for on page 20 a footnote tells us that oil of neroli 
is obtained ''by distilling the juice of Citrus aurantium with 
water !" Some of the recipes may prove suggestive for phar- 
macists in the formulation of different toilet preparations, though 
few can be said to be original. 



Words Interesting to Pharmacists. 

The letter T, says X-rayser in the Chemist and Druggist, 
has now been reached in the "'Oxford English Dictionary," 
and the first portion is unusually rich in words interesting to 
the pharmacist. Five of these are either Arabic in origin or 
have come to us through that language. Perhaps the most im- 
portant is tartar (argol), which with its numerous family 
'"jostles" (as the editor says) "through ten columns with the 
progeny of Tartary and Tartarus." Needless to say, the three 
groups are quite distinct in origin. Tartar, though we got it 
through Arabic, may be Egyptian ; its first appearance in Eng- 
lish is in Chaucer. The first quotation for tartaric acid is dated 
1810; up till then the forms tartarous and tartareous were in 
use. Taraxacum, originally Persian, however, also comes to 
us through Arabic; it means literally "bitter herb," and first 
occurs in a Latinized form as tarasacon in a manuscript of 1 189. 
Tarragon (Arum Dracunculus ) is Arabic, but reaches us 
through Byzantine Greek and mediaeval Latin in two forms, 
tragonia and tarchon, the first English quotation given being 
from Elyot (1538) : "Tragonia, an herbe now callid Taragon, 
late sene in this realme, whiche hath a tast like gynger." Tam- 
arind is Arabic tamr-hindi (date of India) ; and talc Arabic 
talq, but some authorities thing the latter originally Persian. 

All of the foregoing are of extreme interest as showing our 
indebtedness to Arabia for much of our knowledge. Tannic 
acid dates from 1834, when it was suggested by Pelouze as more 
suitable than tannin ; the latter first occurs in English, as tannin, 
in 1802. Tansy has an interesting but somewhat obscure his- 
tory. It is from tanesie (Old French), which is said to be 
from the Greek athanasia. immortality, a name which refers 
to the lasting nature of the flowers. Tanacetum is a Latinized 
form of tanesie. The article on tacamahac does not entirely 
settle the question of the identity of this resin with caranna. 
Several species of Bursera, Protium, and Calophvllum, as well 
as Populus Balsamifera, are referred to as its sources. The 
resin from the balsam poplar is distinguished from the others. 
Articles of much interest on tamarask, tar, and tarantula and 
its derivatives can only be barely mentioned ; one of the longest 
in the section is that on tea. The original pronunciation of this 
word (tay) occurs in poetry down to 1762, and still persists in 
Ireland and in some of our dialects. 



Index page 46. 



I 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



37 



ADVERTISING V BUSINESS v ACCOUNTING 



Subscribers are cordially invited to make inquiries of this department and to communicate information which they may 

possess regarding the subjects under discussion. 



MIDWINTER PUBLICITY. 

By Frank Farrington. 
Delhi, N. Y. 

HOT water bottles are selling strong nowadays and will con- 
tinue to do so for some little time. These goods respond 
to advertising better than a great many of the drug store lines. 

There are so many varieties of hot water bottles and so many 
qualities that it is easy to put on special sales of the goods 
without establishing any cut price basis that will spoil future 
prices. 

In view of the fact that there are so many good things to be 
said regarding hot water bottles to make people want them, it 
seems that much of the advertising of them is rather weak. 

For instance, the East Side Pharmacy Co. ad. fails to say 
anything more than "Hot Water Bags." The space is small, it 
is true, but there is room to say "A good one for a dollar," or 
"For $1.50 we sell one guaranteed for two years," or "Prices 



HOT WATER BAGS 

The celebrated "Kantleek" line, also 
cheaper grades. 



EAST SIDE PHARMACY CO. 

CHAS. H. DAVIS 
30 State St. Cor. Harlow 



run from 75c. to $3." Any space that is large enough to contain 
an advertisement is large enough to use to say something worth 
while. 

Don't Use Blind Headings. 

The American Drug Store, Traverse City, Michigan, plays 
up the guarantee strongly but fails to give any prices. A head- 
ing on that ad. of "Guaranteed Water Bottles" would be more 

Guaranteed 
Two Years 

When a dealer will stand behind an 
article fully for two years there must 
be quality and service in that article. 
We sell a lot of good rubber goods 
of this kind. We have been doing it 
for six years past. It i 1 - the kind we 
like to sell, for "The Recollection of 
Quality Remains Long After the Price 
Has Been Forgotten." 

We are showing in our window a 
large line of this quality rubber goods, 
and we can supply your needs in the 
rubber line with satisfactory articles. 
Take a good look at our window. You 
will really find it interesting. 

AMERICAN DRUG 
STORE 

apt to attract buyers than the anomalous head that is used. 
The heading of the advertisement is important and the differ- 
ence between good and bad headings is often the difference 
between good and bad ads. 

The Personal Element. 
The Bristol Drug Company have injected into their ad. a per- 
sonal element that will make it appeal to every woman who 

Index 



gets sight of the heading. Few are the housekeepers who are 
not now and then troubled with ants in the pantry, and when the 
advertisement tells how an actual woman got rid of ants it ap- 
peals to them far more strongly than an abstract statement of 



How a Clever Woman 
Rid Her Pantry 
of Ants 

I simply spread Watson's Ant Sugar 
around where the ants bothered me. 
For instance, they always in former 
years got into my sugar box. I stood 
that right on the floor of the cupboard 
on a newspaper and sprinkled the Ant 
}ngar around the edge of the paper and 
there hasn't an ant been near it, and 
that is the first time in six years that 
I have been able to keep my sugar 111 
the pantry during the summer. 

Then I sprinkled it thick on the win- 
dow sill where I think they came in. 
I haven't seen one since. Why don't 
you try a box? 

25c ONLY 
Manufactured by 

The BRISTOL DRUG CO, 

ANSONIA, CONN. 



the druggist. This kind of advertising may well be studied by 
the druggists in smaller towns, those who are obliged to use 
comparatively small space. 

A Good Ad. on a Difficult Subject. 

And speaking of headings the South End Pharmacy have 
a good heading on a good ad. When it comes to advertising 
the mere fact that you are running a good drug store, it is 
pretty difficult to get your advertisements read. This ad. will 
be read and it makes a good point, confining itself to a simple 
statement. It might have taken up three times the space and 
elaborated indefinitely upon what a good drug store is and how 



0! You People of the 
South End! 

Remember there's a first-class drug 
store at your door. Prescription men 
in charge. 

South End 
Pharmacy 

431 S. TEJON STREET 
Phone 875 



it should be run, going deep into the ethics of the thing, and 
when the few people who would have read it had finished they 
would have known no more about it than when they began. 

We reproduce the inside pages of a good little four-page 
folder on spices, issued by Moser & Weltner, of Uniontowri, 
Pa. There is some money in spices when the druggist adver- 
tises them and develops a business, especially if he can get the 
prices that this firm gets. As a rule, the drug store must sell 
these goods on a pretty narrow margin in order not to be so 
high above the grocers that people will not pay the difference. 

ge 47- 



38 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



The first page of this folder reads, "Every careful housekeeper 
should find out more about our rich, pungent spices." 



DELICIOUS FLAVORS IN YOUR COOKING 



OF COURSE You take great 
pride in your cooking, and OF 
COURSE you want it to have such 
delicious flavors that all of it will 
be keenly relished to the very last 
morsel. Let us give you a good 
tip. 

Whether your cooking is "tasty" 
01 "tasteless" depends almost en- 
tirely upon the spices you use. 
Therefore, a little extra care in 
buying your spices will have much 
to do with the popularity of your 
cooking. 

It stands to reason that we will 
be able to supply you all your spices 
as soon as you find out that we can 
furnish you with BETTER spices 
than you are now using and charge 
you NO MORE than you are now 
paying for spices. This is precisely 
what we can do. 



FROM OUR experience in buying 
and Handling drugs, we know that 
Gilpin, Langdon &• Co. market the 
highest grade ground drugs. As 
they are also extensive millers of 
spices, we naturally went to them 
for our spices, expecting to get the 
finest grades of spices that come to 
America. We have more than real- 
ized these expectations. 

Finest Spices Grown — fresh and 
pungent — yes, we offer you the very 
finest snices grown, offer them fresh 
and clean and possessed of every 
iota of their deliciousness and pun- 
gency of flavor. These are the 
spiciest, richest, the strongest and 
most tasty spices the wholesale mar- 
ket affords, and they will do more 
than will anything else to make all 
your cooking successful. 

Because we deal directly with Gil- 
pin, Langdon & Co., we secure 
these spices at rock-bottom prices 
and are able to offer them to you 
at prices as low as you are now 
paying for ordinary spices. 



NOW TURN TO PRICES LIST ON LAST PAGE 

Pages z and 3 of a good spice circular. 

The ad. of the Montana Drug Company is a good form of 
special sale ad. for the drug store that uses single column space. 
This is the kind of advertising that most drug stores have to 



Whisk Brooms 
Cloth Brushes 

We have just received an extra large 
consignment of whisk brooms from one 
of the largest manufacturers in the 
country. For a few days we propose 
to eliminate profits, and about half 
price or less will predominate this sale. 

Whisk Brooms 

Which sell regularly for 25c to 75c will 
be moved at 

15c to 35c 

Cloth Brushes 

All of the brushes are of extra su- 
perior quality. Made of the finest hair 
and other materials used in brush con- 
struction. These brushes sell usually 
at 50c to $5 each and the range of re- 
ductions will put them out at 

50c to $3.00 

Montana Drug Co. 

The Big Busy Store 
69-73 WEST PARK STREET 



do, for most of us are users of small space in country news- 
papers. Our special sales are along the line of this one and 
require some such treatment. 

A good prescription tag evidently intended to be torn in 
two and one part given to the customer who is to call for the 
medicine while the larger piece is retained and fastened to the 
bottle comes from Joseph R. Cotterrel, of Oakmont, Pa. The 
form used should be successful in fixing the responsibility on the 
customer regarding the character of the payment. Tags like 
this or of other forms are inexpensive and very desirable for 
making mistakes less frequent in handling the business end of 
prescription work. It is just as important that the right man 
get the right prescription as that the prescription itself is cor- 
rectly compounded. It is also important that the prescription 



be wrapped and delivered in such shape that its appearance will 
impress the customer favorably. The customer, as a rule, must 

judge the prescription by its external appearance, and he judges 
the store by the prescription. A little red tape along this line 



M. 



CHARGE. 



PAID. 



COLLECT. 



JOS. R. COTTERREL, Ph. G. 

Oakmuiit, Pa. 



DRUGGIST, 

Cor. B Street and Oaktnont Avenue. 



M. 



Charge. 

Paid, 

Colled, 



will help give a good impression to the public even when it is of 
no value as a real protection. 



Making Money from Incoming Calls. 

We commented in an earlier issue on the plan pursued by Dr. 
W. C. Alpers, of New York, in handling incoming telephone 
messages. Below we reproduce from the Apotheker Zeitung 
a printed blank on which the notice of call is sent: 

Telephone Message 

from the Pharmacy 

You are requested to come to tele- 
phone where a friend wishes 

to speak to you. 

Please call up 

at o'clock. 

This notice, properly filled out, is enclosed in a sealed en- 
velope on the outside of which is printed the following: 

Telephone Message 

from the Pharmacy. 

A charge of 5 cents is made for de- 
livering this message. 

On receipt of the envelope the person called pays the charge 
without demurring, as a rule. The fact that the notice of 
charge is printed makes it definite and final. 



Pegasus in the Pharmacy. 

Poetry oozes out of Emil Roller "like otter of roses does out 
of the otter," as Mark Twain said. Even his advertisements take 
poetical form as witness the following lyric which he encloses in 
packages sent out to customers ; 

A HINT TO HEALTH. 

Hark, our Stomach, Liver Pills, 

Highly recommended! 
Will relieve all minor ills 

In proper time attended. 

They restore your appetite, 

Liberate bad gases. 
And make life a real delight. 

A joy in all its phases. 

You won't have to hang around 

Without spunk, ambitions; 
You'll feel active, safe and sound, 

Alert in all conditions. 

Nausea, Headaches, Dizziness 

Disappear like wonder; 
Biliousness and Pains, Distress 

Will also have to wander. 

And all troubles, and all ills, 

Caused by Indigestion, 
You can right by Roller's Pills 

Quite surely, without question 

They are to our best relief - 

Just the medication 
When you look for help, relief 

In Chronic Constipation. 

Therefore give them a fair trial 

Without hesitation; 
Buy of Roller's Pill a vial 

And you'll obtain salvation. 

Emil Roller. 

25-. A BOTTLE. 



Index page 48. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



39 




Some oF Liquid 



(CONTENTS OF THE NEW PACKAGE) 



NOW ON SALE AT ALL 
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 



4 o 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



€6 



I0EJE 



][ 



EIMER & AMEND, 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS. 



Scales, Weights, Horn Goods, Filter Paper. 




PHARMACEUTICAL APPARATUS. 

A Full Line of Goods used in the 
Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 

CHEMICALS, C. P. AND TECHNICAL 



Chemical and Bacteriological Apparatus 



205-211 Third Avenue, Cor. 18th Street, NEW YORK. 
P)=ii ir==i r= 



DHHC 



THE HANDSOMEST PACKAGES OF 



Talcum Powder 

VIOLET No. 17 ROSE No. 20 

10, 15 and 25c Sellers. 
2% oz. round, 4 oz. oval, 8 oz. dome top, 1 lb. canisters. 
Soft, white, velvety powder nicely perfumed. 
Your name on label advertising yourself. 
Pricei to make you 100% profit. 
Send for sample. 



HENRY K. WAMPOLE & COMPANY, Inc. 

Manufacturing Pharmacists Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when -writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



4i 



Alphabetical Index to Advertisers 



Page. 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co 73 

Albany Chemical Co 1 

Albany College of Pharmacy — 

All.ertype Co 60 

Allaire, Woodward & Co 2 

Allegrettl Chocolate Cream Co... 65 

Allen Stafford & Sons, Ltd — 

American Can Co — 

American Druggists Fire Ins. Co. .1 

American Bank Note Co 2 

American News Co 6 

American Stopper Co — 

Ammonol Chemical Co 60 

Anglo-American Drug Co 15 

Antikamnia Chemical Co 21 

Antiphlogistine — 

Aral & Briesen — 

Armstrong Cork Co 02 

Athanassiade's Sons, J. E 2 



Where numbers are omitted, the advertisement appears In alternate Issues 
For Classified Index and Buyer*' Guide See Pages 8 and 9. 

Page. Page. 

Ingraham Co.. F. F — 

International Vending Co 70 



Bauer Chemical Co 65 

Bauer, Justus, & Son 64 

Becker Co., L. A 5 

Becton, Dickinson & Co 1 

Borden's Condensed Milk Co — 

Bouton Co., Inc., J 73 

Breitenbach, M. J., Co 18 

Bristol-Myers Co 21-71 

Brooklyn College of Pharmacy... — 

Buffalo College of Pharmacy — 

Burnbam, Royal E 66 

Burnham, E 73 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co 9 

California Fig Syrup Co 15 

Carpenter Chem. Co — 

Centaur Co 59 

Chattanooga Medicine Co 2 

Colton Co., Arthur — 

Common Sense Mfg. Co 72 

Crittenton, Chas., & Co — 

Cudahy Packing Co — 



Co. ... — 

S 

71 



Davids Co., Thaddeus .. 
Denver Chemical Co. . . 
Detroit Show Case Co. 
Detroit & Cleveland Nav 

Ditman A. J 

Doane Chas. R 

Dougherty, A — 

Doering & Son, C 72 

Drevet Mfg. Co — 

Druggists Indemnity Exchange . . — 

Eclipse Toothache Gum Co 74 

Elmer & Amend 40 

Etna Chemical Co 64 



Fairchild Bros. & Foster . . 
Farbenfabrlken of Elberfeld 
Fellows Medical Mfg. Co. . . 

Fenimore & Co 

Fries Bros 

Fritsche Bros 



Co. 



Gedney, J. W 

General Drug Co 

Grand Rapids Show Case Co. 

Graham, Gervaise 

Green & Sons, Robert M. ... 



10 



Hall & Ruckel 39 

Hansen's, Chr 74 

Hawaiian Pineapple Products Co., 

Ltd 69 

Hearn, Jas. A — 

Hinton Chem. Co 74 

Hoffman, Geo. W 74 

Hoffman-LaRoche 42 

Hohner, M — 

Horlick's Malted Milk Co 66 

Hudson & Co 75 

Hughes, Henry L 62 

Huyler's Chocolate — 

Hydros Chemical Co 67 

Hygeia Nursing Bottle Co 4 



Kxlst, F. V 

Kress & Owens 

Kropp, E. C, & Co. 



Laboratories of Applied Physi- 
ology of France — 

Lambert Pharmacal Co 1 

Lehn & Fink — 

Lenox Hotel 68 

Leonard. Theo 71 

Lilly, Eli & Co — 

Liebig's Extract of Meat Co., Ltd. — 

Lkiuid Carbonic Co 11-12-13-14 



S. E. . 
& Son 



Co. 



6* 



Loelter & Co., H. G. 
Loreley Duplex Mfg. 



Co. 



Major Mfg. Co 21 

Mallinckrodt Chem. Works 1 

Marvel Co 61 

Mass. College of Pharmacy . . . . — 

McAvoy Brewing Co 1 

McVey, J. J 16 

Mellin's Food Co 63 

Merck & Co 59 

Merz Capsule Co — 

Miles Medical Co — 

Mosteller Mfg. Co 17 

Mott Label Co., W. A — 

Mt. Washington Box Co 16 

Mulford, H. K., Co — 

Munyon's Homoeopathic Home 

Remedy Co 22 

Nathan Novelty Co 74 

Natl. Cash Register Co — 

Natl. Color Type — 

Natl. Licorice Co 59 

New England Collapsible Tube Co. 21 
New England Confectionery Co... — 

New Skin Co 18 

N. Y. Quinine & Chemical W'ks. 
Ltd 76 



Pabst Brewing Co — 

Pape, Thompson & Pape Co — 

Parke, Davis & Co 57 

Pasteur Vaccine Co — 

Philadelphia Colloge of Pharmacy. 71 

Pinex Co 20 

Planten, H., Son 02 

Powers - Weightman - Rosengarten 

Co — 

Prentiss Clock Improvement Co.. — 



Page 

Ray Mfg. Co., 
Read, E. B., 

Redncine Co — 

Reslnol Chemical Co 7 

Revell, A. H., & Co 21 

Rochester Show Case Works .... — 

Rotary Sign Co — 

Royal Specialty Co 6S 

Russia Cement Co — 

Sobering & Glatz 18 

.Schieffelln & Co 3 

Scott & Bowne — 

Segtr & Gross Co 16 

Sen-Sen Chiclet Co 42 

Sharp & Dohme 41 

Sheffield Dentriflce Co 72 

Sheffield File Co — 

Sheip, Henry H., & Co — 

Shinn & Kirk 67 

Simmons Hardware Co — 

Smith Co., J. Hungerford — 

Smith, F. A 66 

Smith, Kline & French — 

Smith, Martin H., Co 8 

Stafford Miller Co — 

Stearns, Fred'k 7 

Strong, F. H., Co — 

Swanson Rheumatic Cure Co. . . . 1 
Sylvester's Haarlem Oil 16 

"Tanglefeet" 74 

Thermoton Co., The 
Torsion Balance Co. 



76 



United Medical Co 

University of Illinois 

University of New Jersey 

Ungerer & Co 

Upjohn Co 



40 



Wampole & Co., Henry K. 

Waterman Pen Co. — 

WANTS 74 

Webb & Sons, Jas 1 

Weissfeld Brothers 7 

Wells & Richardson Co — - 

Whitall Tatum Co 17 

Wirz, A. H 20 

Wolmark Chemical Co 7 

Wyeth, Jno., & Bro 15 

Young, W. F 70 



Paraform Throat Lozenges S & D 





A n t i s e p t i c — D emulcen t — H e a 1 i n g 

In 40's . . .$2.00 per doz. 
In lbs 1 .co per lb. 



Much Better in Quantity 

Your Doctors are Being Sampled 

Sharp & Dohme 



TU A Paraformaldehyde 1-4 gr. 

x 11C Boric Acid i gr. Chicago 

Formula Menthol 1-40 gr. ^" IC T a «o 

formula Demulcent Base q. a. St. Louis 



BALTIMORE 
Philadelphia 
New York 



Atlanta 
New Orleans 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when uriting to Advertisers. 



42 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



A Cough Syrup Worth Selling 

Syrup Thiocol Roche 

Contains no morphine or other derivative of 
opium; no chloroform, no habit-forming or 
constipating ingredients of any sort; nothing 
to upset the stomach or dull the appetite. 

A highly scientific product, transcending other cough 
and cold remedies, therapeutically and mechanically 

In 6-ounce bottles. $7.00 per dozen. Better price in ^-gross lots. 

Put it in stock now. It is advertised 
widely to physicians. 

"I have given it freely in infancy and in old age. In the cold, wet weather, from 
January to April, I treated many cases of subacute tracheitis and bronchitis, existing 
from several weeks to three or four months. Under the use of small doses of Syrup 
Thiocol Roche, every case recovered in a remarkably short period of time." Dr. — , 
Providence, R. I. 

THE HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE CHEMICAL WORKS 
65 Fulton Street, New York 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. PORTLAND, MAINE ROCHESTER, N. V. SALEM.OHIO ROCHESTER, N. V. TORONTO, CAN. LONDON, CAN. 

frank H. Fleer a C«. factory Corll> 8 Son Co. Factory T. 6 Ounn Co. Factory th« Orovc Co. Factory After Olivier Oum Co. Fleer Factory Sooienlllo Factory 

SEN- SEN CHICLET COMPANY 

METROPOLITAN TOWER.NEW YORK. 



Sen-Sen 

The Breath Perfume 

sold in every part 
of the civilized 

WORLD 



IT HAS NO COMPETITION 



$jtckfs 

* REALLY DELIGHTFUL 

(STandy (floated 
deeming CSum 

FOR SALE BY ALL THE 
BETTER KIND OF TRADE 



Sen-Sen 

CHEWING GUM 

MADE IN ALL FLAVORS 

THE HANDSOMEST PACKAGE 
THE BEST QUALITY 

A) 

Like a breath of Springtime' 



Branch Olfieos and Warehouses: BOSTON.Mats, CHICAGO. III. SAN rRflNCISCO.Cal. WINNIPEC. Man. MONTREAL, Que. LONDON. Cog 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



43 



TtiH HOTEL ASTOR PHARMACY. 



Something New in Metropolitan Drugdom— A Drug Store With- 
out a Smell— Roses and Roborants— Lithontriptics and Lilies 
— Ethics and Elegance Combined. 



An ethical drug store in which there is no iodoform, asa- 
fcctida, valerianates or other odoriferous drugs, without a soda 
fountain, without a counter, without a sign, with no cigar case, 
with no visible stock of proprietary or patent remedies, which 
does not open on the street, and with a show case filled with 
beautiful cut flowers, is 
somewhat out of the 
common. The dainty 
Hotel Astor pharmacy 
of F. K. James, which 
was opened to the New 
York public in Decem- 
ber, is all this and more. 

The space allotted to 
the store is a portion of 
the old Pompeiian room, 
measuring eighteen by 
thirty-five feet, facing 
on the south corridor of 
the Hotel Astor and 
opposite the Orangerie. 
As will be seen in the 
illustrations, the ceiling 
is lofty and the Pom- 
peiian decorations still 
show in the frieze above 
the fixtures. 

To the left on enter- 
ing are wall cases of 
solid mahogany, nine 
feet high, filled with 
cosmetics, p e r f u mery 
and toilet specialties. 
Surmounting the pillar^ 
of the fixtures are heavy 
gold plated capitals with 
a spray and leaf, in the 
style of the Empire. A 
griffin in old brass above 
«ach case supports an 
ornamental lantern. The 
backs of the cases are 
of plate glass mirror, 
while the shelving 
throughout the store is 
made of heavy polished plate glass. All the cases have frame- 
less, sliding plate glass doors, the glass itself moving to and fro 
■easily and noiselessly over rollers, and closing against felt pads, 
making the cases practically dust proof. At the southern end 
of these cases a door of leaded art glass panels gives access 
to the prescription department. 

The Prescription Department. 

The prescription department is cut off from the rest of the 
store by the display case, which runs across the southern end. 
The dispensing counter is simple and unpretentious, but fitted 
with every facility for quick dispensing. The mercury coat- 
ing is removed from the back of the mirror facing the dis- 
penser for a strip two inches wide, enabling him to keep his 
eye on the store while at the dispensing counter. 

The chemicals and galenicals for dispensing are contained in 
glass labeled stock bottles of one and two "ounce sizes, so that 
in a vary small space it is possible to keep a great variety of 
preparations. In the interest of safety the poisons are kept in 
a separate closet with wooden doors, also facing the dispensary. 




INTERIOR OF JAMES PHARMACY. HOTEL ASTOR. 
Buffet type wall cases on east side, showing sundries and toilet articles. 



kind to 
Index page 49. 



Behind the dispenser and between the dispensing desk and the 
broad window to the south, which furnishes light during the 
day, is a series of double cases running at right angles to the 
window and provided with glass doors. In these are kept the 
proprietary remedies, the pharmaceuticals and a variety of the 
popular domestic remedies, such as castor oil, essence of pepper- 
mint, potassium chlorate tablets, etc., neatly done up in bottles 
ready for handing out, each bottle being wrapped in transparent 
paichment paper. In the corner is a small porcelain sink, with hot 
and cold water. The prescriptions are pasted into books in the 
usual manner. 

At the right on entering the pharmacy is a handsome plate 

glass case filled with 
cut flowers and refrig- 
erated by ammonia coils. 
Next comes the cashier's 
desk, beneath which is a 
small but select stock of 
such sundries as thermos 
bottles, kodaks, manicure 
sets and Gillette safety 
razors. The adjoining 
show case is devoted ex- 
clusively to Huyler's 
candies, a full assort- 
ment being kept in stock. 
In the wall case back of 
this is a large assort- 
ment of fancy boxes for 
the candies. Next comes 
a case containing 
sponges, rubber sundries 
and even a few boxes of 
choice and dainty sta- 
tionery. The only drugs 
in evidence from the 
front are pharmaceutical 
preparations in small, 
neat, square bottles, with 
recessed glass labels, be- 
hind the sundries' show 
case. Across the south- 
ern end of the pharmacy 
is a case devoted exclu- 
sively to perfumery. 

The effect of the 
whole is that of a dainty 
boudoir rather than an 
ordinary drug shop. At 
night the soft radiance 
of the colored lantern- 
breaks into prismatic 
colors on the many faceted cut glass. The store is permeated 
with a delicate, subtle perfume, the odor of which is changed 
from day to day; while the noises of the distant street make a 
low diapason to the faint, sweet strains of the orchestra in the 
Orangerie near by. 

Some Metropolitan Prices. 

Only the daintiest and most exquisite articles fit into such sur- 
roundings, and, excepting for drugs and the products of the James 
laboratories, which are "featured," only these are kept. A small 
cake of toilet soap sells at $3.25 ; a single ounce vial of extract, 
in a case, sells at $15; a cake of soap, a box of face powder, a 
small bottle of toilet water and a smaller one of an extract in 
a box, sell at $35. And to the average druggist the interest- 
ing thing is that they sell. Powder puffs, six inches in diameter, 
which sell at $2 each, and go nicely in lacquered boxes of suita- 
ble dimensions, which retail at $2.50 to $4, seem not exorbitantly 
high in such environment. It does not take many sales of this 
run up a very comfortable sum, and, though the 



44 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



store, has been opened barely a month, its financial success is 
already certain. 

"The Hotel Astor pharmacy is past the experimental stage," 
said Mr. James to the representative of the American Drug- 
gist, "but I shall have to feel my way for a little while yet to 
make sure of the needs of my patrons, or, rather, their wishes. 
People skimp on the necessities, they 
squander on their luxuries. It pays bet- 
ter to cater to their wishes than to their 
wants; and here the Astor pharmacy of- 
fers a unique field. It caters only to the 
wealthy. The hotel itself acts as a filter, 
keeping out all save those who have 
money to spend, and as a consequence I 
have a unique class of patrons. 

"Credit for the architectural features 
of the store," said Mr. James, "must be 
given to Mr. Bangs, of Boston, who de- 
signed, made and installed the fixtures, 
putting into the details of their construc- 
tion the knowledge gained through his 
many years of study of the needs of the 
pharmacist in the matter of drug store 
fixtures." 

An Ethical Pharmacy. 

"The store is in the highest degree 
ethical ; in it no patent medicines are dis- 
played, and no effort is made to foster 
self medication. There is no soda water. 
There are no cigars. It is true that fresh 
flowers seem a little outside the pale of 




Whc 



the Hotel Astov 



pharmacy, but you will observe that we have many pharmaco- 
pceial blossoms, convallaria majalis, rosa gallica, etc., though in 
more attractive forms than that in which they are recognized 
in the Pharmacopoeia. As you will see, this feature of the 
business is not unduly emphasized, and the presence of the 
flowers adds distinctly to the charm and beauty of the 
whole." 

As Mr. James leaned back, the picture 
of cosmopolitan success, it was hard to 
realize that that success had been achieved 
unaided by the country lad, who, at the 
age of sixteen, began to wash bottles at 
$3 a week for James A. Hart at Ossining, 
then known by a "shorter and an uglier 
name." "He must have been saving bot- 
tles all. his life," said Mr. James. "There 
was a whole cellar full of them, and I 
spent two years in washing them. If 
there is anything in the world I know 
how to do it is to wash bottles, and even 
after the lapse of these many years I feel 
quite competent to wash any bottle that 
may be put before me." 

But this is not the only thing he can 
do well, for he was one of the honor men 
m the class of 1889 of the New York 
College of Pharmacy, and he had even 
then been manager for a year of the 
Schwartz pharmacy, at Forty-fourth street 
and Eighth avenue, which became his 
own property only a year after gradua- 
tion. 



I.. K. JAMES, Ph.G., 
fourth pharmacy has just been opened i 




INTERIOR OF JAMES PHARMACY, HOTEL ASTOK. 
Refrigerator show case for cut flowers on right. 

Index page 50. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



45 



HEARING ON THE FOSTER BILL. 



Department Officials Would Make It More Stringent -Manufac- 
turers and Wholesalers Wish Modifications— One Retail Drug- 
gist Opposes— Hardships Imposed on Retailer -Mr. Koch 
Opposes Changes. 

(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Washington, January 19. — Before the Ways ar.d Means Com- 
mittee of the House of Representatives, representatives of the 
wholesale and retail drug trade, of the government, and of the 
medical profession, on January II, presented elaborate state- 
ments concerning the Foster anti-narcotic bills now pending 
In fore the committee, some of these bills having been introduced 
at the instance of representatives of the State Department. 
Among those who were present at the hearing were H. P. 
Hynson, of Baltimore; Dr. L. F. Kebler, Christopher Koch, of 
Philadelphia; Dr. Alexander Lambert, Dr. William Muir, Don- 
ald McKesson. Albert Plant. Dr. William J. Schieffelin and 
Charles B. Towns, of New York; Charles. A. West, of Boston; 
H. W. Wiley, Charles M. Woodruff and Hamilton Wright. 
Letters were read from Thomas P. Cook, H. B. French and 
others. 

The N. W. D. A. View. 

Charles A. West, of Boston, Mass., spoke first in behalf of 
the legislative committee of the Wholesale Druggists' Associa- 
tion. Mr. West described his position with reference to the bill 
as follows : 

We have no objection to the tax, but we think that there should be 
some statement denning what is a manufacturer, what is a wholesaler, and 
what is a retailer; and we would also' object to the articles coca leaves 
alpha and beta eucaine. chloral and cannabis being included, for the sim- 
ple reason that) coca leaves, if a record is to be kept of that as is pro- 
vided later on, is an article of very small moment to the drug trade, ex- 
cept to the manufacturer. Alpha and beta eucaine practically have no sale 
whatever. Chloral is an article which is rapidly decreasing in sale, and 
cannabis is not what may be called a habit-forming drug. The use of 
cannabis is in making the preparation called hasheesh, and hasheesh is a 
combination of cannabis and opium, so that hasheesh, if it ever achieved 
any sale in this country, would be covered by the title "preparations." 

My idea is to have the bill as simple as possible and have it work- 
able. Now, if you had merely opium, morphine, cocaine, their salts, 
derivatives, and preparations, it would be a much simpler bill to work and 
would accomplish all that is desired. As far as the special tax goes, 1 
would say that I see no objection to that whatever. It has been proposed 
that the manufacture! should pay a larger tax than the wholesaler, but it 
seems to me it should be definitely determined where the line is to be 
drawn between the manufacturer and the wholesaler and the retailer. The 
principal objection to this bill, as far as the wholesale trade is concerned, 
is to section 2, which proviues for a stamp tax. Now, anyone not familiar 
with the drug business might say that that was a perfectly desirable feature, 
but when you stop to think that the drug business is composed of certainly 
over 100,000 items in daily use, and this bill provides for a stamping on 
probably over 5,000 individual preparations, opium and morphine and chloral 
in all its forms, down even to the minutest tablets for hypodermic use, 
you will see what that means. The law also provides that the stock on 
hand, of manufactured goods, should pay a tax on the amount of crude 
material contained at the time the law went into effect. That would be, 
of course, absolutely impossible to determine from the very nature of the 
business. In order to make this bill workable, and to attain the object 
that is desired, it should be as simple as possible, and it seems to me that 
if you confined it to the three drugs I have spoken of originally — opium, 
morphine, and cocaine — it would serve its purpose much better than to have 
it contain a long list of goods. 

I called on the Commissioner of Internal Revenue yesterday and asked 
him for an explanation "of what the provision meant, and he stated that 
he should require a stamp placed on every proprietary article containing 
even the minutest quantity of opium, morphine, or cocaine, in order to 
trace it to its finality. Now, that means that we would have to keep 0 
record of over 5,000 items. On one side of the sheet we would have to 
put all that we buy; on the other side we would put down all that we 
sell; and we would strike a balance for such a time as the commissioner 
required. If the special agent called and found that our stock was in any 
way different from what it should be. then there is the penalty provided 
for in the internal revenue act, and it seems to me it makes the law appear 
ridiculous to think of carrying it out to such an extent. 

Mr. West further recommended the insertion of the following 
provision in section 1 of the bill: 

That persons making sales, distribution, or disposition of cough remedies 
and other domestic and proprietary preparations: Provided, That such prep- 
arations are sold or distributed in good faith as medicines and not for the 
purpose of evading the provisions of this Act: And provided, That such 
preparations do not contain more than two grains of opium, or one-fourth 
of a grain of morphine, or one-fourth of a grain of heroin, or one grain of 
codeine, or their salts, in one fluid ounce; or, if a solid preparation, in 
one avoirdupois ounce, excepting liniments and ointments which are pre- 
pared for external use only; or preparations containing opium or any of 
its salts, which are sold in good faith for diarrhoea, cholera, or neuralgia; 
or powder of ipecac and opium, commonly known as Dover's powders; or 
compound medicinal tablets, pills, or powders containing not over one- 
twentieth of a grain of morphine, or one-twelfth of a grain of heroin, or 
one-fourth of a grain of codeine, or any of their salts, to each pill, powder. 



or tablet; Provided, That such preparations are sold or distributed in good 
faith as medicines and not for the purpose of evading the provisions of this 
act. 

He also advocated the insertion of the word "knowingly" in 
section 4 of the bill, so that there might be protection against 
the penalty in case of an unintentional violation of the law. 
Some other changes — such as the elimination of the exemption 
of public hospitals and scientific institutions — were suggested, 
and it was recommended that greater liberty be given to the 
courts in fixing penalties for violation. 

Changes Proposed. 

Dr. Schieffelin, speaking as president of the National Whole- 
sale Druggists' Association, said : 

Without any opposition to this bill, or criticizing the features of it, 
I am suggesting certain improvements, and I am in favor of the bill, and 
I would like to add something to what the chairman of the committee on 
legislation of the National Wholesale Druggists' Association has said in his 
statement, because I am the president of the National Wholesale Druggists' 
Association and have been working for a number of years to have some 
such federal legislation supplementary to the state legislation. This is not 
a bill to prevent the sale of these drugs; it is a bill to make it possible 
to enforce state laws by tracing the sources of these drugs, and finding 
out how much is imported or manufactured, and where all that is manu- 
factured goes to. Then the state authorities can take action. The way it 
is now, the commissioner of police of New York City wrote that it was im- 
possible to trace where the cocaine comes from, because the moment the 
New York law was enforced the class who wished to evade it imported their 
cocaine from abroad, or else from other states where it is manufactured. 
This is merely a device to render effective these state laws by tracing all 
of the morphine, cocaine, and opium sold; but I want to point out that 
it is exceedingly important not to overload this law with provisions that 
would render it ineffective and would defeat its purpose. It is hardly pos- 
sible to require that every one of the wholesalers and retailers shall register 
every preparation that they sell that contains a fractional amount, even to 
the faintest trace. The Commissioner of Internal Revenue said that under 
this law, even if there was one hundredth of a grain of morphine in a 
preparation, it would have to be registered. In the first place, neither the 
retailer nor the wholesaler is able to do that, and, in the second place, 
this system, as provided here, of following it up would hardly carry this 
out. What I would like to suggest is that instead of requiring supple- 
mentary stamps on these things, each wholesaler and retailer should have 
his license number, and should be required to place that license number 
on every package that he sells. 

Then, if I manufacture cocaine and sell it to a wholesaler in Phila- 
delphia it will bear my number, and if he sells it to a retailer it will bear 
his number, and it can be traced back, and that would do away with the 
stamps and the supplementary stamps, and it would be possible, instead 
of having this stamp provision, to have a higher license, and secure all 
the revenue needed from the license part of the law from the special tax 
on the dealer. Cut that paragraph 2, as suggested by Mr. West, is to us 
very important. Otherwise the law will be so burdensome that it will prob- 
ably not be enforced or enforceable. I simply wanted to ask that. I 
would say for the benefit of Mr. Calderhead that this is not for the purpose 
of prohibiting the sale, but it is one of the links in the chain that is 
absolutely essential in order to restrict the traffic in these drugs to its 
legitimate channel. I will be glad to answer any questions that occur to 
any members of the committee. 

He thought in general that while the bill was desirable, its 
present form was unworkable. 

Objections from Manufacturers. 

Charles M. Woodruff spoke in behalf of six manufacturing 
concerns, including Parke, Davis & Co. and others. He opposed 
the form of the bill and said : 

We have no objection to a law in support of the state laws restricting 
the sale of cocaine and morphine. We are in sympathy with the state laws 
so far as their purpose is concerned, but in some of the states the require- 
ments for keeping records are so complex, so complicated, that it is im- 
possible to comply with them. 

Now, it has been suggested that if the retail druggist can keep a 
record of his sales of poison, why not the manufacturer? Think a mo- 
ment. The retail druggist is approached by a customer who wants an 
ounce or half an ounce of one of these drugs. The druggist can jot down 
in his book, "John Jones, half an ounce of such and such a thing for such 
and such a purpose," right on the spot. We get anywhere from 300 to 
400 orders every day, requiring a force of from 100 to 250 clerks in 
checking them up, assembling them, and so forth, and they come in this 
shape: Here is a sample-line order, beginning with the fluid extracts. 
Here is a price list of fluids, solids, and powdered extracts, and so forth. 
This is a sample-line order. That is intelligible to us, because each prepa- 
ration has a number. It is intelligible to our order clerks, because every 
preparation has a number. Every package which is sent out by the pharma- 
ceutical manufacturer bears an individual number that will enable him to 
trace it back to the very source of the crude-drug supply. Now, if any of 
the members of the committee here will go into this subject with me and 
show me how we can keep the record required by this bill and not make 
clerical omissions, I would be glad to consent to keep the record. This 
same question, Mr. Chairman, came up in Michigan, when it was proposed 
to enact cocaine laws similar to the New York state law and the Illinois 
state law. The State Pharmaceutical Association in Michigan complimented 
me by calling me in for advice. I showed them the impracticability of 
these laws, and I showed them a way out of it so that the object of this 
record could be attained. The Michigan law is like this. The sale of cer 
tain habit-forming drugs is forbidden. Then I am going to show you how 
this law can be fixed. Then, though wholesalers and retailers and manu- 
facturers and physicians may, under certain restrictions, sell, and so forth, 
yet the manufacturer or wholesaler who supplies the retailer must have an 
order written upon a separate sheet of paper, not containing other items, 
inhibited by the law, signed not only by the man, but in the capacity in 
which he purports to buy, "John Jones, registered pharmacist," and under 
that law if the man signs the words "registered pharmacist" for the pur- 
pose of getting the cocaine or morphine he is penalized. The time has 



Index page 51. 



4 6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



come, Mr. Chairman, when we must stop making a goat of the manufacturer. 
The welfare of this country depends upon the welfare of the manufacturer. 
Now, the manufacturer or wholesaler can not fill the order unless it is 
signed "John Jones, registered pharmacist." If that man signs as a reg- 
istered pharmacist and is not a registered pharmacist, he comes within the 
law. 

Now, another thing; it is easy for the manufacturer. These orders 
we must keep on file for five years, just the same as under the state law 
the retail pharmacist must keep his prescriptions on file for a definite 
period. These files are arranged on a sort of card system. All of John 
Jones's orders are together. Your inspectors, any time they please, can 
walk into our establishment and run these orders over and find who are 
buying. It is easy for the wholesaler and manufacturer, and it accom- 
plishes all the purposes of the law. Another thing. Massachusetts, after 
looking over the various state laws, adopted the Michigan law, with this 
addition, and it is an improvement. We are trying to get it in the Michi- 
gan law during the session. The possession of cocaine by an unauthorized 
person is an offense. I speak of this, Mr. Chairman, to show that it is 
possible to reach the habit, as far as it is possible to reach it by any 
positive law, by a law that will not throw the whole burden upon the manu- 
facturer or the wholesaler. This measure is hardly a police measure and 
it is hardly a revenue measure. I am not going to take any more time 
now, unless to answer questions, except to read a tentative bill, very short, 
that will reach the evil, a bill that will reach the evil that this bill seeks 
to reach. I have written this this morning after thinking of the matter. 
I will read it. It is as follows: 

A BILL to regulate interstate commerce and commerce with foreign 
nations and Indian tribes in certain habit-forming drugs. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives 
in Congress assembled, That it shall be unlawful for any person 
who cannot lawfully purchase, receive, sell, or give away or possess 
any opium, morphine, cocaine, alpha or beta eucaine, chloral, can- 
nabis, their salts, derivatives, or preparations, in the state, terri- 
tory, or insular possession in which he may reside or be, or to 
whom it is unlawful to sell or give away any such drugs, their 
salts, derivatives, or preparations in the state, territory, or insular 
possession in which he may reside or be, to import or receive any 
of said drugs, their salts, derivatives, or preparations from any 
other state, territory, insular possession, or from any foreign 
country. 

Sec. 2. That any person violating any of the provisions of 
this act shall, on conviction thereof, be fined not more than one 
thousand dollars for each violation or imprisoned for not longer 
than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discre- 
tion of the court. 

Sec. 3. That the word "person" as inserted in this act shall 
he construed to mean and include a partnership, association, com- 
pany or corporation as well as a natural person. 

William Muir, of Brooklyn, N. Y., spoke in behalf of the 
retailers of New York, contending that the bill would not work 
successfully on account of its clumsiness. Dr. Muir said in part: 

The Kings County (N. Y.) Pharmaceutical Society and the 
New York State Pharmaceutical Association authorized me to be present 
here to oppose this measure. Now, in New York we feel as though we 
have passed the best prohibitive law in this country. We have a law 
similar to that of Massachusetts, under which, if you have possession of 
cocaine, it is presumptive evidence of dealing in it; but you can realize the 
hardship that this is going to cause to the retail trade and the pharmacists 
of this country. We have heard the wholesalers, who claim that it will 
be so much trouble to enfore that law. Now, look upon it from the re- 
tailers' side, who have not 400 clerks in an establishment to keep 
records, and who have everyone of the 641 preparations in the manufactur- 
ing house in the store. The pharmacist has to handle those preparations 
alone. There are 641 preparations that a pharmaceutical house has put out 
in hundreds and thousands, and he has to sell them in fives and tens all 
alone in his store. It would be a physical impossibility, no matter how 
honest he was, no matter how honorable the man was, to keep a record of 
the preparations containing morphine, chloral, cannabis indica, and all 
those things. Every time he sold a corn cure he would have to run to 
that sheet and make a record of it. Somebody told me that this would 
only affect interstate commerce, and I can see the object of making it a 
dollar, so that it would be enforced under the ■ internal revenue laws by 
having the retailers pay a dollar and give a bond and make monthly re- 
turns of the amount sold. 

Now, this bill does not prohibit the sale. I heard one gentleman here 
say that it furnished statistics for future legislation. Does this House 
want to put 40,000 retail druggists to work on a schedule, writing down 
on a sheet of paper everything they sell, so as to furnish statistics for 
future legislation? The druggists work fourteen hours a day — sixteen 
hours, some of them — to earn a livelihood. I can assure you that an honest 
man would walk the floor the other eight hours, instead of sleeping, if he 
attempted to conform to this bill. It could not be carried out; he could 
not make the data on every sale. This reminds me somewhat of a state 
law, and I think it is applicable, because in New York they register 
laudanum. 

This provides for p. bond. No bonding company will bond a man 
for less than $7.50. In fact, I think when they find out how liable a 
man is to make a mistake under this law, these bonds will be very ex- 
pensive — more than $7.50- — because they look upon those things as to the 
risk, and when they realize what it means for a man to keep records with- 
out making errors you can readily see what they will think of it. 

The wholesalers, of course, have a grievance about the number of 
clerks it will take. The retailer in the same manner oftentimes has a 
relief clerk only one day in the week. He cannot afford to employ a clerk. 
That relief clerk comes in for one day in the week; and imagine the errors 
he might make for the proprietor. He might not keep the records, or if 
he was a discharged clerk, he could go to his files and show where that 
man did not have the records, did not keep them; and he would 
be at his mercy all the time, trying to comply with the law. If this pro- 
hibited the sale or in any way lessened the sale it would be different, but 
this keeping of records does not do that. It merely gives a man the right 
to sell them. He will have to sell them under the state law, of course, 
but I think the state takes pretty good care of that. All the states are 
coming to the same thing, and I do not think this great country is going to 
ruin. I heard one man say before the New York Board of Health that 
50 percent, of the people are using dope. I think the majority of people 
today are strong and healthy. I told him that he must have visited a 
sanitarium to get that idea, and if he would just go out into Central 
Park he would see the finest, strongest, most robust specimens of manhood 
that he could find anywhere in the world. I believe that this country is 
all right. F.ducation has come along and we have found cocaine, which 
is a new thing. I admit the curse of cocaine, and I was active in the 



prohibition of it in New York State; but how many men understood it 
when it was first introduced? The doctors did not understand it. They 
applied it to Gen. U. S. Grant freely when it first came out, and they did 
not know that it was going to make a dope fiend of anyone. It was hailed 
as a great discovery for the relief of pain. Now we have found that it 
is a bad thing. The state laws prohibit it and do not allow it to be put 
up. But look at the remedial effect of opium when applied to the relief of 
pain; look at the good side. Every doctor has opium in his saddlebags or 
his handbags. Every one of them carries morphine in his pocket with a 
hypodermic syringe. We admit that wrong sometimes comes from good 
things. We admit there are a good many people killed by automobiles; 
but there is a good deal of pleasure to be obtained from them; and this 
idea of stamping this out and killing it is wrong, because you cannot 
stamp it out with any such means as this. 

Professor Hynson Opposes Foster Bill. 

Prof. Henry P. Hynscn, of the faculty of the department of 
pharmacy, University of 'Maryland, a member of the drug firm 
of Hynson, Westcott & Co., presented a written statement as 

follows : 

From the American Pharmaceutical Association. 

First. — That the list of drugs and chemicals appearing in Section 1 
is incomplete, since it does not include a number of synthetic products, 
namely, alypin, novocaine and holocaine, which are neither derivatives nor 
salts of any of the drugs nominated, but which have the same harmful and 
destructive qualities as cocaine, also that no provision is made, if possible, 
to control the importation and sale of other synthetics of like nature that 
may be subsequently introduced. Special attention is also called to the 
desirability of mentioning the trade marked name of such a derivative as 
diacetyl morphine, marketed as "heroin." 

Second. — That it is practically impossible to satisfactorily or effectively 
separate manufacturers and dealers, to be registered under the act, into 
the wholesale and retail classes provided for; the lines between these, in 
many and nearly all cases, is imperceptible. A large number of jobbers 
sell at retail and many more retailers sell at wholesale. Nearly all retail 
pharmacists manufacture these, so-called, original drugs into their various 
preparations. It would seem wise, therefore, to have but one class of 
registered dealers under this act, each paying a uniform fee of, say, two 
dollars and that the bond of each shall be in proportion to the amounts 
of these drugs a person may handle. 

Third. — That Section 2 is involved, ambiguous and not in accord with 
Section 6. Also that it is faulty in the provision that requires a special 
tax to be paid upon crude products and allows alkaloids and alkaloidal 
salts, that are separated and made from the crude drugs, to be imported 
into this country free of the special tax and entirely without control, which 
would seem to render the act non-effective in the very object sought to be 
obtained. 

Fourth. — That the provisor of Section 2 is too greatly restricted and 
the privileges given to the "duly registered and bonded manufacturing 
chemist or manufacturing pharmacist" should be extended to any person 
duly registered and bonded under this act. 

Fifth. — That the absolute prohibition of interstate commerce in these 
drugs, except between those registered under this act, as provided for in 
Section 4, will entail unjust, unkind and injurious hardships upon many 
citizens residing near the border lines of our respective states and upon 
those citizens who may temporarily reside outside of their own states and 
away from their regular physicians and pharmacists. It would, therefore, 
seem that legitimate sales on the original prescriptions of physicians should 
be exempt from the operations of this law. To the several states must 
be left the control of the writers of prescriptions, within their respective 
borders. 

Sixth. — That Section 6 provides a penalty for the non-payment of the 
special tax on the salts, derivatives and preparations of the cited drugs, 
when no provision for the laying and rating of such a tax has been made. 

Because of these facts and to make our contentions more explicit and 
exact, I most respectfully submit these several amendments for consideration: 

Amend Section 1, page one, by striking out all after "opium," line 4, 
up to "and," in line 6, and substitute the following: Morphine, diacetyl, 
morphine, heroin, codeine, cannabis, hydrated chloral, holocaine, novocaine, 
alpha eucaine, beta eucaine, alypin, coca leaves, cocaine, their salts, deriva- 
tives, preparations or compounds or any substance or synthetic product or 
chemical that may be used as a substitute- for cocaine, or having the same 
local stimulating effect as cocaine, under whatsoever name it may be known 
or described. 

Amend Section 1, page 2, line 1, by striking out the word "or" and 
inserting a comma; lines 2 and 3, by striking out the word "or" and in- 
serting a comma; lines .2 and 3, by striking out all after "jobber," up 
to "retailer" and by substituting a comma and the words, "dispensing 
pharmacist"; in line 5, amend by changing "one dollar" to "two dollars." 

Amend Section 2 by including the full list of drugs, chemicals, etc., 
that is cited in Section 1 and by making proper provision for an equitable 
tax rating on each of these. Also amend Section 2. page 3, by inserting 
after the word "any," in line 11, the word "person," and by striking out 
the words, "manufacturing chemist or manufacturing pharmacist" and in- 
serting in their place the words, "under this act." 

Amend Section 4 by introducing after the word "to," line 20, the 
words, "the dispensing of the original prescriptions of legalized practitioners 
of medicine, to." 

Section 6 will need no amendment if Section 2 is amended to conform 
with Section 1, otherwise Section 6 should be made to agree with Section 2, 
as now constructed. 

Donald McKesson, of New York, supported some of the sug- 
gestions of Mr. West and said that with due modification his 
firm was strongly in favor of the passage of a proper bill ttv 
restrain the sale of habit forming drugs. 

Thomas P. Cook, speaking for the drug trade section of the 
New York Board of Trade and Transportation, favored a meas 
tire applying to morphine, cocaine and opium, but urged the elim- 
ination of other provisions and changes in the administrative- 
feature. 



Index page 52. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



47 



Albert Plant, of Lehn & Fink, New York, spoke along the 
same lines as the other dealers, recommending proper administra- 
tive changes. He advocated the limitation of the law to a com- 
paratively small number of drugs. 

Charles B. Towns, representing the Charles B. Towns Hos- 
pital, urged that the bill was not half strong enough and that 
the sale of the drugs should be restricted to licensed druggists. 
He thought that any drug which contained the least bit of opium 
should be included in the scope of the bill. 

Dr. Alexander Lambert, of New York, urged the passage of 
the bill in the form in which it had been presented. 

Charles A. Darius, representing Merck & Co., of New York, 
recommended a reduction of the tax to one cent a pound on 
chloral hydrate and one-quarter of one cent per pound on coca 
leaves. 

Dr. Harvey W. Wiley urged the passage of the bill and its 
extension to a number of other products besides those mentioned. 
He opposed the changes suggested by the manufacturers. 

Dr. Lyman F. Kebler spoke along the same lines and particu- 
larly attacked the use of soothing syrups. Mr. Koch answered 
some of the arguments that had been presented and opposed the 
changes suggested by the manufacturers. Hamilton Wright, who 
has been advocating the bill, also opposed the introduction of 
these changes. 



Text of the Foster Antinarcotic Bill. 

H. R. 25,241. 

A bill imposing a tax upon and regulating the production, manufacture, 
and distribution of certain habit-forming drugs. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That every person who 
imports, exports, produces, or manufactures opium, morphia, coca leaves, 
cocaine, alpha and beta eucaine, chloral, cannabis, their salts, derivatives, 
or preparations, and every person who further manufactures, compounds, 
deals in, or distributes the aforesaid drugs, or either of them, shall register 
with the collector of internal revenue of the district his name or style, 
place of residence, and place where such business is to be carried on, and 
at the time of such registry, and on or before the first day of July in 
each year, every importer, exporter, 'producer, wholesale dealer, jobber, or 
wholesale manufacturer of the aforesaid drugs, their derivatives and prepa- 
rations, shall pay to said collector a special tax at the rate of ten dollars 
per annum, and every retailer or distributer at retail shall pay to the said 
collector a special tax at the rate of one dollar per annum. . . . 

Section 2. That there shall be levied and collected upon all of the 
aforesaid original drugs, to wit, opium, chloral, cannabis, and coca leaves 
now held by any such person, or hereafter produced or received, an in- 
ternal-revenue tax of five cents per pound or fraction of a pound on opium, 
chloral, and cannabis, and one cent per pound or fraction of a pound on 
coca leaves, and said taxes shall be paid by affixing to each package or 
other receptacle containing such original drugs, before removal of the same 
from a customs warehouse, their place of manufacture or storage, and 
before being offered for sale an engraved stamp to be affixed and canceled 
in such manner as the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval 
of the Secretary of the Treasury, may prescribe. . . . Provided, That 
where such original drugs, after payment of the tax thereon, are further 
manufactured or compounded by any person duly registered and bonded 
as required by this act, the packages or receptacles containing the same 
may, under regulations to be prescribed by the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, have affixe.l 
thereto, in lieu of the prescribed tax-paid stamps, such labels or marks 
as will show the payment of the tax on the original drugs before the same 
were further manufactured or compounded. 

Section 3. That every person importing, exporting, manufacturing, re- 
manufacturing, compounding, or offering for sale any such drugs, their 
salts, derivatives, or preoarations, shall keep such books, render such re- 
turns, and give such bonds as the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, witli 
the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, may from time to time 
prescribe. 

Section 4. That it shall be unlawful for any person to send or trans- 
port in interstate commerce any of the aforesaid drugs or any of then- 
salts, derivatives, or preparations, to any person other than a person who 
has registered and paid the special tax as required by section one of this 
Act, or for any person to receive, in interstate commerce, any of the 
aforesaid drugs or any of their salts, derivatives, or preparations, other 
than a person who is registered and has paid the special tax as required 
by section one of this Act; but nothing contained in this section shall 
apply to public hospitals or to public or scientific institutions. 

Section 5. Provides for removal of the drugs under bond. 

Section 6. That any person who knowingly purchases, receives, or 
sells, transfers, or gives away any of the aforesaid drugs, their salts, 
derivatives, or preparations on which the taxes have not been paid or to 
which the labels or marks imposed by this Act have not been affixed, or 
who violates or fails to comply with any of the requirements of this Act, 
or any regulation issued thereunder, shall, on conviction, be fined not less 
than five hundred nor more than five thousand dollars, or be imprisoned 
not less than one year nor more than five years, or both, in the discretion 
of the court. 

Section 7. Provides that possession of the drugs, salts, derivatives, or 
preparations named shall be deemed sufficient evidence of violation. 

Section 8. Provides for filing and recording returns. 

Section 0. Provides an appropriation of the sum of one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, or so much of it as may be necessary, for the pur- 
pose of carrying the law into effect. 

Index 



Section 10. Makes the administrative features of the internal revenue 
laws apply to this law. 

Section 11. Provides that the Act shall not be construed as modify- 
ing or revoking any of the provisions of the food and drugs act or of the 
act to prohibit the importation and use of opium for other than medicinal 
purposes. 



PRESIDENT TAFT RECOMMENDS ANTINARCOTIC 
LEGISLATION. 



Foster Bill Commended — A Pharmacy Law for Americans Resi 
dent in China. 



{From our Regular Correspondent.) 
■ Washington, Jan. 14. — President Taft on January 11 sent to 
the senate a special message calling attention to his recommen- 
dations in the annual message for 1909 regarding the Interna- 
tional Opium Commission and also calling attention to the re- 
port of the International Opium Commission which he sent to 
Congress on February 21, 1910, in which federal legislation for 
the control of "foreign and interstate traffic in certain menacing 
drugs" was asked. The President notes that Congress appropri- 
ated $25,000 to continue the efforts against opium, but he says : 

I now transmit a further report from the Secretary of State giving 
cogent reasons why the opium-exclusion act of February 9, 1909, should 
be made more effective by amendments that will prohibit any vessel en- 
gaged in trade from any foreign port or place to any place within the 
jurisdiction of the United States, including the territorial waters thereof, 
or between places within the jurisdiction of the United States, from carry- 
ing opium prepared for smoking, and that would make it unlawful to 
export, or cause to be exported from the United States and from terri- 
tories under its control or jurisdiction or from countries in which the 
United States exercise extraterritorial rights, where such exportation from 
such countries is made by persons owing permanent allegiance to the 
United States, any opium or cocaine, or any derivatives or preparations 
of opium or cocaine, to any country which prohibits or regulates their 
entry, unless the exporter conforms to the regulations of the regulating 
country. 

The Secretary of State further points out a defect in the opium- 
exclusion act of February 9, 1909, in that smoking opium may be manu- 
factured in the United States from domestically produced opium, and the 
pressing necessity for remedying that defect by an amendment to the 
internal revenue act of October 1, 1890, that would place a prohibitive 
revenue tax on all such opium manufactured within the jurisdiction of 
the United States from the domestically produced material; and he further 
urges the enactment of legislation which will control the importation, 
manufacture, and distribution in interstate commerce of opium, morphine, 
cocaine, and o.ther habit-forming drugs. 

I concur in the recommendations made by the Secretary of State and 
commend them to the favorable consideration of the Congress with a view 
to early legislation on the subject. 

Federal Regulation of Traffic in Narcotic Drugs. 

Secretary Knox, in the letter which President Taft transmits, 
describes the development of the movement against the traffic 
in opium in the Philippines and the Far East, and says: 

It would seem, then, to be necessary to amend further the opium- 
exclusion act so as to make it unlawful to export or cause to be exported 
from the United States and from territories under its control or juris- 
diction or from countries in which the United States exercises extraterri- 
torial rights, where such exportation from such countries is made by per- 
sons owing permanent allegiance to the United States, any opium or cocaine, 
or any derivative or preparation of opium or cocaine, to any country which 
prohibits or regulates their entry, unless the exporter conforms to the 
regulations of the regulating country. 



But even with the onium-exclusion act of February 9, 1909, and the 
internal-revenue act of October 1, 1890, effectively amended, the larger 
side of the opium problem as it confronts the nation today would remain 
unsolved. A wide inquiry has developed a consensus of opinion that it 
is impossible for the states and the municipalities thereof to effectively 
enforce their antidrug legislation and ordinances until there is some fed- 
eral act which will strictly control the importation, manufacture, and inter- 
state traffic in the more menacing drugs. Since the problem of the con- 
trol of habit-forming drugs first appeared in the United States, forty-five 
states have prohibited the sale of cocaine except on order from a physician. 
Twenty-four states regulate the sale of ooium and its derivatives, and 
thirteen restrict the sale of chloral. Several states have recently enacted 
legislation making possession of these drugs evidence for conviction, unless 
the person possessing them can prove to the satisfaction of a jury that 
his possession is legal. But, in spite of such state legislation, it has been 
found impossible for the states themselves effectively to enforce their 
laws, because of the ease with which these menacing drugs can be secretly 
introduced from state to state. 

After looking at the question broadly, the report of the American 
delegates to the International Opium Commission states: 

"It may be said in regard to the traffic in habit-forming drugs within 
the United States that each state of the Union in its relation to other 
states is much in the position of China in her relations with opium pro- 
ducing and trafficking countries, for, historically and otherwise, it has been 
demonstrated that China could not control her internal production and 
abuse of opium without a large measure of interstate or international 
assistance. In three- years more has been accomplished in the suppression 
of the Chinese intraprovincial opium traffic than was accomplished in the 
preceding two centuries, this being entirely due to the interstate or inter- 

•age 53. 



48 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



national effort now being made on her behalf for the control of her opium 
traffic and her abuse of the drug. In ever-increasing proportion the states 
of the Union have for fifty years, from lack of interstate or federal aid. 
been reproducing within themselves the opium problem as it appeared until 
quite recently in China. Studying by state and municipal laws to control 
the traffic in opium, morphine, and other habit-forming drugs, they have 
had to face the fact that the federal government, by tariff law, legalized 
the entry of a vicious form of opium, i. e., smoking opium, as well as an 
abnormal amount of medicinal opium for which a market was found by 
the importers and manufacturers. It is now a developed opinion in all 
of the states that no local law can control the abuse of opium and other 
habit-forming drugs, and that there must sooner or later be a superior 
federal law to assist the states in defending themselves from the menace 
of these drugs." 

Secretary of State Approves Foster Bill. 

In view of the well-ascertained facts, and having in mind the approach- 
ing international opium conference, it is a pressing necessity that the 
Congress enact legislation which will control the importation, manufacture, 
and distribution in interstate commerce of opium, morphine, cocaine, and 
other habit-forming drugs. After a wide consultation with all the legiti- 
mate interests likely to be affected by such legislation, there has been 
drafted a measure known as the Cullom or Foster bill, which is now be- 
fore the appropriate committees of the Congress. The object of this 
measure is to place as light a burden as possible on the legitimate importer, 
manufacturer, and dealer in these drugs, and at the same time to bring 
the entire business aboveboard and compel every transaction in the drugs 
from the moment of importation or manufacture to be conducted in the 
light of day. It is felt that if this subject is achieved the good sense of 
the American people will see to it that the illicit traffic, which is now wide- 
spread, shall come to an end. .[The provisions of the Foster bill are here 
outlined.] 

It should be stated that the revenue intended to be derived by the 
act has been calculated at the lowest possible rate — at a rate that will 
produce sufficient revenue to administer the act — for it would be a most 
unwise procedure for the government to attempt to raise a revenue from 
the traffic in these drugs. 

The amendments which I have suggested to the opium-exclusion act 
of February 9, 1909, and to the internal revenue act of October 1, 1890. 
have been introduced into the Senate and House of Representatives, and 
as in the case of the Cullom and Foster bill, are before the appropriate 
committees of Congress. The attempt has been made to treat the opium 
problem of the United States in a comprehensive and effective manner. 
There are several other bills before the Congress which attempt to deal 
with the problem. I do not undertake to pass upon the constitutionality 
or the legal advisability of any particular measure, but I respectfully sub- 
mit whether the atention of the Congress should not be called especially 
to the subject, in order that appropriate measures may be enacted for the 
suppression and control of the opium and allied evils. 

A Pharmacy Law for Americans in China* 

In conclusion Mr. Knox recommends the enactment of an 
adequate pharmacy law to govern American citizens resident in 
China, inasmuch as one of the "great evils growing out of 
the suppression of the opium evil in that country has been the 
flooding of the country with antiopium nostrums or cures, the 
.use of which threatens to become worse than the disease." 



KINGS COUNTY CONDEMNS THE FOSTER BILL. 



Much to Condemn, Little to Commend in the Measure— Will 
Not Accomplish Its Purpose— Pushing N. F. Propaganda. 



The January meeting of the Kings County Pharmaceutical 
Society held on the afternoon of January 10 was devoted mainly 
to a condemnation of the Foster antinarcotic bill, concerning 
which no one present had any good word to say. The provi- 
sions of the measure in the Amerigan Druggist for December 
26, page 381, were read. Dr. William Muir said that the meas- 
ure imposed most onerous conditions on the retail drug 
trade, and furthermore would not tend to restrict, the misuse 
of narcotic drugs. He could see much to condemn and nothing 
to commend in the bill as he understood it, and asked that the 
privilege of the floor be extended to Caswell A. Mayo, editor of 
the American Druggist, since Mr. Mayo might be able to throw 
some light upon the practical application of the measure. 

Mr. Mayo stated that he had come direct to the meeting 
from a conference with Dr. William Jay Schieffelin, president 
of the National Wholesale Druggists' Association, who had 
attended the preliminary hearing in Washington on December 
14, and the conference with Dr. Hamilton Wright in New York 
on Januaary 2. 

As a result of this interview, Mr. Mayo said that he was 
convinced that Dr. Muir had correctly interpreted the bill and 
that his statement of the effect which the passage of the measure 
would have agreed entirely with his own understanding of the 
matter. 



The N. A. R. D. and the Foster Bill. 

Quoting from the official report of the hearing held on De- 

c ember 14, Mr. Mayo read the resolutions adopted by the 
X. A. R. D. and the statement made by Willard S Richardson 
as chairman of the legislative committee of that organization 
that he could see no objection to the bill. Mr. Mayo said that 
the retail drug trade would unanimously endorse the resolu- 
tion adopted by the N. A. R. D. and co-operate in every prac- 
ticable way with the authorities in their efforts to prevent the 
illegitimate sale of narcotic drugs, but that he did not see in 
these resolutions any warrant for the approval of the terms of 
the Foster bill. 

Certain gentlemen favored the Foster bill, but they wanted it 
amended. The American Druggist had opposed the Foster 
bill because it needed amendment. The difference was that of 
tweedledee and tweedledum. • 

The only good end which the bill could achieve was to fur- 
nish to the local authorities evidence as to who had dealt in 
narcotic drugs.. He believed that this end could be accom- 
plished by imposing the revenue tax and the revenue inspection 
only on those who sold at wholesaale. The term "at wholesale" 
should be clearly defined in the bill as meaning the sale to 
some person other than the ultimate consumer. If the law 
were limited in its application manufacturers of and whole- 
sale dealers in, in general terms, individuals outside of the drug 
business and retail druggists themselves, might deal in the drugs 
at wholesale and escape on a technicality. Any possibility of 
such an evasion of the law would be obviated by the use of 
such a phrase as selling "at wholesale." The authorities them- 
selves seemed wholly unaware of the annual tax which the re- 
quiring of this bond would impose on the retailers. Under the 
New York State liquor tax law the retail druggist who wishes 
to take out a license to sell alcohol for mechanical purposes 
and to sell liquors on prescriptions only is required to furnish 
a bond and the bonding companies charge $10 for this bond, 
although the penalty for its infraction ranges from $10 to $25 
as the judge may see fit. With a minimum penalty of $500 as 
imposed under the Foster bill Mr. Mayo did not believe that 
the bonding company would issue bonds for less than $10 or 
$20 a year, which would be quite a burden to lay upon the re- 
tail druggist, particularly in view of the fact that this bill only 
hoped indirectly to aid in limiting the sale of narcotic drugs. 

In the conduct of so complex and varied a business as the 
retail drug trade technical violations might and undoubtedly 
would occur even in the most carefully conducted establish- 
ments. Under the Foster bill as it now stands, the minimum 
penalty which could be imposed for such a technical violation, 
regardless of the intent of the dispenser or of the possible con- 
sequences of the violation would be $500. A fine of $500 would 
entirely put out of business the average small retailer and this 
fine might be imposed; in fact, the judge would be compelled 
to impose, on conviction for a purely technical infraction of the 
law. 

In conclusion Mr. Mayo said that it might, as a matter of 
policy, be better for the society to commend the objects of the 
Foster bill and oppose its amendment rather than to come out, 
as the American Druggist had. in opposition to the measure. 

Kings County Against the Foster Bill. 

Dr. Muir rejected vehemently the suggestion that the society 
should as a matter of policy approve of the measure in any 
form, since it contained so much that was objectionable. Adrian 
Paradis said that the more he heard of the measure the worse 
it appeared. T. J. France moved that Dr. Muir be requested 
to appear at the hearing of the ways and means committee, to 
be held in Washington on the following day, January 11, and 
present the arguments of the 500 druggists who compose the 
Kings county society as against the passage of the bill. Dr. 
Frederick P. Tuthill moved the passage of a resolution to that 
effect. The resolution was adopted and Dr. Muir left at once 
for Washington. 



Index page 54. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



49' 



N. F. Propaganda Work. 

Charles Heimerzheim, as chairman of the trades committee, 
announced that the committee had a supply of printed post 
cards, ten of which would be furnished to any member sending 
a stamp for them. It was intended that the individual druggist 
would mail these cards, after signing them, to physicians in 
their own vicinity. The committee was granted an additional 
$100 to carry on the propaganda. 

The meeting was presided over by the president, Jacob H. 
Rehfuss, the minutes being recorded by the secretary, A. E. 
Hegeman. 

E. T. King gave an interesting informal talk on advertising 
for the city druggist, based on long experience as manager of 
the advertising department of Riker & Co. 



New York Conference Opposes Foster Bill. 

At a meeting of the Conference of Pharmaceutical Organiza- 
tions, held at the New York College of Pharmacy, on Wednes- 
day afternoon, January 18, a resolution was adopted instructing 
the secretary to direct the attention of the members of the con- 
ference to the objectionable features of the Foster bill from the 
retailers' standpoint, and to request the members to bring the 
subject before their respective organizations, with a view to agi- 
tating against the passage of the bill in its present form. The 
conference was presided over by the chairman, Dr. William Muir, 
and the discussions participated by Peter Diamond, Dr. Geo. C. 
Diekman, Hugo Kantrowitz, A. E. Hegeman, T. J. France and 
Caswell A. Mayo. 

Dr. Muir reported that he had been in touch with the 
New York City Board of Health at least once a week, and that 
.it now seemed probable that some modification of the morphine 
ordinance would be made in the near future. He directed atten- 
tion to the fact that the Brooklyn Medical Society had under 
discussion a bill to prohibit the promiscuous refilling of prescrip- 
tions, which is to be discussed at the next meeting of that body. 



DIVISION OF PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTY OF THE 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. 



Pharmacopoeial Standardizations— Methods of Qualitative 
Analysis. 

The division of pharmaceutical chemistry of the American 
Chemical Society held its Minneapolis meeting in the Chemistry 
Building of the University of Minnesota on December 29. The 
address of the chairman, Prof. A. B. Stevens, on pharmacopoeial 
standardization was especially interesting and timely, since Pro- 
fessor Stevens is a member of the Committee of Revision of the 
Pharmacopoeia and chairman of the sub-committee on proximate 
assays. The address outlined the work being done by the sub- 
committee mentioned and made clear the thoroughness and care- 
fulness with which the Pharmcopceia is being revised. The new 
and improved methods of committee work were also explained. 

The report of the committee on quantitative methods gave a 
resume of the analysis of mercury salts by six different methods. 
The committee has done valuable work and is being continued. 
The report, although merely a report of progress, was ordered 
published in order that the greatest benefit may be obtained from 
the work of the committee. 

The following papers were read at the meeting : 

The Citro Compounds of Iron, by A. B. Stevens ; Camphor in 
Oil and Sassafras, by E. R. Miller and C. H. Marsh; Assay of 
Gelsemium, by L. E. Sayre ; Rapid Determination of Sulphuric 
Acid with the Porous Clay Crucible, by F. Klein ; and Chemical 
Problems Suggested by the Cultivation of Medicinal Plants — (1) 
Stramonium, by E. Kremers. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 
Chairman, B. L. Murray ; vice-chairman, A. D. Thorburn ; sec- 
retary, F. R. Eldred ; members of the executive committee, A. B. 
Stevens and L. F. Kebler. 



EHRLICH'S 606 DISCUSSED AT THE NEW YORK 
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 



The Role of Dye Stuffs in Medicine— The New Experimental 
Therapy — Clinical Results Observed in One Hundred and 
Twenty-five Cases of Syphilis Treated with 606. 



The quarterly meeting of the New York College of Pharmacy, 
which was held in the main lecture hall of the college on the 
evening of January 17, was devoted principally to the discussion 
of Ehrlich's theories and their application in the use of his new 
remedy for syphilis known as 606, Salvarsan, or "Hata 606," a 
name just registered under serial number 52,280. 

Prior to the discussion of the papers the meeting was called 
to order by the honorary president, Ewen Mclntyre. The secre- 
tary, Thomas F. Main, read the minutes of the previous meeting 
and of the meetings of the Board of Trustees. He announced 
the appointment of a committee on nominations charged with the 
preparation of a ticket, as follows : C. O. Bigelow, Caswell A. 
Mayo, F. K. James, Reuben Smith and Ewen Mclntyre. 

The secretary directed attention to the Foster antinarcotic 
bill, which is now in the hands of the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee and which is intended to regulate the interstate traffic in 
habit forming drugs. He said that attention had already been 
called to this subject in the American Druggist, in the pages of 
which the text of the measure will be found. He thought it was 
a subject which merited the very careful study of all pharmacists,, 
as the provisions of the bill would prove most onerous in opera- 
tion. 

President Mclntyre then introduced Caswell A. Mayo as 
chairman of the committee on addresses, who in turn introduced 
Dr. Robert C. Hatcher, Professor of Pharmacy and Materia 
Medica at the Cornell University Medical School. Mr. Mayo 
introduced Dr. Hatcher as a member of the new profession of 
pharmacology, whose followers are neither doctors nor drug- 
gists, but something of both. Dr. Hatcher had the training of 
both a pharmacist and a physician, having graduated in phar- 
macy before he took up the study of medicine. Though not 
himself an ardent advocate for a restricted pharmacopoeia, Dr. 
Hatcher belonged to that class who had made a minute study of 
the action of half a dozen drugs, and claimed that they knew 
something about their action, but that neither they nor any one 
else knew anything about the action of the halance of the thou- 
sand or so drugs on the market, and who wished the new Phar- 
macopoeia to be restricted to the particular half dozen they knew 
about. 

The New Chemotherapy. 

Dr. Hatcher said that it was really a mistake to speak of 
chemotherapy as new, for neither the term nor the idea were of 
very recent origin, the germ of the idea having been put forth 
by Ehrlich twenty-five years ago, while the term itself has been 
in use for over a dozen years. Latterly, however, it has sprung 
into great popularity in connection with the success which had 
followed the use of salvarsan in the treatment of syphilis. The 
medical journals have been full of the theory and its applica- 
tion, and the pharmaceutical journals also have contained a 
good deal on it, the American Druggist in particular having 
presented the subject in a most lucid and attractive man- 
ner. He said the editor of the American Druggist had rather 
taken the attitude that in this field the chemist was leading the 
doctor by the nose. This attitude was hardly justified by the 
facts. In reality the novel feature of the present status of 
chemotherapy was that the medical man pointed out to the 
chemist the direction in which his work must be carried with a 
view to producing the desired results. 

Probably the most interesting feature of the production of 
salvarsan was the careful scientific methods pursued in its in- 
vention. This discovery was not merely a happy chance, as 
many seem to think. It was the result of carefully planned and 
elaborated theories based on widely extended observation as to 



Index page 55 



5° 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND 



PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



the effects produced by various groups of organic radicals and 
of certain forms of inorganic substances. 

Not a Mere Chance. 

Its discovery was not a merely happy chance, as many seem 
to think. It was the result of carefully planned and elaborated 
theories based upon widely extended observation as to the thera- 
peutic effects produced by various groups of organic radicles 
and of certain forms of inorganic compounds. Ehrlich surmised 
that quinquivalent arsenic was reduced to the trivalent form in 
the animal economy before becoming effective in the treatment 
of parasites. He decided that this step of reduction had best be 
made before the administration of the medicine, so that its 
action could be exercised immediately when injected. His 
studies were therefore restricted to compounds of arsenic in its 
trivalent form. 

At the same time, the selection of the proper organic radicle 
to produce the desired results was affected by a careful com- 
parative study of the change in effect produced by the retention 
or the elimination of certain radicles. Starting with a toxin 
which had been found to be efficacious in the treatment of the 
trypanosome which caused sleeping sickness, certain radicles 
were added and certain others discarded until, in accordance 
with the well thought out and scientific basis of experimentation, 
the compound known as "606" was built up. The speaker out- 
lined the theory of chemoceptors, which had been elaborated as 
an explanation of the action of this drug, and also sketched the 
development of the Ehrlich side chain theory and its bearing 
or. the question of disease. The address covered somewhat the 
same ground as that of Dr. Joseph L. Turner, of Philadelphia, 
which was printed in the American Druggist for January 9, 
page 23, but treated it somewhat differently, going more fully 
into the theoretical considerations which led to the final result 
obtained by Ehrlich. 

Clinical Results from the Use oi 606. 

At the conclusion of his remarks Mr. Mayo introduced Dr. 
John A. Fordyce, professor of dermatology at the University 
and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, who spoke of the clinical 
results observed in the administration of "606," or salvarsan. 
Doctor Fordyce spoke of the serious menace of syphilis to the 
welfare of the community, of the numerous cases in which it 
was contracted innocently, and directed particular attention to 
the fact that physicians were apt to contract the disease inno- 
cently in the course of their work. He said that during the past 
autumn he had treated no less than fifteen or twenty physicians 
himself, each of whom had been an innocent victim of syphilis. 
It was therefore a mistake to consider it as solely of venereal 
origin. 

He outlined the results that had been obtained by him in the 
one hundred and twenty-five cases of syphilis in which he had 
administered "606," saying that these results were particularly 
happy in cases of recent infection. The skin lesions and mucous 
patches in these cases disappeared with remarkable rapidity, and 
it differed materially in its effect on the general health from that 
produced by mercurial treatment, as the general health and 
weight of the patient improved promptly under salvarsan. In 
discussing the technique Professor Fordyce said that there were 
three methods of injection employed — subcutaneous injection of 
a suspension, injection into the deeper muscles of a solution, 
and the injection into the veins of a solution. The first method 
was followed by a pronounced and prolonged infiltration and the 
deposition of the remedy in the tissues, where it was very slowly 
absorbed. The injection of the solution into the deeper muscles 
was more prompt and efficacious in its action, but was followed 
by intense pain, extending over twenty-four hours. Doctor 
Fordyce himself advocated and used the intravenous injection of 
a solution. In any case, whatever method was used, it was 
necessary that the mixture or solution be neutralized by the aid 
of sodium hydroxide, as the remedy itself is an acid salt. Doctor 
Fordyce exhibited the apparatus used by him, which is illustrated 
herewith. This consi-ted of a graduated cylinder with a capacity 



of 500 Cc, a hypodermic syringe and a needle with a three way 
cock to connect them. 

Method of Administering Intravenously. 

The method of administration was described as follows: The 
ampul containing the remedy is opened, the contents emptied 
into the cylinder, 150 Cc of water warmed to about 180 degrees 
added, solution effected by agitation, a 15 percent, sodium 
hydroxide solution added, drop by drop, until the precipitate 
which forms at first is redissolved, about fifteen to eighteen 
drops being required, and the solution diluted to about 150 Cc. 
This is kept at a temperature of 105 degrees by placing it in a 
water bath until needed. 

A strap is tied around the biceps of the patient, the needle 
inserted into the lumen of any vein which stands out promi- 
nently, generally either the median cephalic or the median basilic 
vein. When the exudation of blood from the needle shows that 
it is properly inserted in the vein, the three way cock is attached. 
One of the tubes connected with this is then attached to the 
barrel of the syringe, previously filled with a normal saline solu- 




THt SuPG/GdL SUPPLY IMPORTING CS NEWVQRK 



Apparatus for intravenous injection of salvarsan. 

tioti. A trial is made with this to see if the point of the needle 
is within the lumen. In case it is not, the injection of the saline 
solution will not be harmful, whereas the injection of salvarsan 
solution might under such circumstances prove hurtful. This 
being determined, the saline solution is emptied, one tube from 
the three way cock placed in the graduated cylinder containing 
the solution of salvarsan, and the solution is then slowly pumped 
into the vein, the three way cock being operated by the physician, 
and the syringe by the assistant. 

Doctor Fordyce said that a single injection usually brought 
about the desired results, but that in some cases two or more 
doses were required, even as much as seven doses having been 
given in certain cases without apparent bad effect. In fact, the 
patient ordinarily suffered less from the later doses than they 
did from the first. As a matter of precaution, the patients were 
required to remain in the hospital for a few days after receiving 
the injection, but there was very little reaction of any kind 
observable as a rule. 

The question of deleterious effect of the remedy on the optic 
nerve had been discussed, and it seemed possible that occasionally 
it did have such an effect, but the evidence was not positive, since 
it seemed likely that the effects attributed to the remedy were in 
fact due to the disease and not to the remedy. 

The chairman then introduced Herman A. Metz, former 
Comptroller of the city of New York and the importer of sal- 
varsan, as a modern impiovement on the "pigmentarii," or dealer 
in dyes, who filled so prominent a place in the drug business in 



Index page 56. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



5i 



the early Roman Empire, and who, both a"s a merchant and as a 
technical chemist, was competent to speak with authority on 

The Role of Dyestuffs in Medicine. 

Mr. Metz said that, while the dyestuff dealer might have be- 
come very important to medicine, medicine was not of great im- 
portance to the dyestuff dealer. The few ounces of dyestuffs 
which he would be called upon to handle as drugs were cer- 
tainly insignificant from a commercial point of view in compari- 
son with the tons of dyestuffs which are used not for medicine 
but for their tinctorial value. He then spoke of the role of dye- 
stuffs in medicine, confining himself strictly to those which are 
known as coloring agents, and not including the derivatives, such 
as antipyrin, pyramidon, acetanilide, phenacetin, etc., which, while 
originally derived from aniline, are not themselves looked upon 
as dyeing material. 

The paper of Mr. Metz is printed in full on another page. 

Professor Rusby, who had discussed Dr. Hatcher's paper, 
moved that the thanks of the college be given to the lecturers for 
their most instructive and interesting addresses. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Dr. A. H. Elliott then moved that the chairman of the com- 
mittee on addresses and his associates be thanked for their suc- 
cessful efforts in preparing so attractive a programme, and one 
which had brought out, he was glad to observe, a larger attend- 
ance than he had ever seen at any stated meeting of the college. 
This motion being carried, the meeting adjourned. 



HISTORICAL TOPICS BEFORE THE NEW YORK BRANCH. 



Present Problems in Pharmacy Which Have Presented Them- 
selves in the Past— Galen Decried Adulteration in Ancient 
Rome— An Echo of Our Own Time. 



The January meeting of the New York branch of the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association was devoted to a lecture on 
the problems of pharmacy which have recurred from time to 
time in the history of the world. The subject was handled in 
a masterly manner by Dr. James J. Walsh, dean of the Medical 
School of Fordham University. The lecture is printed in full 
at page 26. At its conclusion Dr. David Allyn Gorton, author 
of "A History of Medicine'' which has just been published in 
two volumes by Putnam's, took occasion to congratulate the 
speaker on the charming manner in which he had presented the 
subj ect. 

The president of the branch, Otto Raubenheimer, called the 
attention of the members to a number of books on the historical 
aspects of pharmacy, including the work just published by Dr. 
Gorton, and "The Chronicles of Pharmacy," by the late A. C. 
Wootton, lately published by Macmillan. 

Referring to the contents of the Papyrus Ebers, Caswell 
A. Mayo stated that a handsome folio volume, published by 
Engelmann of Leipzig and containing a lithographic reproduc- 
tion in colors of the entire Papyrus Ebers with translations into 
German of parts of it would be found at the Astor Library, 
where he had occasion to consult it twenty years ago. 

The report of the committee on nominations was presented 
by Jacob Diner as chairman -and the following nominees pro- 
posed were elected to office without opposition : 

President, George H. Hitchcock; vice-president Dr. George 
C. Diekman; secretary, Hugh Craig; treasurer, Dr. Joseph 
Weinstein ; chairman of the committee on membership, W. F. 
McDowell ; chairman of committee on professional relations, 
Thomas D. McElhenie ; chairman of the committee on pharma- 
ceutical progress, Otto Raubenheimer ; chairman of the commit- 
tee on legislation, Thomas P. Cook. 

The secretary announced the death of J. Leroy Webber, and 
was instructed to draw up and send to the family of the deceased 
member suitable resolutions of condolence. 

Index pi 



Samuel W. Fairchild Elected President of the 
Union League Club. 

At the annual election of the Union League Club, of New 
York, held on January 12, Samuel W. Fairchild, senior member 
of the firm of Fairchild Brothers & Foster, was elected to the 
presidency. This is a distinguished honor, as the presidency of 
this club implies an unusual combination of qualities and achieve- 
ment. 

Mr. Fairchild is well and favorably known in pharmacy 
throughout the world. He graduated from the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy in 1873, and the honorary degree of Master 
in Pharmacy was conferred on him by the same institution in 
1890 in recognition of his distinguished services to pharmacy. 
It was under his presidency that the building at 115 West Sixty- 
eighth street was erected by the New York College of Phar- 
macy, of which he was president from il-'go to 1896. Mr. Fair- 
child has not confined his interest in pharmaceutical education 
to local affairs but lias founded and maintains the Fairchild 
scholarship in the school of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great 
Britain in London. 

Mr. Fairchild occupies a large place in the civic and social 
life of the city, as will be seen by the following partial list of 




SAMUEL VV. FAIRCHILD, Ph.M., 
New elected president of the Union League Club. 



the offices he holds and of the organizations to which he belongs. 
He is a trustee of the Bowery Savings Bank ; of the Home for 
Incurables, of the Grant Monument Association, of the Sevilla 
Home for Poor Children, and of the New York Polyclinic Med- 
ical School and Hospital. He is president of the Taft and 
Sherman Drug, Paint, Oil and Chemical Allied Trade Organiza 
lion, and of the Princess Anne Club of Virginia, is: a director 
of the Market and Fulton Bank and of the United States Life 
Insurance Company, was one of the incorporators of the Bronx 
Botanical Garden, represented the City of New York at the Col- 
umbian Exhibition in Chicago, was a trustee of the Hudson-Ful- 
ton Commission, is a member of the executive committee of the 
New York Chamber of Commerce and of the Pilgrims' Society, 
and a member of the following organizations : American Phar- 
maceutical Association, the New York State Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation, the New York College of Pharmacy, the New England 
Society, the Society of the Sons of the Revolution, the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, the New York Botanical Garden. He also belongs to the 
following clubs : Metropolitan, Lawyers, Fulton, Ardsley, and 
Camp Fire, New York, Travelers of Paris, Southside Sports- 
men's of Long Island, Virginia of Norfolk, and the Princess 
Anne of Virginia. In the Union League Club. Mr. Fairchild 

ge 57- 



52 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



has been almost continually in office since 1896, having been 
chairman of the executive committee twice, chairman of the 
house committee twice, and vice president twice. He therefore 
brings to the presidency a unique experience in the affairs of 
the organization. 

Greater New York. 



David C. Whitney, vice-president of Parke, Davis & Co., of 
Detroit, Mich., visited that company's New York branch last 
■week. 

A. M. Hopper, of the New York City sales force of Eli Lilly 
& Co., and Mrs. Hopper, have just returned from a brief visit to 
Ormond Beach, Fla. 

The friends of George T. RiefHin will be grieved to learn of 
the death of his ion, Ernest George, which occurred on Janu- 
ary 11, in his twenty-second year. 

Asa G. Candler, president of the Coca-Cola Company, spent 
several days toward the close of 1910 with S. L. Willard, the 
eastern manager of the company. 

The annual ball of the Alumni Association of the New York 
College of Pharmacy will be held on Tuesday evening, February 
7, in Eldorado Hall, at Fifty-second street and Seventh avenue. 

At the December meeting of the New York Retail Druggists' 
Association, Dr. Joseph Weinstein was elected president, L. 
Marmor recording secretary, George H. Palitz corresponding 
secretary, and Peter Diamond treasurer. 

The estate of O. C. Kleine has sold the pharmacy formerly 
conducted by the late treasurer of the Kings County Pharma- 
ceutical Society at 110 Hamburg avenue, Brooklyn, and Mrs. 
Kleine has removed with her family to Union Course, Jamaica, 
L. I., where they will take up their residence. 

Dr. Charles E. Vanderkleed, professor of pharmaceutical 
chemistry, at the Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, and 
chief chemist for the H. K. Mulford Company, delivered an 
interesting and instructive address on standardization, chemical 
and physiological, at the New York College of Pharmacy, before 
the Aulmni Association on Wednesday evening, January 11. 

At the annual meeting of the Westchester County Pharma- 
ceutical Association, held at Hotel Frankfort in Yonkers, on 
January 11, the following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: President, J. Roemer, White Plains; first vice-president, 
James A. Hart, Ossining; second vice-president, C. A. Heuss, 
Yorktown Heights ; and secretary and treasurer, J. B. Sackett, 
Tarry town. 

The annual meeting of the Commercial Travelers' Auxiliary 
of the National Pharmaceutical Society was held at the new 
home of the society, 2320 Eighth avenue, Manhattan, on Jan- 
uary 16. Edward Schott was re-elected as president, Julius Eis- 
enstein was elected vice-president and Morris N. Feinberg secre- 
tary and treasurer. It was resolved that all monies received 
for initiation and dues in the auxiliary shall be donated to the 
National Pharmaceutical Society for propaganda work during 
191 1 . 

Announcement is made that the business heretofore carried 
on by Antoine Chiris has been incorporated and will be con- 
tinued under the name of the Antoine Chiris Company, with 
offices at 18 and 20 Piatt street, New York. C. G. Euler, presi- 
dent of the new company, has for many years had charge of the 
New York office of M. Chiris, and B. T. Bush, the vice- 
president of the corporation, has been associated with Mr. Euler. 
Both gentlemen are well and widely known in the wholesale 
drr.g and perfumery trade, and number among their personal 
friends many of the leaders in these trades throughout the 
United States. The company is launched under the most favor- 
able auspices. 

The members, girls as well as boys, of the famous "blizzard 
class," N. Y. C. P., '88, will celebrate the anniversary of their 
college examination, which occurred on blizzard day, March 12, 

Index 



1888, by an annual reunion and dinner at Terrace Garden, Fif- 
ty-eighth street, between Third and Lexington avenues, New 
York, on Monday evening, March 13, 1991, at 7 o'clock. Prof. 
Charles F. Chandler, whom the class presented with a silver cup 
at the testimonial dinner, and Charles W. Parsons, who in- 
structed the members in analytical chemistry, will be the guests 
of the evening. In order to complete arrangements, the members 
are urged to notify promptly Prof. George C. Diekman, 115 West 
Sixty-eighth street, New York, the secretary-treasurer of the 
"blizzard class," of their intention to attend. 

Twenty-six applications for membership were presented by 
the secretary, Thomas Lamb, at the last meeting of the Long 
Island Drug Club, which was held at the Kaiser Haus on Janu- 
ary 16, and favorably acted on. S. L. Nieir, as chairman of the 
entertainment committee, reported that the recent ball had been 
a big success socially, but that' the expenses had slightly exceeded 
the receipts. A vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Nieir. J. L. 
Lascoff, of the Board of Pharmacy, made a brief address, as did 
Otto Raubenheimer. Committee reports were presented by A. H. 
Higbie and S. Schoenfeld. The next meeting of the club will 
take place at the Kaiser Haus at 10 p. m. on February 20. 
At the January meeting of this association, which was held 
on January 9, President Wertheimer appointed chairmen of the 
committees as follows: On membership, S. L. Neier; on griev- 
ances, R. L. Medl ; on entertainment, S. Rubin ; on legislation, 
Emil C. Kauche ; on legal defence, Edwin Kleine ; on press, 
S. Schoenfeld. The president appointed a committee of five, 
with S. Schoenfeld as chairmen, to accept the invitation of the 
Alumni Association of the New York College of Pharmacy to 
attend a lecture at the college by Professor Vanderkleed, of 
Philadelphia, on January 11. 



DIED. 

Abbey. — In Dayton, Ohio, on Saturday, December 24, James 
Abbey, aged eighty-two years. 

Allen. — In Canajoharie, N. Y., on Thursday, January 12, 
William F. Allen, aged forty years. 

Ball.- — In Holyoke, Mass., on Monday, January 2, Charles E. 
Ball, aged fifty-nine years. 

Bagg. — In Springfield, Mass., on Sunday, January r, George 
Bagg, aged seventy-nine years. 

Bowman. — In Pine Plains. N. Y., on Saturday, January 7, 
Jacob S. Bowman, aged sixty-eight years. 

Coulter, — In McDonald, Pa., on Sunday, January 1, Philip L. 
Coulter, aged forty-six years. 

Craig.— In Knoxville, Tenn., on Sunday, December 25, W. H. 
Craig. 

Cutts. — In Brooklyn, N. Y., on Wednesday, January 4, Fos- 
well C. Cutts, aged sixty-eight years. 

Ei.well. — In Bridgcton, N. J., on Tuesday, January 3. Albert 
S. Elwell, aged fifty-seven years. 

Fienup. — In St. Louis, Mo., on Saturday, December 31, Dr. 
T. F. Fienup, aged thirty-eight years. 

Greene. — In Chicago, 111., on Friday, December 30, Frederick 
J. Greene, aged fifty-six years. 

Greiner. — In Paris, Tex., Gotjlieb O. Greiner, eighty-three 
years. 

Guy. — In Middlctown, Conn., on Tuesday, January 3, William 
Baldwin Guy, aged sixty-two years. 

Horton. — In Rahway, N. J., on Saturday, January 7, Richard 

Horton. 

Kline. — In Shenandoah, Pa., on Saturday, January 7, John C 
Kline, aged forty-three years. 

Leavenworth. — In Waterbury. Conn., on Friday, January 6, 
Elisha Leavenworth, aged ninety-seven years. 

Lord. — In Boston, Mass., on Monday, January 2, Samuel L. 
Lord, aged sixty-nine years. 

ge 58. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



53 



Pettit. — In Louisville, Ky., on Tuesday, January 3, Charles 
H. Pettit, aged seventy-four years. 

Phillips. — In Frankton, Ind., on Wednesday, December 28, 
Ernest Phillips. 

Pottle. — In Andover, Mass., on Tuesday, January 3, Herbert 
E. Pottle, aged thirty-five. 

Rynard. — In Philadelphia, Pa., on Monday, January 1, Charles 
W. Rynard. 

Scheller.— In Chambersburg, Pa., on Sunday, January 1, 
Thomas K. Scheller, aged seventy-two years. 

Stewart. — In Prince Albert. Sask., Canada, on Wednesday, 
January 4, James Stewart, aged eighty-five years. 

White. — In Jersey City, N. J., on Friday, January 6, Thomas 
White, aged fifty years. 



P. A. R. D. POSTPONES CONSIDERATION OF AFFILIA- 
TION WITH N. A. R. D. 



Christopher Koch Elected President— Motion for Reaffiliation 
Tabled for Thirty Days Pending Investigation Now in 
Progress — Most Successful Year in the History of the Of 
ganization —Telephone Matter Discussed —Record Voting, 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 
Philadelphia, January 19. — No decision was reached on the 
matter of reaffiliation between the National Association of Retail 
Druggists and the Philadelphia Association of Retail Druggists 
at the annual meeting of the latter organization, at the Drug 

Club, on the evening of Janu- 
ary 6. It was decided to lay 
the matter on the table for 
thirty days, pending the out- 
come of an "investigation" 
which is now in progress. It is 
understood that this means that 
some of the statements, said to 
have been made during the past 
year when the local association 
was independent of the national 
body, will be explained and 
probably retracted. 

The Largest Meeting. 

This issue and the fact that 
officers were to be elected re- 
sulted in one of the largest 
meetings in the history of the 
organization. The matter of 
reaffiliation was brought to an 
issue when Charles King moved 
to renew relations tor the year 
191 1. Charles Rehfuss amend- 
ed this motion by suggesting 
postponement of final action for 
thirty days, explaining that at a conference between about fifteen 
members, some of whom had been for and others against 
reaffiliation a year ago, the course of postponing final action had 
been deemed the wisest one. He declared that it was the ulti- 
mate object of all who participated in the conference to bring 
about closer relations between the national and the local associa- 
tions; still it was decided inadvisable to act hastily. The amend- 
ment was accepted and the motion carried. A few voted against 
it with the idea of having a more detailed account of the reasons 
for the investigation. The dues for the year were again placed 
at $12. During 1910 each member received a rebate of $4, as no 
money was paid into the national treasury, but this year, with 
reaffiliation a probability, it is likely that there will be no rebate. 

No Contest for Officers. 

contests of any moment and the election 
: President, Christopher Koch; first vice- 




CHRISTOPHER KOCH, 
New president of the P. A. R. 



D. 



president, William E. Lee; second vice-president, David J. 
Reese; third vice-president, Morris Herson ; recording secretary, 

N. A. Cozens ; financial secretary, 
Carl W. Shull ; treasurer, George 
W. Fehr; chairman of the execu- 
tive committee, William A. Car- 
penter. The following members 
of the executive committee, one 
from each of the fourteen dis- 
tricts of the city, were elected : 
Frederick R. Keller, W. E. Cline, 
H. L. Hetrick, Dr. J. F. Meade, 
W. H. Umstead, George T. Lam- 
bert, A. G. Keller, Charles Lee- 
dom, David H. Ross, H. A. Kal- 
bach, M. D. Allen, R. T. Black- 
wood, J. C. Peacock and C. F. 
Schmickle. 




WILLIAM A. CARPENTER. 
Chairman Executive Committee, 
P. A. R. D. 



There were no 
resulted as follows 



The Most Successful Year. 

W. T. Burke, the retiring presi- 
dent, made a report of excep- 
tional interest, showing that the 
past year has been the most successful in the history of the 
organization. The other officers also reviewed the work of their 
departments. F. M. Apple, the retiring chairman of the ethical 
preparations committee, emphasized the importance of work 
along that line by a summary of the excellent work done during 
his administration and of the good that had been accomplished. 
David J. Reese, chairman of the telephone committee, brought 
his report right up to the minute by discussing issues that have 
only cropped up recently and on which action was required. One 
of these was the objection which the retail druggists of the city 
feel to the course of one of the telephone companies in allowing 
one of the largest department stores in the city to advertise a 
system of reverse calls to its patrons by which the public can 
call the store without putting a coin in the 'phone box in the 
retail drug store. Consequently, under this arrangement, the 
retail druggist is receiving no commissions on calls of this char- 
acter. Final action was not taken, pending the report of the 
company in question as to the number of such calls that were 
being made in the course of thirty days. 

Telephone Tolls. 

Another new issue, reported by Mr. Reese, was that of the 
offer of a telegraph company which seeks to have the druggist 
act as its agent for the receiving and distribution of messages 
at a commission of 10 per cent, on tolls collected and the return 
of the nickels spent in 'phoning messages received to the nearest 
telegraph station. Some of those present stated that they had 
rceived from another company as high as 25 per cent, commis- 
sion and had not undertaken to do more than receive such mes- 
sages and 'phone them in. But the sentiment seemed to be 
against assuming the responsibility of delivering telegraph mes- 
sages for such a meagre remuneration, and the matter was 
referred to a special committee, consisting of the members of the 
telephone committee and Frank W. Fluck and Charles Rehfuss. 
Following the installation of officers, an elaborate luncheon was 
served in the club cafe. 

A Perfect Score — Lacking One. 

Dr. Thomas T. Eckman, an active member of the Drug Club, 
512 Arch street, this city, and president of the Eckman Manu- 
facturing Company, Sixth and Market streets, probably estab- 
lished a world's record yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon, when, 
in a bowling contest with several other members on the club 
alleys, he rolled 299, lacking only one pin of a perfect score. Dr. 
Eckman's performance is all the more remarkable when the fact 
that he is sixty-four years of age is considered. But age rests 
lightly upon the shoulders of the well known physician, for he is 
a weekly participant in the weekly bowling matches of the Phila- 
delphia Wholesale Drug Bowling League. 



Index page 59. 



54 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



MARYLAND LAW OPPOSED BY ICE CREAM MAKERS. 



Seven Plead Guilty Under Food and Drugs Act. 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 
' Baltimore, January 26.— Last Saturday, seven pleas of guilty 
to charges of misbranding or adulteration were entered in the 
United States District Court, before Judge Rose, who imposed 
fines of $5 to $25. 1 The largest amount was imposed upon John 
B. Hurft & Son, wholesale druggists, and on the Indian Tar 
Balsam Company. They were charged with shipping from Balti- 
more to Washington, on June 8 last, one dozen Indian Tar 
Balsam, which was deemed misbranded because it did not bear 
a statement on the label's of the quantity and proportion of opium 
in the mixture, and also because of statements on the label that 
the compound was a never failing remedy for all kinds of lung 
affections; that it was without a peer as a cure of all forms of 
throat and lung diseases, arid that one dose would remove a 
sudden case of croup. A fine of $10 was imposed upon Muth 
Bros. & Co. for shipping to Norfolk, Va., February 11, 1910, 
three pounds of a drug sold as pink root which was not of 
standard strength, quality or purity. 



BIO PROPAGANDA GATHERING IN CINCINNATI. 



Eminent Pharmacists Present from All Over the Union — N. A. 
R. D. Officials Attend. 



(From our Regular Correspondent.) 

Cincinnati, Ohio, January 20. — The beginning of a campaign 
for a more general use of standard pharmaceutical products, 
which is likely to spread throughout the country, was launched 
in this city Wednesday evening, January 18, at a dinner in honor 
of the medical profession tendered by the druggists of Cincin- 
nati. More than 500 guests were entertained, and preparations 
have been on for several weeks to start the movement under 
auspicious surroundings. Leading medical men of Cincinnati 
and the Ohio valley have become interested and the proposition 
is being enthusiastically supported. 

"Probably no advanced country of the world has given less at- 
teniion to true pharmacy than has the United States, and, while 
we may boast of some of the world's greatest pharmacists, the 
exponent of correct pharmcy in general meets with indifferent 
success," said E. H. Thiesing, druggist at Gilbert avenue and 
Lincoln avenue, a member of the Executive Committee of the 
National Retail Druggists' Association, discussing the movement. 
"This has resulted in the use of secret nostrums, claimed by their 
manufacturers to have all sorts of superior virtues, but which 
very frequently are a positive fraud. Fancy prices are charged 
for preparations without known or real medicinal value. It is 
therefore a cause for congratulation that the leading medical 
men of Cincinnati and the Ohio valley are becoming interested 
in the movement, for its success rests largely with them." 

Present at the banquet were twenty-five of the most promi- 
nent pharmacists of the country. The speakers representing the 
pharmaceutical profession were : Dr. James H. Beal, chairman 
of the Board of Trustees of the United States Pharmacopoeia ; 
Dr. William C. Anderson, dean of the Brooklyn College of Phar- 
macy; W. S. Elkin, of the Atlanta College of Pharmacy, and 
Fred W. Kisker, of the Cincinnati Druggists' Association. The 
speakers representing the medical profession were Dr. Frederick 
Torchheimer, Dr. C. A. L. Reed and Dr. Charles L. Bonifield, all 
■of Cincinnati. 



Professor Oldberg, of the Northwestern University, the son 
•of Prof. Oscar Oldberg. who is so well known to pharmacists, 
is a composer of the first rank. His sonata, dedicated to Mrs. 
Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler. was given by Mrs. Zeisler at a piano 
recital in New York on January 6. 



A STATEMENT FROM THE MUNYON COMPANY. 



Homoeopathic Remedies Cannot Be Analysed— Technical Plea of 
Guilty of Misbranding. 

In the United States District Court, at Philadelphia, the Mun- 
yon Homoeopathic Home Remedy Company recently pleaded 
guilty to the charge of misbranding by the use of the word 
"cure" in three cases, and a fine of $200 was imposed in each 
case. 

Dr. Munyon writes us regarding these cases as follows : 

"I notice that some of the druggists' journals have printed a 
garbled account of the recent hearing in the United States courts 
regarding our remedies, which is very unfair. This report was 
given out evidently by some disgruntled reporter, who was care- 
ful to withhold the more important facts and only sent out that 
portion that would lead the public to believe that our remedies 
were little more than cane sugar. Knowing your journal to be 
eminently fair, I desire to place the following facts before you : 

"From the very inception of this business, all our medicines 
have been labeled and branded as 'Cure,' and, as we had our 
trade marks registered, thought we were fully justified in con- 
tinuing their use. Greatly to our astonishment we were in- 
formed by the Government that we were violating the pure food 
law. I made several trips to Washington to confer with Dr. 
Wiley upon the subject, and he assured me that we had violated 
the food and drugs act according to the Government's interpre- 
tation, and that they had in every instance convicted people for 
similar offenses. I immediately sent out letters to the trade, 
asking them to return all the goods they had on hand that were 
labeled as cures. I also put about twenty men on the road col- 
lecting these goods and replacing same with goods that con- 
formed to the pure food requirements. The total cost of this 
so far has amounted to between $30,000 and $40,000. There has 
never been a question about the efficacy of our remedies, and 
the charge preferred against us by the Government was simply 
for misbranding. 

"We have never had any other wish than to conform to the 
requirements of the food and drugs act, and after my conversa- 
tion with Dr. Wiley I admitted to the court that, according to 
the ruling of the Board of Food and Drug Inspection, our reme- 
dies were misbranded. So little importance did I attach to this 
case that I was not even present in the court room and had no 
witnesses there when the case was called, for I was under the 
impression that the court would see that we were innocent of 
any intended violation of the law and that the case would be at 
once dismissed. But instead of this the Government presented 
a chemist from Tennessee, who admitted that he had never ex- 
amined any other homoeopathic remedies. They also offered 
a homoeopathic physician as a witness, who testified that no 
homoeopathic remedies could be analyzed. There was no 
evidence offered to show that our remedies were not 
properly medicated according to the homoeopathic system. 
Had 1 known that the question of the medicinal virtues of our 
remedies would come up even incidentally I would have had 
present a number of chemists and a score of eminent homoeo- 
pathic physicians to prove that Munyon's homoeopathic remedies 
are medicated according to the highest laws of homoeopathy; 
that they are the product of regular graduated physicians, and 
have been passed upon and approved by leading homoeopathic 
specialists. I could have offered thousands of testimonials from 
people who have been cured by these remedies, as they are 
known and endorsed in nearly every civilized land, having had 
probably a larger sale than any other known remedies. It is 
preposterous to presume that this company, which has been 
established for more than twenty years and has employed skilled 
chemists and reputable physicians in the laboratory from its very 
beginning, would offer to the public unmeditated pellets. If my 
remedies contain no remedial value, then Hahnemann's system 
is wrong, all homoeopathic medicines are a fake, and every 
homoeopathic physician is obtaining money under false pretenses." 



Index page 60. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



55 



THE DRUG AND CHEMICAL MARKET 

The prioes quoted in this report are those current irv the wholesale market, and higher prices are paid for 
retail lots. The quality of goods frequently necessitates a. wide range of prices. 



Condition of Trade. 

New York, January 21, 191 1. 
There is yet an absence of important demand in the general 
market for drugs and chemicals, and comparatively few new de- 
velopments or changes are to be noted. Orders are coming in 
more freely from interior points, however, and the tendency gen- 
erally is in sellers' favor, though competition in some lines has 
served to weaken values, as in the case of opium, which is lower, 
with glycerin, ipecac and cubeb berries, to name a few of the 
leading staples. In sympathy with the increased cost of spice, 
oil of cloves is fractionally higher, and scarcity of Carthagena 
ipecac has hardened the views of holders. Menthol has met with 
an active inquiry and prices are generally higher. Early in the 
interval extreme price advances were reported on ergot from 
Hamburg, but as we go to press new advices are much lower 
and we hear of sales on spot in instances at a fractional decline 
from our quotations. A lower range prevails for the finer grades 
of cacao butter, and among the seeds decorticated cardamoms are 
easier, but star anise is held with increased firmness. Nearly all 
the cheap parcels of Valencia saffron having been cleaned up, 
prices were advanced last week and sales are making at quota- 
tions. Oil of peppermint has developed increased strength, west- 
ern holders being reluctant sellers at quoted prices, and only 
limited supplies are available on spot at the inside prices. 
Among other notable fluctuations during the interval are higher 
prices for acetphenetidin and cocaine, both advances being at- 
tributed to the higher cost of crude material. Other price re- 
visions are commented on in succeeding paragraphs, and the list 
is tabulated below, as follows : 

HIGHER. LOWER. 
Acetphenetidin, Balsam fir, Oregon, 

Althea root, cut, Balsam Peru, 

Arrowroot, St. Vincent,. Cardamoms, decorticated, 

Balsam copaiba, Calendula flowers. 

Buchu leaves, short, Crude paraffin, 

Cantharides, Cubeb berries, 

Cocaine, Gambier, 
Colocynth pulp, Glycerin, 
Elecampane root, Guarana, 
Ergot, Ipecac, 
Lavender flowers, Opium, 
Linseed oil, Rape seed. 

Menthol. Snake root. 

Naphthalene, 
Oil of cloves, 
Oil of peppermint. 
Oil of turpentine, 
Rochelle salt, 
Seidlitz mixture. 
Saffron, Spanish, 
Tahiti vanilla beans. 

Drugs. 

Acetphenetidin was advanced on the 10th inst, and the re- 
vised quotations of manufacturers now range from 82^ to 90c, 
the inside figure being for 500 lb. lots. 

Arnica flowers continue to offer at 10 to nj^c, but sales are 
confined for the most part to small jobbing parcels. 

Arrowroot, St. Vincent, is scarce on spot, and holders have 
advanced quotations to the range of 6 to 6^c. 

Balsams. — Copaiba is not urged in excess of trade require- 
ments, stocks being light, and prices are maintained firmly at an 
advance to 40 to 42c for South American and 50 to 52^c for 
Para. Fir, Canada, is dull and easy, with sales of barrels re- 
ported recently at $4.40; Oregon is fractionally lower, holders 
being willing sellers at 85 to 90c. Peru is offered more freely 
and at lower prices, cases having changed hands during the in- 

//) (/in- 



terval at $1.60 to $1.80. Tolu is quiet but firm at 20 to 21c, sup- 
plies being not over abundant. 

Barks. — Condurango has been in moderate request and we hear 
of sales in original packages at 10c. Buckthorn is finding a mod- 
erate consuming outlet with the sales at 4% to 4}ic Prickly ash 
is in light supply and holders are firm in their views at 55 to 75c, 
according to seller. Bayberry remains quiet, but values appear 
well sustained at 5 to 6c. Cascara has developed no action of 
consequence either as regards price or demand and 8^2 to 9^c 
is yet named for two and three year old bark. Cottonroot is less 
actively inquired for, but quotations are maintained firmly at 14 
to 18c. White pine and wild cherry are meeting with about the 
usual seasonable inquiry at previous prices, or say, 4V2 to 5c and 
6 to 9c, respectively. 

Bay laurel leaves have passed out into consuming channels in 
fair lots since our last and quotations are well sustained at 3% 
to 3V2C, some large sales being reported at the outside figure. 

Buchu leaves, short, continue on the upward grade in primary 
markets and spot values appear well sustained at $1 to $1.20 as 
to holder. There are intimations that the present high prices 
will not last long, unless the crop should turn out short. 

Cacao butter continues in demand at unchanged prices ; stocks 
are fairly liberal in quantity and sales are making at 34 to 36c 
for bulk and 36 to 40c for wrapped fingers. 

Calendula flowers have weakened since our last and holders 
of German offer more freely at 24 to 25c. 

Cantharides, Russian, are firmer and dealers quote 72 to 75c 
for whole and 75 '.o 77c for powdered. Chinese blistering beetles 
do not vary from 30 to 35c. 

Cannabis indica is passing out to the trade in small quantities, 
with prime East Indian bringing $1.25. 

Cassia buds are in moderate consumptive demand only, but 
holders offer with reserve, in the face of slight scarcity, at an 
advance to 23 to 24c. 

Coca leaves, Truxillo, show a hardening tendency influenced 
by stock depletion, and recent sales were at 30 to 35c as to 
quality and quantity. Huanuco are held and selling at 40 to 45c. 

Cocaine has advanced in price in consequence of the higher 
markets for crude, and the revised quotations of manufacturers 
are on the basis of $3.55 to $3.75 for bulk, as to quantity, an ad- 
vance of 20c per ounce. 

Codliver oil, Norwegian, is finding about the usual seasonable 
demand and quotations are maintained firmly at $33 to $36. 

Colocynth pulp is in advancing tendency in foreign markets. 
London cabling an advance of 2d. per lb., but on spot sales of 
U. S. P. are making at 22 to 25c. 

Cubeb berries are held with increased firmness in view of the 
limited available spot supply, xx being marked up to 44 to 46c 
and powdered to 46 inside. 

Damiana leaves continue inquired for, and the demand is met 
at 35 to 40c. 

Elder flowers continue in good demand and we hear of nu- 
merous sales at the quoted range of 16 to 17c. 

Ergot has lost some of the firmness which characterized the 
market at the beginning of the month, and while sales are re- 
ported at $1.15 to $1.25, there are intimations that less might be 
done on a firm bid. 

Glycerin reflects the influence of competition among holders, 
and C. P. is obtainable at 25 to 26c in drums, according to quan- 
tity. 

Goose grease has been arriving in fair quantity and supplies 
are offering in 5 lb. cans at 30 to 35c, while 35 to 40c is named 
for lesser quantities. 

page 61. 



56 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Grindelia robusta is passing out freely in a small jobbing way 
and quotations are maintained at 14 to 16c. 

Guarana, in the absence of important demand, shows an 
easier tendency, and the revised quotations are $2.15 to $2.20. 

Haarlem oil is passing out quite actively to the trade, and the 
market is firmer, with nothing offering at under $2.35. 

Lavender flowers, select, are in light supply and wanted, with 
nothing offering at under 16 to 20c as to quantity and quality. 

Lycopodium has been more actively inquired for and the 
sales during the interval were at an advance to 48 to 50c. 

Manna is attracting increased attention owing to reports of 
advancing markets abroad ; the lay down cost of small flake has 
already advanced to S$%c, but on spot 52 to 55c can yet be done. 

Menthol shows increasing strength; after sales at $3.50 to 
$375 early in the interval, holders generally advanced their quo- 
tations to $3.75 to $3 90; stocks are limited in all quarters and 
forward shipments are reported sold at full prices. 

Mullen flowers have been inquired for to some extent during 
the interval and we hear of some sales at 65c. 

Nux vomica is held at full recent prices in consequence of 
stock depletion, but supplies are yet obtainable at 2 l / 2 to 3c. 

Olive oil, green, is in advancing tendency abroad, and spot 
quotations are well maintained a; the range of $1.25 to $1.30; 
yellow is held and selling at $1.35 to $1.40. 

Opium has developed a weaker tendency during the interval 
in consequence of lack of important demand, the article being 
taken in a jobbing way only, or for small consuming accounts. 
Under pressure to realize on the part of holders the price of 
cases dropped to $4.70 and broken lots have sold at $4.75 ; pow- 
dered and granular share the weakness of the gum and offerings 
are made at $6.40 to $6.45. 

Parathn, crude, is a shade easier, supplies being offered more 
freely at a decline to 2> l /% to 2> l A> as to quantity. 

Quinine has been only in moderate demand for the past week 
or so and the market is dull and spiritless, with leading domestic 
makers continuing to fill orders on the basis of 14c for bulk in 
100 oz. tins. 

Saffron Spanish is in advancing tendency in consequence of 
the firm tenor of advices in primary markets and nothing is now 
available on spot at under $10.50, with up to $11 named as to 
holder. In broken lots American is selling at 20c. 

Senna leaves, of the various grades, have not changed ma- 
terially during the interval, and picked whole are maintained at 
21 to 22c; sittings do not .vary from 7^2 to 8c. 

Sugar of milk is held with increased firmness, though quota- 
tions are unchanged at the previous range of g l / 2 to 10c. 

Vanilla beans, Tahiti, are scarce and wanted, and holders gen- 
erally ask at an advance to $2. 

Vanilla beans, Mexican, are easier, whole offering in instances 
at $3, though up to $4.75 is yet named for the choice grades. 
Cuts are in rather limited supply and offer with reserve at an 
advance to $2.37^ to $2.50. Bourbons have eased off to the 
range of $3 to $3.75. 

Venice turpentine is not inquired for to any extent, but quota- 
tions appear well sustained at 32 to 34c. 

Wax, Brazil, is in improved demand and all grades are firmer 
and fractionally higher. No. 1 is quoted at 55 to 56c ; No. 2, 45 
to 46c; No. 3, 33'/£ to 34c, and North Country at 33 to 34c. 

Yerba santa is in good seasonable demand and quotations are 
steadily maintained at the range of 14 to 15c. 

Chemicals. 

Acetic acid has not varied during the interval and the recent 
revision to a lower range does not appear to have materially in- 
creased consumption. We quote U. S. P., 36 percent, at $4 to 
$4.90; in carboys 28 percent, is quoted at $1.95 to $2 as to quan- 
tity. 

Amyl acetate has further advanced since our last, the in- 
creased cost of crude influencing manufacturers to revise quota- 
tions to the higher range of $1.65 to $1.80 as to quantity. 

Arsenic is dull at the moment, only small sales being reported 
at 2.20c. for white and 6}4c for red. 



Bleaching powder continues in moderately active demand and 
quotations are maintained at 1.30c, though 1.25c is named as 
acceptable in some quarters. 

Blue vitriol is maintained firmly despite the weakness in cop- 
per and the demand, which is of fair average proportions, is 
being met at 4 to 4^c. 

Chlorate of potash has developed no new feature of conse- 
quence either as regards price or demand and the range for 
crystals and powders remains at 9% to g%c and g l / 2 to g^c re- 
spectively. 

Cream of tartar is held at the previous range of 26% to 26^ 
for crystals and 26I/2 to 27c for powdered, though the sales are 
chiefly in a jobbing way. 

Naphthalene continues in demand and flake and ball are both 
quoted at 2j4c inside. 

Nitrate of soda is maintained in firmer position at an advance 
to $2.20 to $2.22^ for 96 percent, and $2.i2 l / 2 to $2.20 for 95 
percent., as to quantity, in carload lots. 

Nitrite of soda is likely to go higher, as the article is no 
longer obtained as a by-product in the manufacture of litharge: 
meanwhile spot quotations have been advanced to the range of 
6>8 to 7%c. 

Oxalic acid is easy in tone with sellers at 7*4c and a moderate 
demand is reported. 

Potassium permanganate is in moderate request and quota- 
tions are maintained at the recent advance to iofy to 11 54c. 

Quicksilver is reported scarce on spot, but quotations are 
nominally unchanged, the previous low range of 57J/2 to 58c 
holding good as to quantity. 

Rochelle salt has been further advanced since our last and 
manufacturers now quote at the revised range of 19 to I9i4c 
for powdered, the inside figure being for 5 bbl. lots. 

Saltpetre, crude, is maintained with increased firmness in the 
face of slight scarcity and quotations show an advance to 4V2 to 
4^4c ; refined is held and selling at 4^4 to 6%c. 

Seidlitz mixture is higher in sympathy with Rochelle salt and 
15H to 16c is now the quotation of manufacturers. 

Tartaric acid is taken with some reserve at the recent advance 
in price and we hear of jobbing sales only at 29*4 to 2gV 2 z for 
crystals and 29^2 to 30c for powdered, as to quantity and seller. 

Gums. 

Aloes, Curacao, is in small supply and pretty closely concen- 
trated, with quotations marked up to 6% to 7c. 

Arabic sorts remain as previously quoted, with trading wholly 
in the way of jobbing quantities, and 10c is maintained for amber 
grades. 

Asafcetida is held at full recent limits, but the demand is 
without improvement, buyers operating only to the extent of 
immediate requirements. As to grade and test the range is $1-75 
to $3, the outside figure being for powdered. 

Benzoin is in improved demand and prices on Siam are main- 
tained firmly at $1.10 to $1.15. 

Camphor has shown a rather quiet condition during the inter- 
val, but owing to delays in deliveries holders maintain firm views, 
42c being quoted steadily for American and foreign in cases. 

Guaiac is in moderate request only, but the market appears 
well sustained at 20c for U. S. P. quality. 

Tragacanth continues in demand and the market is firmly 
maintained at the range of 77 to 78c for Aleppo firsts and 55 to 
65c for seconds; Turkey firsts and seconds are held and selling 
at 75 to 80c and 40 to 50c, respectively. 

Essential Oils. 

Important developments have been lacking in the essential oil 
market during the period under review. Cloves reflect the ad- 
vancing tendency in spice and holders generally name at an 
advance to $1.05 to $1.10 for bulk and $1.05 to $1.0714 for bottles. 
Peppermint is maintained in very firm position owing to the re- 
luctance of western holders to sell at present prices and cases 
have sold during the interval at $2.80, though in a 'limited way, 



Index page 62. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



57 





ONE YAHB 



MOIST 

| Parke Davis s Co- 

. Ottroit.Mich..U s A . a 






I'z INCH 



PREPAREO BY ,|«| 

Safe R Co.,Detrott.»dL°S 

~^MBjgg»TH£ rOQp AND Q9U6SACTJU^g--* 





[©IKE SAB' 

MOIST 

Parke Davis sCo 

-p:-0«troit.Micti„U.3.* < -jj 
"gft c-o, unpeg T»<f roop *bo ",f^2^^^B 





fl/f YARDS INCH 

SKm «U WITH A I iCOO *»• 





These gauzes and tapes have made a 
pronounced hit with physicians. 

We are pushing them in a hundred med- 
ical and surgical journals in January. 

Pharmacists who have not already done 
so will do well to order the full line at once. 



CHLORETONE GAUZE 

One square yard and five square yards, in 
glass jars. 

FORMIDINE GAUZE 

One square yard and five square yards, in glass 
jars and in paper cartons. 

FORMIDINE TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

ADRENALIN TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

PLAIN TAPE 

One-half inch wide, ten yards long, in glass 
jars; one and one-half inches wide, five yards 
long, in glass jars. 

ANESTHONE TAPE 

One-half inch wide, two and one-half yards 
long, in glass vials. 



Parke, Davis & Co, 

Home Offices and Laboratories, 
DETROIT. MICHIGAN. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



5* 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



$2.75 might yet be done. It is said that some inquiry has developed 
for Japanese oil, which is offering at $2 or a shade under. Mes- 
sina essences are held with increased firmness in the face of 
stronger advices from primary points, but quotations do not vary 
from $3.90 to $4 for bergamot, 85 to 90c for lemon and $2.20 to 
$2.30 for sweet orange; some spot scarcity has developed for 
bergamot. 

Roots. 

Althea, cut, is scarce and wanted and the limited available 
supply, which is closely concentrated, is held at 23 to 25c ; par- 
cels to arrive are quoted at 23c. 

Burdock is irregular and unsettled, but most holders quote 14 
to 15c. 

Echinacea is in better supply and offerings are freer at the 
range of 40 to 45c. 

Elecampane is in light supply and wanted ; after sales at 10c 
the quotation was advanced to 12c. 

Golden seal is maintained firmly in the face of diminishing 
spot supplies, and nothing offers at under $2.75. 

Hellebore, white, powdered, is held with increased firmness, 
owing to a shortage of whole, and quotations have been ad- 
vanced to 7 to 8c. 

Ipecac, Carthagena, powdered, is in limited supply at the 
moment, and holders offer sparingly at $2.40; whole is held and 
selling at $2.15 to $2.25. 

Jalap has sold freely in a jobbing way during the interval and 
quotations are nominally unchanged, though the range is rather 
wide, 25 to 30c being quoted as to test. 

Kava kava is without actual change of importance, but the 
market appears steady, with up to 50c named for small parcels. 

Senega and serpentaria are maintained steadily at 44 to 45c, 
but demand is inconsequential at the moment. 

Seeds. 

There have been few new developments of interest in the 
market for druggists' seeds during the period under review. 
Celery is in advancing tendency abroad, and the import cost is 
up to i8]4c, though sales on spot are making at 18 to i8^2C. 
Fcenugreek has sold freely during the interval and quotations are 
maintained at 2V2 to 3c. Rape has receded since our last and is 
now obtainable at zVa to 4^c. Decorticated cardamoms offer 
more freely, and supplies are available at 65c. Star anise is 
firmer at igJ/2 to 20^c. Natural coriander, old crop, are held and 
selling at 4^ to 5c, but supplies are almost exhausted. Worm- 
seed, Levant, continues held and selling at 13 to 15c; reports 
from primary sources are of weaker tenor. Larkspur continues 
scarce and quotations are firmly maintained at 55 to 60c. 



Quotations on Salvarsan. 

Several readers have made inquiries regarding the trade prices 
on salvarsan, Ehrlich's new remedy for syphilis. The substance 
is marketed in ampuls containing 6 decigrammes each (9 grains) 
by Victor Koechl & Co., 122 Hudson street, New York, and the 

wholesale price is $2.50 an ampul. 



Prepare for the Soda Season. 

When the time comes to sell cold soda water — and that time 
is near at hand — the new soda fountain should be in place and 
in working order. The way to get it in place is to order now. 
The special offer of spring dating on soda fountains installed 
now which is made on pages 11 to 14 of this issue of the Amer- 
ican Druggist enables the druggist to install his fountain now, 
get the benefit of the winter dispensing, and still not have to 
worry about payments until well on with his spring trade. Full 
particulars regarding this plan can be obtained by sending the 
coupon on page 11 to the Liquid Carbonic Company, of Chicago. 



At Factory Prices. 

Druggists can buy inlaid linoleum, an ideal floor covering for 
drug stores, offices, direct at factory prices, from Fenimore & 
Co., Trenton, N. J. Send a diagram of the floor space and they 
will be glad to submit estimate of cost and designs. 



A Lifelike Stage Picture of a Druggist. 

W'inchcll Smith in The Fortune Hunter, now playing at the 
Grand Opera House, has given us a kindly, true and lifelike 
picture of the old fashioned country drug store and country 
druggist, one who is intelligent, competent, kind and thoroughly 
lovable, if somewhat unthrifty and indigent. The modern touch 
is injected in the person of the fortune hunter, who, innocent 
of any knowledge of drugs or drug stores, gaily enters into the 
discharge of his duties as clerk, betraying his ignorance at every 
step, but winning friends by his grace, his good nature, and his 
unfailing courtesy. It is, however, the simple, lovable old drug- 
gist who appeals to us as a fine type of a man who has done so 
much for pharmacy and so little for himself. 



Ink Suitable for Pharmacists. 

Prof. Wilbur L. Scoville, in an article on inks published in 
the American- Druggist for January 25, 1909, says: "The only 
ink that is suitable for the pharmacist, that won't spread all over 
the label with the first, wetting, or disappear entirely when an. 
alkali mixture is allowed to run over it, is a tannin-iron ink." 
The ink which exactly meets these requirements is the Electro- 
Chemical Blue Black Writing Fluid of Thaddeus David- Com- 
pany, of New York. Write this firm for their special free show 
case offer. 



Three Months Service Free. 

By filling out the coupon on page 5 and sending to the L. A. 
Becker Company, Chicago, you will be able to learn something 
which will be to your advantage as a soda water dispenser. By 
placing an order now the druggist can get three months' service 
practically free. The Becker iceless fountains have many advan- 
tages which should be carefully studied by every soda water 
dispenser. 



A Salesman Who Works Without Salary. 

Every druggist who sells cigars is expected to furnish free 
matches. This amounts in the course of a year to $5 or $10, 
which can be converted into a source of profit by the installation 
of the match machine of the International Vending Company, 
Department A, Chicago. Write them for quotations and descrip- 
tive matter mentioned in the American Druggist. 



Periodicals Pay. 

Periodicals pay as a side line both directly and indirectly. 
Nothing is quite such a magnet to draw the people into the drug 
store as a line of periodicals. Nothing is more sure to attract 
attention than the display of periodicals. The modern periodical, 
ivitfc its beautifully illustrated covers, furnishes in itself one of 
the most attractive displays which can be presented. The Amer- 
ican News Company have for years made a special feature of 
starting druggists in the business of carrying a side line of 
periodicals. They will be glad to furnish full particulars, offer 
suggestions, outline methods of advertising, and do everything 
except the actual retail selling, which will insure the dealer mak- 
ing a success of his venture. Write the American News Com- 
pany, 9 Park Place, New York, for catalogues and suggestions 
about this line of work. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



59 



BUY A GROSS 



AND SAVE 5 

and 2% PER CENT. 



THE KIND YOU 
HAVE ALWAYS 
HANDLED 




IT PAYS 
TO HANDLE 
RELIABLE GOODS 



$33.60 Per Gross 



Jobbers Sell In Gross Lots, 
5 Per Cent, and ZU Per Cent. OFF. 



$2.80 Per Dozen 



THIS IS THE GENUINE 

No. 2320 Guaranteed Under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906 

Send for Cards, Cut Outs and Counter Wrappers. 

THE CENTAUR COMPANY, ^ - 

77 Murray Street, New York City. CJZiSt/jffieUtjteAi President. 

BUY A GROSS * ND S «V 5 PER CENT 

Who can't sell 12 dozen per annum ? 

Specify MERCK'S 



on your orders for 



CODEINE SULPHATE 

because MERCK'S dissolves almost instantly 



UOUNG SSMYUE'S 
* fURE 





Stick Licorice. 



Also the delicious 

y f®. s 

LICORICE 
CHEWING GUM 



Specify y CSL on your 
order for 

STICK LICORICE 

M & R WAFERS 

in 5c. muslin bags 

ACME PELLETS and 
LICORICE LOZENGES 

in attractive 5 lb. tins 

NATIONAL LICORICE CO., 106 John Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Powdered Extract 

and 
Powdered 
Licorice Root 

in convenient packages for 
the trade 



Kindly mention AM ERIC/IN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



// should be understood that the prices quoted in this column are strictly those current in the wholesale drug market, 
and that higher prices are paid for retail lots. The quality of goods frequently necessitates a considerable range of prices. 



Drugs, Chemicals, &c. 



Acetanilid lb. 

Acetone lb. 

Acetpbenetldln (O. S. 

P. phenaeetin ) ... lb. 
Add: Acetic Com'l.lb. 
U. S. P. 30 p. c. 
Acetic, Glacial .... 

Benzoic, Ger lb. 

Eng. ...oz. 

Boric, Cryst lb. 

*' powd. . . .lb. 
Carbol, cryst., blk. lb. 

lb. bottle lb. 

Chrysopbanlc '• 

Citric, dom lb. 

Gallic lb. 

Muriatic, C. P...lb. 

Nitric, C. P lb. 

Oxalic lb. 

Phosphoric lb. 

Picric lb. 

Pyrogalllc lb. 

Salicylic lb. 

Stearic lb. 

Sulphuric, 98%... lb. 
Tartaric, crystals.lb. 

powdered lb. 

Tannic, U. S. P. .lb. 

Agar Agar 

Alcohol, U.S. P., grain 

Wood, 95% 

Denatured, 188 pf.bbl. 

half-bbl. 

Alota lb. 

Alum, Lump ..100 1b. 

Ground 100 lb. 

Amnion, carb 

" bromide, blk. 
iodide, ..blk. 
Arrowroot, Bermuda. lb. 
St. Vincent in bbl.lb. 

Arsenic. Red lb. 

White Ib. 

Balm of Gilead Buds.lb. 
Balsam Copaiba, South 

Amer lb. 

Para lb. 

Fir, Canada ...gal. 
Fir, Oregon ....gal. 

Peru 

Tolu lb. 

Bark, Angostura ...lb. 

Buckthorn lb. 

Cascara Sagrada..lb. 

Cascarllla lb. 

Condurango 

Cotton root lb. 

Cramp lb. 

Elm, select lb. 

Pine, white lb. 

Prickly Ash 

Sassafras lb. 

Soap — whole lb. 

Cut 

Crushed lb. 

White Pine lb. 

Wild Cherry lb. 

Bay Rum 

Bismuth, citrate lb. 

" amnion, clt.lb. 
" salicylate ..lb. 
" subnlt. ...blk. 

subcarb. ...lb. 
" subgallate. .lb. 
" subslodlde .... 
Bleaching Powder, Eng. 

Blue Vitriol 1 10 ■•. 

Borax, powdereu. . .10. 

Crystals lb. 

Brimstone, crude.. ton. '. 
Bromine, bulk ....lb. 
Burgundy Pitch ...lb. 

Cacao Butter, blk 

" " 12 lb. boxes. 

Caffeine lb. 

Calcium hypophosph.lb. 
Cantharides, Chlnese.lb. 

powdered 

Russian, whole... lb. 

powdered 

Cassia Buds lb. 

Castor Oil, No.l, bbl.lb. 
Caustic Soda... 100 lb. 

Chalk, preclp lb. 

Chloral Hydrate, crys- 
tals, bulk lb. 

Crusts, blk lb. 

Chloroform, bulk ..lb. 
Clnehonldlne Sulph.oz. 
Cocaine, Muriate ..oz. 

Codelnv, Sulph oz. 

Cod Liver Oil, Norweg. 

Newfoundland ..bbl. 
Colocynth, Trieste.. lb. 

Pulp 

Spanish lb. 

Copperas 100 lbs. 

Creosote, Beech wood.. 
Cream Tartar, powd. lb. 
Cubeb Berries, xx.lb. 

Powdered lb. 

Cuttle Bone, Trleste.lb. 

French lb. 

Jewelers', large.. lti. 
" small.. Hi. 

Dextrin lb. 

Dragon's BI'd, lump. lb. 

reeds lb. 

Bpsom Salts ...bags. 

Barrels 

Ergot. Russian lb. 

Spanish lb. 

■ther 1900 Ih. 

Washed lb. 

O. S. P 18S0 lb. 



.78 
.78 
.35 



FIomits, Arnica. ... Hi. .Iliu>01 

Calendula lb. .24 @ 

Chamomile, Romanlb. .19 ® 

German © 

Hungarian ....lb. .15 ® 

Elder 10 <fi 

insoet Powder . . .lb. .30 © 

Lavfiid.T lb. .07 <<t 

Select lb. .16 @ 

Rose lb. .60 @ 

Saffron, Amer.... lb. .19 O 
Valencia. lb. 10.50 

Formaldehyde lb. .08%® 

Glycerin, C.P.drms.lb. .25 @ 

cans lb. .26 @ 

Grains of Paradise. lb. .25 © 

Guarana lb. 2.15 © 

Gums: Aloes, Cape 08%® 

" Curacoa 07%© 

in gourds 10 © 

" Socotrine. .lb. .22 © 
Arnbic, 1st pkd..lb. .25 © 
2d pkd. . .lb. .19 @ 

" sorts lb. .10 ® 

Asafoetlda lb. 1.75 ® 

Benzoin, Sumatra. lb. .30 
1.10 
.42 
.42 



.11 
.25 
.23 
.35 
.24 
.18 
.50 
.09 



.20 
.65 
.20 
@11.00 
.10 



.27 
2.20 
.09 
.07% 
.11 
.24 
.35 
.23 
.10% 



Slam lb. 

Camphor, refi'd...lb. 

Foreign lb. 

Chicle lb. .48 

Gamboge lb. .65 

Gualac lb. .26 

Kino lb. .25 

Mastic lb. .46 

Myrrb lb. .15 

Select 18 

Ollbanum, sifts.. .lb. .05 

Sandarac lb. .15 

Senegal, pkd. ...lb. .11 
Tragacanth, Alep.lst .77 
" " 2d .55 

Turkey. 1st .75 
2d .40 

Haarlem Oil ....gross 2.25 

Ichthyol lb. 4.00 

Indigo lb. .90 

Iodine, resub 2.60 



Iodoform lb. 2.95 

Iron, citrate, D.S.P.lb. .49 

" and amnion, clt.lb. .46 
and ammon. citrate 

(green scales) . . . .56 
and quinine citrate. lb. 1.18 
phosphate, scales. lb. .46 ® 
pyrophosph. scales.lb. .46 @ 
quinine and strych- 
nine citrate ...lb. 1.78 @ 

Isinglass, Amer lb. .72 ® 

Russian lb. 2.75 ® 

Juniper Berries ...lb. .02%® 

Leaves, Aconite 07%® 



® .35 
® 1.25 
© .43% 
<§ .45 
® .50 
© .70 
© .30 
® .30 
<§ .48 
© .18 
® .25 
© .06 
@ .17 
@ .13 
@ .80 
@ .65 
@ .80 
© .50 
@ 2.40 
© 4.25 
® 1.25 
@ 2.65 
<§ 3.00 



1.28 



Althen 

Belladonna lb. 

Buchu, short lb. 

" long ...,1b. 
Cannabis Indica .lb. 



Coca, 



. .lb. 

. .lb. 
...lb. 
. . . lb. 



Truxillo 
Huanuco 

Damlana 

Digitalis 

Euphorbia pil 
Grindelia robusta.lb. 

Horehound lb. 

Hyoscyamus lb. 

Jaborandl lb. 

Matlco lb. 

Plchi 

Pulsatilla lb. 

Rose, Red lb. 

Senna, pkd. whole. lb. 
Alexandria, Nat. lb. 
gar. and sifted, lb. 

Tlnnevelly lb. 

Alexandria, sift. lb. 



Stramonium 

Thyme 

Uva ursl 

Yerba Santa 
Licorice — mass 
Spanish 



...lb. 

.'.lb. 
..lb. 
..lb. 
..lb. 



Imp'ted mass, Span- 
ish lb. 

Stick, Calabria ..lb. 

Domestic lb. 

Llthla, carbonate. . .lb. 

" citrate lb. 

Lupulln, Ger lb. 

Lycopodlum lb. 

Maguesla, carb lb. 

Manna, large flk...lb. 

Small flake lb. 

Menthol, Japanese, .lb. 
Mercurials (50 lb. lots) 

Blue Pill lb. 

Calomel lb. 

Corr. Sublim. ...lb. 
Merc, and Chalk. lb. 

Ointment 

Red Preclp lb. 

White " lb. 

Morphine, bulk .oz. 

Eighths oz. 

Moss, Iceland lb. 

Irish, bleached ..lb. 
Naphthalene, flake.. lb. 

Ball lb. 

Nui Vomica .... .lb. 

Ol. Anise lb. 

Almond, bit.. Eng. lb. 
Sweet, true ...lb. 
bit., artificial, .lb. 
peach kernels .... 

Bay 

Bergamot 

Cajuput 



.05 
.16%® 
1.00 @ 
.50 © 
1.23 @ 
.30 @ 
.40 @ 
... ® 
.14 @ 
... © 
.15 ® 
.07 @ 
.08%® 
.10 @ 
.15 @ 
.18 @ 
.07 @ 
.60 ® 
.21 @ 
.08 @ 
.15 @ 
.06%® 
.07%® 
.08 @ 
.03%® 
.03%® 
.14 @ 
.10 @ 
.16%® 



1.88 

.75 
3.00 

.03 

.08 

.05% 

.18% 
1.20 

.55 
1.25 

.35 

.45 

.35 

.15 

.30 

.08 
.09 
.11 
.16 
.20 
.08 
.65 
.22 
.09 
.16 
.12 
.08 
.09 
.04 
.04 
.15 
.12 
.20 



.18 

.25 

.10% 

.65 

.90 

.18 

.43 

• 05% 



.24 
.28 
• 20% 
.66 
1.10 
.25 
.45 
.07 
© 1.00 



.51 




.55 


3.65 


® 


3.75 


.38 


© 


.40 


.81 


1 


.85 


.72 


© 


.76 


.38 


© 


.41 


.44 


I 


.46 


.92 


I 


.06 


.99 


ii 


1.01 


3.10 


© 


3.20 


3.35 


1 
I 


3.45 


.05 


.06 



Camphor 

Ca raway 

Cassia . 
U. S. 



P. 



. .lb. 
...lb. 
...lb. 
. . .lb. 
...lb. 
. . lb. 



.07%® 

.iw,® 

.02%® 

.02%® 
1.20 © 
3.25 

.55 

.45 

.25 
1.90 
3.00 

.50 

.08% 

.95 

.75 
1.20 



.08 



.03 
1.22% 
© 4.75 
® .60 
© .85 
© -27% 
® 2.25 
© 4.00 
® .55 
© .09% 
® 1.00 
® .80 
® 1.25 



Oils — ( onfd. 
Cedar, pure 

red 

Citronella . 
Cloves, bud 
Copaiba . . . 
Coriander . 
Croton .... 

Cubeb 

Eucalyptus 
Geranium 
Lavender, 
Lemon ... 
Lemongrass 
Linaloe . . 
Linseed 

boiled . . 
Mustard . . 
Myrbane . . 
Neroll . . . 
Nutmeg 



lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

. . ... . . lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

flowers, lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 



.75 
.15 
.24 

1.05 
1.15 
5.25 
.65 
3.75 
.40 
3.50 
1.85 
.80 
1.40 
2.85 
.90 
.91 
3.00 



@ 



lb 

lb. 

lb. 50.00 

.lb. .70 



Olive 3.50 



.80 
.17 
.25% 
1.10 
1.20 
5.75 
.70 
© 4.00 
© .60 
© 4.00 
© 2.25 
© .85 
@ 1.50 
@ 3.00 
@ .91 
@ .92 
@ 4.00 
.06%® .07 
©70.00 
® .80 
® 4.00 
@ 2.35 
@ 2.50 
@ .22 
® 1.60 
© 2.50 
© 3.00 
@ 5.00 
© 2.50 
@ 1.90 
® 6.76 
62%® .80 
3.00 ® 3.25 

82% 



Santonin, powdered. lb. 11.10 ©11.25 
San Palmetto IWrrb-». 

lb. ... @ .10 



2.20 
2.35 
.18 
1.20 
2.40 
2.75 
4.75 
2.10 
1.80 
6.50 



Orange, sweet ..lb. 
Orange, bitter ..lb. 

Origanum lb. 

Pennyroyal lb. 

Peppermint, tins . . 

" cases.. 
Petit, grain, French. lb. 
" So. Amer. lb. 

Pimento lb. 

Rose oz. 

Rosemary lb. 

Sandalwood lb. 

Sassafras lb. .80 

Artiflcial.lb. .27 © .29 

Safrol lb. .38 © .40 

Spearmint lb. 3.00 @ 3.10 

Tansy lb. 2.00 @ 2.25 

Thyme lb. 1.00 © 1.20 

Wintergreen, leaf.lb. 4.25 @ 4.50 

Artificial lb. .33 ® .35 

Sweet Birch ...lb. 1.50 ® 1.65 

Wood (Chinese) . .lb. .07%® ... 

Wormseed lb. 4.50 @ ... 

Wormwood lb. 7.00 ® 7.50 

Opium, Nat — cases.. lb. 4.70 © 4.75 

Jobbing 4.75 © 4.80 

" Powdered ..lb. 6.50 © 6.55 

Orange peel, bit... lb. .03 @ .04 

Sweet lb. .04%® .10 

Petrolatum 03 @ .08 

Phenolphthaleln ...lb. 1.45 



Podophyllln 3.25 



3.50 

Potassium acetate.. lb. .17 @ .18 

bicarbonate 07%@ .08% 

bichromate 07% @ .07% 

bromide, gran 25 @ .26 

cryst 27 @ .28 

chlorate, cryst 08% @ .09% 

powd 08%® .09% 

cyanide 20 @ .21 

hypophosphite 65 @ .69 

iodide, bulk 2.10 @ 2.15 

permanganate ...lb. .10 @ .10% 

Prickly Ash Berries. . .25 @ .30 

Quicksilver, flask... lb. .58 @ .60 

Quinine, bulk oz. .14 © ... 

German oz. .14 @ 

German, outside, .oz. ... @ 
Java oz. .13%® 

Rochelle Salts Ib. .18 @ 

Root, Aconite lb. .10 @ 

Alkanet lb. .06 @ 

Althea, cut lb. .23 ® 

Arnica lb. .35 © 

Belladonna lb. .12 @ 

Blood 08 ® 

Calamus lb. .07 @ 

Calamus. bl'ch'd..lb. .23 @ 

Oalumba lb. .10 @ 

Colchicum lb. .11 ® 

Dandelion, Ger... lb. .08%® 

Doggrass 05% @ 

Elecampane 12 @ 

Galangal lb. .04 @ 

Gentian lb. .04%® 

Ginger, Ja., bled. lb. .16 ® 
unbleached ....lb. 

Ginseng Ib. 

Golden Seal lb. 

Hellebore, pwd...lb. 

Helonlas lb. 

Ipecac, Rio lb. 

Carthagena .... lb. 

Jalap lb. 

Kava Kava 

Licorice, ord. ...lb. 

Select lb. 

Lovage lb. 

Mandrakp lb. 

Musk, Russian. . .lb. 



Orris, Florentine. .lb 
Orris, Verona . . . Ib 
Pariera Brava ...lb. 

Pink lb. 

Rhatany lb. 

Rhubarb, Canton .. 

Shensi 

high dried 

clippings 

Sars'p'la, Hond...lb. 

Mexican lb. 

Senega lb. 

Serpentarla lb. 

Snake. Canada... lb. 

Squill lb. 

Stllllngla lb. 

Valerian, Belg lb. 

German lb. 

English lb. 

Saccharin lb. 

Sal Ammoniac, lump. lb. 

Granulated lb. 

Salol lb. 

Saltpetre, crude lb. 

Refined lb 



.11 

fi.50 
2.75 
.07 
.30 
2.20 
2.00 
.28 

!6i 
.07% 
.65 
.06 
.06 
.10 
.09 
.38 
.30 
°3 



.14 
.13% 
• 18% 
.10% 
.06% 
.25 
.40 
.14 
.09 
.08 
.25 
.12 
.12 
.09 
.06 

.05 

.05 
.18 

@ .14 
® 7.50 



® 



® 

.37%® 
...2%® 
.15 © 
.15 © 
.29 ® 
.09 
.44 
.45 
.15 



® .07% 
© .35 
© 2.30 
© 2.05 
.30 
.50 
• 04% 
.12 
.7.'. 
.07 
.06% 
.11 
.10 
.40 
.35 
.28 
.40 
.60 
.15% 
.30 
.31 
09% 
.46 



© 



© 

.03%© 
.06 © 
.07%® 
■ 12 © 
.25 © 
1.25 © 1.50 
.09%© .09% 
.06%© 
.88 ® 
.04%® 
.05 



.30 
.04 
.07 
.08 
.15 
.30 



.06% 
.90 
.01 
0 



Santonin, crystals, .lb. 10.90 ©11.05 



Seed, Anise, 
German 
Star . . . 

Canary . . . 

Caraway . 

Cardamom, 



Ital. 



.lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

blchd . . . 
Decort.lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

lb. 

Ib. 

lb. 

..lb. 



Celery .... 
Cevadilla 
Colchicum 
Coriander 

Bleached 
Cummin . 

Fennel, Ger lb. 

Italian ..lb. .08% 

Flax, whole bbl. 10.28 

ground Ib. .05% 

Fenugreek lb. ,02M 

Hemp, Russian. ..lb. .03^ 

Larkspur lb. .55 

Millet, nat lb. .02 

" shelled ..lb. .04 V 
Mustard, Cal. yel.lb. 

Cal. brown lb. .06} 

German, yellow. lb. .04^ 

German, brown. lb. .04$ 

Bari, brown lb. .07 

Sicily, brown... lb. .07* 

Poppy, blue lb. .07 

Quince, Ger lb. .60 

Rape, Ger lb. .04 

Eng lb. .04} 

Stavesacre lb. .15 

Strophanthus Hlspidus, 

lb. .48 

Kombe lb. .48 

Sunflower lb. .04} 

Wormseed, Amer. lb. .07 

" Levant.lb. .13 

Seidlltz mixture. .. .lb. . 14 J 

Silver nitrate oz. .35} 

Soap, Castile, whlte.lb. .11} 

" green lb. .09} 

mottled lb. .08} 

Sodium bicarb., Eng., 

100 lbs. .02? 

domestic ..100 1b. 1.50 

benzoate lb. .26 

brom., blk lb. .27 

carb., cryst. .100 lb. 1.60 

citrate lb. 

hypophosphite 65 

iodide 2.45 



!6t 

■05% 

.05 

.07* 

.07% 

.07% 

.78 

• 04% 

• 04% 
.16 



nitrate 
phosphate 
salicylate 
sulphate . 
Spermaceti 



. . .Ib. 
. . .lb. 
. ..lb. 
. .lb. 
...lb. 
..gal. 
.lb. 



.70 
10 
10 



.60 ® 
.09%® 
.09%® 

1.85 ® 2.15 

2.20 ® 2.00 

2.00 © 2.40 

.25 ® .30 

18 U© .22 

"@ 1.60 

© 3.00 



3.75 



© 

04%© 

© 



3.25 
2.25 
3.00 



.lb. 

lb. .02 

lb. .32 

.100 lb. .60 

lb. .30 

Spts. ether, nit 42 

Strontium nitrate. ..Ib. .07% 

Strychnine oz 

Sugar of Milk 
Sugar of Lead . 
Sulphur, roll . . 
" flowers 
" flour . 
Tar, Barbadoes. 
Tartar Emetic 

Thymol 1.40 

Thymol iodide 2.90 

Tonka Beans, Para. lb. 1.75 
" Angostura ..lb. 
Surinam ...lb. 

Turmeric 

Turpentine gal. 

Vanilla Beans ....lb. 

Cut, Mex..lb. 
" South Am.... 

" Tahiti lb. 

Bourbon 3.25 

Vanillin oz. .33 

Venice turpentine. . .lb. .32 

Artificial 

Wax, Bayberry lb. 

" Bees, ord.... lb. 

sel ...lb. 
white lb. 
Brazil, North 

Country .lb. 
Brazil, No. 1.1b. 

No. 2.1b. 
No. 3.1b. 
" Ceresin, vel. .lb. 

whlte.lb. 

" Japan lb. 

" Paraflln lb. 

Zinc Oxide Ib. 



Spices. 

Cassia. Batavla lb. .17 ® 

Batavla, No. 2 12 © 

China Cases 09%® 

broken 07%® 

Saigon rolls 42 © 

buds 22 ® 

Chillies, Japan 12%® 

Mombassa 12 © 

Cinnamon, Ceylon 20 ® 

Cloves, Amboyna 18 © 

Zanzibar 15 © 

Ginger, Cochin 11%® 

Africa, No. 1 11%® 

Japan 10%© 

Mace, Banda, No. 1.. .65 © 

Penang, No. 1 54 © 

Penang, No. 2 52 ® 

Nutmegs, 105s to 110s .11%© 

Paprika, Hungarian .. .18 ® 

Pepper, Aeheen 07%© 

Lampong 07%® 

Singapore 08%® 

white 14%© 

Telllcherry 09 © 

Pimento 04 © 



44 



4.00 



.08 
.86 
© 5.00 
® 2.50 
© 3.75 
@ 2.00 
© 3.75 
35 




.17% 
.13 

:8* 

.48 

.23 

.18* 

.12% 

.21 

.18% 

.16 

.12 

.11* 

.10* 

.68 

.65 

.83 

.11* 

.28 

.07% 

.07* 

.08% 

.14* 

.09% 

.04% 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



61 



New Remedies Compendium and Prices Current. 



In this list, which is intended for the 
of no iynmediate use to the dispenser 
the market, and the list tlius kept fu 



use of dispensing druggists, and not for analytical chemists, chemical formulas, melting points and other dai* 
are omitted. While additions will be made from time to lime as new remedies make their appearance on 
lly up to date, remedies falling into disuse will be dropped as expediency may determine. 



ACETOZONE. (Benzoyl-acetyl 
peroxide.) White powder, mixed 
with an equal weight of an inert 
soluble powder; soluble in water 
(1:1000). Bactericide; used in- 
ternally and externally in diseases 
of germ origin. Dose, i to 3 
grains in solution. Boxes con- 
taining 6 vials of 15 grains each, 
per box, $1.25; '/i oz. bot., $1.40; 
Yt oz. bot., $2.70; 1 02. bot.. $5. 25 
(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

ACET-THEOCIN-SODIUM. White 
crystalline powder, readily soluble 
in water. Powerful diuretic; used 
in dropsy, in doses of 5 to 7 
grains, two to three times daily. 
V 2 and 1 oz. bot., $1.90 to $2.30 
per oz. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

ACOINE. (Dl-FARA-ANISYL-MONO- 
PHENETHYL GUANIDINE HYDRO- 
CHLORIDE.) White crystalline 
powder, soluble in 17 parts of 
water. Local anaesthetic like co- 
caine, used hypodermatically in 
eye surgery; dental anaesthetic in 
normal saline solution, 2 per cent. 
15 grain vials, each, 30c; cap- 
sules, 2Y2 grains, 28 in box.. 75c. 
(The Heyden Chemical Works.) 
ADNEPHRIN SOLUTION. A i-tooo 
solution of the active principle of 
the suprarenal gland in physio- 
logical salt solution containing 
one-half of 1 per cent, of metha 
form. Used chiefly as a haemos 
tatic, also for treatment of inflam 
mations, congestions and tumefac 
tions of the mucous membranes 
also as a cardiac stimulant. 1 oz 

vials 60c 

Emollient. Tubes, each 30c 

Oil Spray, i oz. vials, each.... 60c 
Suppositories, box of 12, each. 30c 
(Frederick Stearns & Co.) 



January 

ADRENALIN. Grayish-white pow- 
der; with difficulty soluble in 
water. The blood-pressure-raising 
principle of the suprarenal glands. 
1 grain vials 85c. 

Chloride Solution, 1:1000, a solu- 
tion of 1 part of adrenalin chlor- 
ide in 1000 parts of physiologic 
salt solution, with 0.5 percent, of 
chlortone. Powerful astringent, 
hemostatic and cardiac stimulant. 
Used for the control of hemor- 
rhages, internal and superficial, 
for the reduction of congestion 
and inflammation of mucous mem- 
branes, as a heart stimulant in 
collapse, and as an adjuvant to 
the local anaesthetic action of co- 
caine. Internal dose, 5 to 30 min- 
ims. 1 oz. bot 85c. 

Inhalant, i oz. bot 85c. 

Ointment, '/i oz. tubes 43c. 

Suppositories, boxes of 1 doz..3§c. 

Tablets, vials of 25 85c. 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

ADRIN. (Epinephrin hydrate.) 
Whitish nonhydroscopic powder; 
the active principle of the supra- 
renal gland. 1 grain vials, each, 
75c; 1-1000 solution, 1 oz. vials, 
each, 75c; in tubes of 12 tablets, 
each tablet q. s. to make 15 min- 
ims of 1-1000 solution, each, 40c; 
in ioo's, each $310 

Inhalant, i oz. vials 75c. 

Ointment, yi oz. tubes 40c. 

Suppositories, box of 1 doz. 30c. 

(H. K. Mulford Co.) 

AQURIN. (Acet-theobromine-so- 
dium.) White hygroscopic pow- 
der, soluble in water; incompatible 
with acids. Diuretic in dropsy. 
Dose, 7 to 15 grains, twice daily, 
Y and 1 oz. bot.... $1.55 to $1.70 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 



1911. 

AIROL. (Bismuth oxyiodogal- 
late.) Grayish-green powder, in- 
soluble in water or alcohol. On 
admixture with water airol partly 
decomposes and turns red. Should 
be mixed with water only with in- 
tervention of glycerin. Used ex- 
ternaly as application to wounds, 
burns, skin diseases, eye, nose, 
gonorrhoea, either pure, in 10 per- 
cent, suspension, equal parts glyc- 
erin and water, or 10 to 20 per- 
cent, ointment. 1 oz. cartons, 

(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

ALBARQIN. (Gelatose silver.) 
Light brown powder, readily sol- 
uble in water. Contains 15 per- 
cent of silver. For gonorrhoea a 
2 percent, solution is injected 4 
or 5 times daily. Tubes of 50 
tablets, 0.2 gm. each, per tube. 50c. 
(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

ALPHOZONE. (Succinic peroxide.) 
White fluffy powder, quickly sol- 
uble in 60 parts of water. Germi- 
cide and antiseptic, internally and 
externally. Dose, 3 to 5 grains. 
1 oz. bot., $3.00; Yi oz., $1.60; 
}4 oz., 85c; 1 grain tablets, bot. 

of 60 50c. 

(Frederick Stearns & Co.) 

ALYPIN. White crystalline pow- 
der, easily soluble in water and 
alcohol, but dissolving very spar- 
ingly in ether. Watery solutions 
have a neutral reaction and can 
be sterilized by boiling for a short 
period. Local anaesthetic, substi- 
tute for cocaine. The strength 
of the solutions ordinarily em- 
ployed varies from 1 to 5 and 
even up to 10 percent. It can be 
combined with adrenalin. Aly- 
pin should not be used in connec- 



tion with silver nitrate, owing te 
the formation of a precipitate. 
This, however, does not apply to 
alypin nitrate, which is perfectly 
compatible with silver nitrite. 
Alypin and alypin nitrate are sold 
as follows: 15 grain vials, each, 
20c. ; 10 grain vials, per vial, 16c; 
Y* and Yi oz. bots., per oz., $4-*»; 

1 oz. bots., per oz $4-** 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

ALUMNOL. (Aluminum naphtmoi 
disulphonate.) Whitish powder, 
very soluble in water; slightly 
soluble in alcohol and glyceric; 
astringent and antiseptic; dissolrei 
in pus and penetrates tissue*. 
Used in 1 percent solution ia 
gonorrhoea; 10 to 20 percent, mix- 
ture with talcum as a dusting 
powder. 1 oz. tins, per OZ..50C 
(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

AMINOFORM. (Hexamkthylemitb- 

tramine. ) White granular crys- 
tals, readily soluble in water, pre- 
pared by combining ammonia and 
formaldehyde. Antiseptic for urin- 
ary passages, diuretic and solvent 
in uric acid concretions; dose, f 
to 10 grains, well diluted, three 
times daily. 1 oz. bot., 60c; ?ft 

grain tablets, oz 70c 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 
ANAESTHESIN. White crystalline 
powder, almost insoluble in cold 
water, but easily soluble in ether, 
alcohol, benzin and fatlT efla. 
Local anaesthetic, and used inter- 
nally in gastric ulcer, nervous dys- 
pepsia, etc. Dose, internally, 5 te 
8 grains several times daily. Used 
externally pure or in ointment % 
to 20 percent, and in suppositor- 
ies containing 3 grains each. I 

oz. bot , $i.oe 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 



MARVEL 

"WHIRLING SPRAY" 



ING 





IT ISA 11 MARVEL 



WAS AWARDED THE GOLD MEDAL. DIPLOMA 
AND CERTIFICATE OF APPROBATION BY THE 
SOCIETE D' HYGIENE OF FRANCE, OCTOBER 
9th, 1902 

as the latest and best improvement in Vaginal 
Syringes. Particular attention is called to 
the tact that by reason ol its peculiar con- 
struction the Marvel Syringe dilates and 
flushes the vagina with a volume of whirling 
spray which smooths out the folds and per- 
mits the injection to come Into contact with 
the entire surface, instantly dissolving and 
washing out all secretions and discharges. 





FULLY PROTECTED BY PATENTS 
ALL JOBBERS SELL IT 



THE MARVEL CO. 

Sole Proprietors 
44 East 23rd Street - New York 

BRANCH OFFICES: 
Paris. Fiance ... 42 Rue du Marche 
London. England 11 Queen Vicloria Street 
Sydney, N.S.W.. Australia. 416 418 George St. 
Montreal. Can. - [Vat. Drug & them. Co. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers 



62 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



ANALOINE. A powder composed 
of ace tan il id, 50 parts; sodium bi- 
carb., s parts; sodium salicylate, 
5 parts; camphor monobrom., 5 
parts; caffeine cit rated, 2^ parts; 
ext. cannabis indica, 2Y2 parts; 
aromatic powder, q. s. 100 parts. 
Recommended as an analgetic, an- 
tipyretic and nerve sedative in 
neuralgia, migraine, headache, 
rheumatism, gout, sciatica, etc. 
Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 1 oz. screw 

cap bottles 40c 

(H. K. Mulford Company.) 

ANTHRASOL. Yellow, oily liquid, 
with a distinctive tarry odor; solu- 
ble in alcohol, acetone, fats and 
petrolatum. A distillate from coal 
tar, used in diseases of the skin 
where coal tar is employed. 1 oz. 

vials 5 SC. 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

ANTINONNIN. (Potassium ortho- 
diwitro-cresol.) Paste of bril- 
liant orange color, soluble in 
water, slight soapy odor, nonvola- 
tile. Deodorizer, disinfectant, pre- 
vents the growth of fungi, mildew 
and dry rot in cellars and human 
habitations. Used in form of so- 
lution. 1 lb. to 5 to 15 gallons of 
water. Cans, yi lb., $1.10 per 
lb.; 1 lb. cans, 95c; 50 lb. cans, 
per lb 77c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

ANTISCLEROSIN. Tablets, consist- 
ing of a compound of inorganic 
blood salts, used in treatment of 
arteriosclerosis and its sequele. 
Dose, a tablets three times daily. 
Carton of 4 tubes @ 24 tablets, 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

ANTITUSSIN. (Difluordi-phenyl 
ointment.) Ointment containing 
lanolin, 85 percent.; petrolatum, 
i* percent, and difluordiphenyl, 
5 percent. A whooping cough 
remedy applied as inunction to pa- 
tient's neck, chest and back once 



a day, in doses of 5- Gm. 20 Gm. 
collapsible tubes, 40c; 40 Gm. ,75c. 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

ANUSOL SUPPOSITORIES. A com- 
pound of bismuth iodoresorcin sul- 
phonate, used in haemorrhoids, etc. 
Dose, 1 or 2 daily. Box of 12, 

$1.0* 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

ARGENT AMINE. A colorless, al- 
kaline liquid representing a solu- 
tion of silver nitrate, 10 percent., 
and ethylenediamine, 10 percent.; 
soluble in water. Used in all 
cases where silver nitrate is used, 
mostly in gonorrhoea, in strength 
of 1 in 2000-4000 solution. 1 oz., 

g. s. bot 75c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

ARGONIN. White powder, very 
slightly soluble in cold, but freely 
so in hot water. A compound of 
silver nitrate and sodium casein. 
Antiseptic, germicide and gono- 
coccicide, less caustic than silver 
nitrate. Solutions of 2 to 10 per- 
cent, strength recommended for 
injection in gonorrhoea and 3 per- 
cent, solutions for use in the eye. 

1 oz. vials 65c. 

(Victor Koechl & Co) 

ARHOVIN, an addition product of 
diphenylamine and esterified thy- 
myl-benzoic acid, is a fluid of aro- 
matic odor and slightly burning 
taste, soluble in oil. Gonocide for 
internal and topical use. Given 
by mouth in capsules of 4 grains 
(1 or 2 capsules, three to six 
times daily) ; in urethral bougies 
(1 bougie, two to four times 
daily); in vaginal globules (1 
globule, two to four times daily), 
and injected in 2 percent, to 5 
percent, oily solution. 1 oz. vials, 
90c; box of 50 capsules, 65c; 
box of 12 bougies, 50c; box of 

12 globules 50c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 



ARISTOCH1N. (Carbonic acid ester 
of quinine.) White powder, taste- 
less, insoluble in water. Decom- 
poses in the system to yield 96.1 
percent, of quinine. Prescribed 
like quinine, but in somewhat 
larger doses. yi and 1 oz. car- 
tons, per oz $2.20 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Merck & Co.) 

ARSENFERRATOSE. A solution of 
ferratin in syrup form (syrupus 
ferratini arseniati); contains 0.3 
percent, of iron and 0.003 per- 
cent of arsenic. Used as a haema- 
topoietic and alterative, in doses 
of a tablespoonful three or four 
times a day for adults, and for 
children a teaspoonful to a des- 
sertspoonful. 250 Gm. bottles. 75c. 

Tablets, 4 grains, 50 in bot.... 40c. 
(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

ARSYLIN. (Arsenated phosphorus- 
albumin.) Yellowish-white pow- 
der; odorless; slightly acidulous 
in taste; absorbed only on reach- 
ing intestines. Contains 0.1 per- 
cent, arsenic acid and 2.6 percent, 
phosphorus. Prescribed as an al- 
terative and hsematinic in skin dis- 
eases, neuroses, etc. Dose, 10 to 
20 grains three times daily. 1 
oz. cartons, 75c; 4-grain tablets, 
80c. per 100. Must not be con- 
founded with arsinyl. 
(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

ASAPROL. (Abrastol.) Whitish 
powder, freely soluble in water 
and alcohol. It is the calcium 
salt of betanaphthol-sulphonic acid. 
Antipyretic and antirheumatic in 
doses of 5 to 15 grains. Used 
also as test for albumin in urine. 
1 oz. bot $1.25 

ASPIRIN. (Acetyl salicylic acid.) 
White crystalline powder, insolu- 
ble in water; incompatible with al- 
kalies. Used instead of the sali- 
cylates in articular and muscular 
rheumatism and other therapeutic 



indications for the salicylates. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains, three to 
five times daily. 1 oz. bot., per 

oz 33c. to 43c 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

ATOXYL. (Meta-arsenous anil- 
ide.) White powder, containing 
37.69 percent, of arsenic in or- 
ganic combination. Soluble in 6 
parts of water and used in this 
strength solution for hypodermic 
injection; relatively nontoxic, 
Dose, l /z to Yi of a grain. 1 oz. 

vials $3.o« 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

BENZONAPHTHOL. White, crystal- 
line powder, soluble in alcohol 
and chloroform; insoluble in wa- 
ter. Employed as intestinal anti- 
septic in doses of 5 to 15 grains. 
1 oz. vials, 22c. ; yi lb. bottles, 
$2.20; y t lb., $2.10; 1 ib. ...$a.oa 
(Schering & Glatz.) 

BENZOSOL. (Guaiacol benzoate.) 
Small colorless crystals, nearly 
insoluble in water. Contains 54 
percent, of guaiacol and, as it is 
slowly saponified by the gastric 
juice, the guaiacol being liberated 
gradually, it is recommended as 
an intestinal antiseptic and as an 
agreeable substitute for creosote 
in incipient phthisis. Dose, 4 to 

8 grains. 1 oz. tins $1.25 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

BETA - EUCAINE HYDROCHLOR- 
IDE. White, crystalline powder, 
soluble in 30 parts of water. A 
synthetic compound chemically al- 
lied to cocaine, being the hydro- 
chloride of benzoyl-vinyl-diaceton- 
alkamine. It is slower in action 
than cocaine, but anaesthesia is 
more prolonged, and a third less 
toxic. Used generally in 2 per- 
cent, solutions in dental and oph- 
thalmic work, yi oz. and yi oz., 
per oz., $3.60; yi oz. and 1 oz., 

$3-50 

(Schering & Glatz.) 



(16 





1 



Registered Trade Mark No. 54282 

CALCUTTA BRISTLES 



Do not confound this brush with ihe rub- 
back wire brushes. It is entirely 
ifferent. The " Ideal " has an Air- 
Cushiored Back and Genuine 
Calcutta Bristles. 
It is the best 
selling brush 




market 



Order through your jobber, wholesale drug or dry gocds 

HENRY L. HUGHES 

Manufacturer 

78 Monroe Street, American Express Building 
CHICAGO, ILL. 




The STANDARD 
PRESCRIPTION 
-CORKS- 



..OF. 



THE WORLD 




ARMSTRONG CORK OO. 



POPULAR FOR GENERATIONS 



C&Cor Black 

^ & CAPSULES 



(Reeistered in United States Patent Omce) 

oin-e of" the: oldest remedies eor 

Gonorrhoea, Gleet, etc., etc. 

"CAE SELES OE QUALITY 



PLANTEN'S 



CAPSULES 



Let us send you samples 

H. PLANTEN & SO IX 



Founded 1836 



Brookly n. M. Y. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST who* writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



6.3 



BETA-EUCA1NE LACTATE. While 
powder, possessing the same prop- 
erties as the hydrochloride, but 
is more soluble in water (about 
i in s). Prices and containers 
same as for beta-eucaine hydro- 
chloride. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

BISMUTH FORMIC IODIDE. Yel- 
lowish, impalpable powder dress- 
ing for burns. Dose, 1-16 to J4 
grain. 5 Gm. envelopes, each, 

$1.50 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

BORNYVAL. (Valerianic acid 
BOrNEOL ester; bornyl valer- 
ate.) A water-white aromatic 
liquid, soluble in alcohol and 
ether, but insoluble in water. 
Substitute for valerian in the treat- 
ment of nervous disorders, in 
doses of 4 minims. Vials con- 
taining each 25 capsules of 4 

minims 50c. 

(Riedel & Company, New York.) 

BROMETONE. Powder, slightly 
soluble in water. Compound of 
bromoform and acetone; recom- 
mended as a substitute for bro- 
mides; contains 77 percent, of 
bromine. Dose, 3 to 5 grains. 1 
oz. bot., 85c; s grain capsules in 

bot. of 100 $1-25 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

BROMIPIN. (10% Brominized 
sesame oil.) Yellow, oily fluid, 
used as a nervine and sedative in 
epilepsy; succedaneum for bro- 
mides. Dose, 1 teaspoonful. 1 
oz. vial, 18c. ; per lb., 

$2.10 to $2.35 
(Merck & Co.) 

BROM - PROTYLIN. (Bromated 
phosphorus-albumin.) Faint yel- 
low powder possessing a slight 
though characteristic bromine odor 
and taste. Contains 2.7 percent, 
phosphorus and 4 percent, bromine 
organically combined with albu- 
min. Employed as a nerve nu- 
trient and sedative in hysteria, 
epilepsy and other neuroses. Dose, 
is to 20 grains, 3 times daily. 
1 oz. cartons, 50c; 4-grain tab- 
lets, 100 55c. 

(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.; 



BROM URAL. (Alpha Monubkum I- 
suvalekylurea.) White, almost 
tasteless powder; readily soluble 
in hot water, ether, alcohol and 
alkaline solutions; sparingly solu- 
ble in cold water. Nerve sedative 
and mild soporific in doses of 
10 grains at bedtime. 1 oz. car- 
tons, $1.60; tablets of 5 grains 
each, tubes of 10, 25c; boxes of 
5 tubes, $1.45; bottles of 100 tab- 
lets, per 100 $2.00 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

BROVALOL. (Bromo - isovaleric 
acid borneolester.) Colorless 
oily liquid, soluble in organic sol- 
vents. Used as sedative and 
analeptic in all conditions of ner- 
vousness in doses of 5 to 10 drops 
several times daily. Box of 30 

pearles, Gm. 0.25 65c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

CALOMELOL OINTMENT. White 
mercurial ointment made from 
colloidal calomel for the inunc- 
tion treatment of syphilis and 
especially for the cure of its cu- 
taneous manifestations. 2 oz. 
graduated tubes, per tube.... 55c. 
(Heyden Chemical Works.) 

CALOMELOL POWDER. Grayish- 
white powder of neutral reaction, 
tasteless and odorless. Yields a 
milky solution when added to cold 
water in the proportion of 1 to 
50. Used as a dusting powder 
in the treatment of papular erup- 
tions and ulcerations, and as ex- 
ternal application to ulcerated 
chancres in 2 percent, solution. 

1 oz. vials 70c. 

(Heyden Chemical Works and 

Merck & Co.) 
CELLASIN. Brownish white amor- 
phous powder; odorless; soluble 
in water rendered alkaline. Is a 
carbohydrate and fat-splitting fer- 
ment, capable of decomposing 
3,000 times its weight of carbo- 
hydrates (sugar or starch), and 
of emulsifying and decomposing 
fats in an alkaline medium. Dose, 

2 to 14 grains, thrice daily after 
meals. Bottles of 200 seven-grain 
tablets, $3.00; do., y/ 2 grains, 

$2.00 

(Mead, Johnson & Co.) 



CEROLIN. Pills of a fatty substance 
isolated from yeast. Acts same 
as yeast in furunculosis, acne, 
etc., but more cathartic. Pills 
containing o. 1 Gm., box of 100, 

each 50c. 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

CHINOSOL. (Dioxychinolin Sul- 
phate, Neutral.) Bright yel- 
low crystalline powder readily 
soluble in water, but not in alco- 
hol, unless considerably diluted. 
Combines with oily or fatty bases 
when first rubbed up with a little 
water. Powerful antiseptic, ger- 
micide and disinfectant for both 
external and internal use. For 
ordinary uses the average strength 
of solution is 1:1000; as eye wash 
or nasal douche, 1:8000 to :iooo 
Internally in doses of 5 grains 
well diluted. Powder, 1 oz. pack- 
age, doz., $8.00; tablets of 16 
grains, wooden screw tubes, per 
tube of 16 tablets, 50c; per doz., 
$4.00; 8 tablets, 25c; per doz., 

$2.00 

(Parmele Pharmacal Company.) 

CWNAPHEN1N. (Quinine car- 
bonic ESTER OF PHENETIDINE.) 
White tasteless powder, represent- 
ing synthetic quinine-phenacetin 
and having medicinal properties of 
both. Insoluble in water, but 
easily soluble in alcohol, ether 
and chloroform. Dose, 5 to 10 
grains, thrice daily. y 2 and 1 oz, 
cartons, per oz $1.25 to $1.30 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

CHINOTROPINE. (Urotropine qvi- 
nate. ) A combination of quinic 
acid and urotropine (hexamethyl- 
enetetramine) used as uric acid 
solvent in the various manifesta- 
tions of the uric acid diathesis. 
Is said to liberate formaldehyde 
freely internally and to form solu- 
ble compounds with uric acid. 
Dose, 10 to 30 grains. J4 oz. 
and 1 oz. vials, $1.75; tablets, yYi 
grains, 25 in tube, 2 tubes in 

box $i-7 e 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

CHLORETONE. White crystals, 
slightly soluble in water (1:125); 
hypnotic, local anaesthetic and an- 
tiseptic. Dose, 5 to 20 grains, iD 
cachet, tablet or capsule. Exter- 



nally a dusting powder for 

wounds, combined 23 with, ziac 
oxide, 120, and Fr;nch chalk, os 
parts. }4 oz. vials, per oz., 90c. ; 

1 oz 85c. 

Capsules, 3 grs., bot. of 100.. 80c. 

5 grs., bot. of 100 $1-25 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

CHOLOOESTIN. A fluid prepara- 
tion of pleasant appearance and 
agreeable taste, miscible in all pro- 
portions with water. Each half 
ounce contains sodium glycocho- 
late, 2 grains; sodium salicylate, 
from oil of wintergreen, aji 
grains; pancreatin, 5 grains; so- 
dium bicarbonate, 5 grains; in u 
menstruum containing 15 percent, 
of alcohol. Recommended in 
treatment of intestinal putrefac- 
tion, catarrhal conditions of the 
biliary passages and constipation 
due to hepatic torpor. Dose, one 
tablespoonful, well diluted in wa- 
ter or other non-acid vehicle, 
thrice daily. 12 oz. bot, per 

doz $14 

(F. H. Strong Company.) 

CITARIN. (Sodium anhydro- 
methylencitrate.) White, crys- 
talline powder, easily soluble in 
water. Antilithaemic for gouty 
and chronic rheumatic conditions; 
liberates formaldehyde in the 
blood. Dose, 15 to 30 grains, 
thrice daily. 1 oz. bottle, per oz., 
70c. to 75c. 

COLLARGOL. (Colloidal silver.) 
Shining, black scales, soluble in 1 
in 20 of water. Used as a bac- 
tericide, 1 in 100 to 10,000 in 
water or glycerin. Internally a 
1 to 500 or 1 to 100 solution may 
be added to the food in teaspoon- 
ful doses. l /i oz. and 1 oz. vials, 
$2.75; tablets, 1 grain each, tubes 

of 50 60c 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

CORNUTOL. A concentrated prep- 
aration of ergot of rye, prepared 
for hypodermic and general use. 
Each Cc. represents 2^4 Gm. of 
assayed Spanish ergot. Dose, 
hypodermically, 5 to 10 min. (or 
0.3 to 2 Cc). By mouth, !• to 
30 min. (or 0.6 to 2 Cc.). Mar- 
keted only in 1 oz. vials and in 
hermetically sealed aseptic bul/.s, 



ft 

1 
1 



Secure this business for Your store 

The surest way of securing the future 
patronage of your baby food customers 
is to sell them 

Mellin's Food for the Baby. 

Babies fed on Mellin's Food will be 
healthy and happy and strong, and the 
satisfied parents will naturally come to 
your store again and again, not only for 
Mellin's Food, but for the many neces- 
saries for the comfort of their babies. 

Cultivate this class of patronage, for it 
means increased profits for you. Keep your stock well in view — display 
the advertising prominently — and always recommend Mellin's Food. 
It may be depended upon absolutely. 

Attractive advertising matter upon request. 
Mellin's Food Company, - Boston, Mass. 





Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertiser*. 



6 4 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



each bulb containing 2 Cc. (Yt 
dr.). 1 oz. vials, 50c; per pack- 
age of 6 bulbs 60c. 

(H. K. Mulford Company.) 

CORYFIN. (Ethylglycolic acid 

EST KB OF MENTHOL.) Limpid, COl- 

orless oil with faint menthol odor; 
soluble in alcohol, ether and 
chloroform. Used locally in nasal 
and pharyngeal catarrhs, head- 
aches, neuralgias, etc. Y2 oz. bot., 

$1.05 per oz.; 1 oz. bot $1.00 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

COTARNINE HYDROCHLORIDE. 

See Stypticin. 

CREOSOTAL. (Creosote cabbon- 
atc ) Yellow, transparent, vis- 
cous liquid, insoluble in water, 
but miscible with alcohol; con- 
tains 92 percent, of creosote com- 
bined with 8 percent, of carbon 
dioxide. Used in tuberculosis and 
pneumonia in doses of 5 to 60 
dreps several times daily. 1 oz. 
vials, 65c; !4 lb- bot., per lb., 
|9- 2 S; V* 1°., $9.10; 1 lb.... $9.0* 
(Sckering & Glatz and Farbenfab- 
riken of Elberfeld Co.) 

CUPROL. Green powder, readily 
soluble in water; a chemical com- 
bination of nucleinic acid and 
copper; solution does not coagu- 
late albumen. Applied locally as 
an astringent; of use in granular 
ophthalmia in the form of 5 per 
cent, instillations, or may be ap- 
plied in the dry form with a 
brush. Yi oz. vials, $1.30 per oz.; 

1 oz. vials $1.20 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

•ERMATOL. ( Bismuth subgal- 
late.) Yellow, insoluble powder; 
Bsnirritant antiseptic, especially 
serviceable in burns, ulcers and 
moist eczema. Used internally in 
diarrhoea, dysentery, intestinal 
fermentation and gastric ulcers, 
in doses of 10 to 30 grains three 
times daily. 1 oz. tins, 19c; 1 

lb $2.50 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 



DIATHESIN. White crystalline leaf- 
lets, soluble in 15 parts cold 
water, freely soluble in hot water 
or alcohol. Is ortho-oxybenzyl- 
alcohol, or synthetic saligenin. 
Used in place of salicin in rheu- 
matism, neuralgia, pleurisy, etc, 
in doses of 754 to 15 grains. 1 

oz. cartons $2-4» 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

DIFLUORDIPHENYL. White crys- 
talline powder of pleasant aro- 
matic odor, insoluble in water, 
soluble in alcohol, ether, chloro- 
form and oils. Used as antisep- 
tic dusting powder mixed with 
talc in proportion of difluordi- 
phenyl, 10 parts; talc, 90 parts, 
or in 10 percent, ointment with 
lanolin as dressing for burns. 
Dose, 1-16 to Yi grain. 5 Gm. 

envelopes, each $i-5° 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

D1QALEN. (Cloetta's solubls 
digitoxin.) Marketed only in 
solution in 15 Cc. (Y2 oz.) vials, 
on account of infinitesimal dos- 
age. Active principle of digitalis 
leaves, nonaccumulative heart 
tonic and diuretic. 1 Cc. of solu- 
tion represents 0.0003 Gm. 
(0.0045 grain) of digitoxin, which 
is the average dose, by the mouth, 
hypodermatically, or by enema; in- 
travenous injections, of 1 Cc. (16 
min.), may be repeated at inter- 
vals of from J4 to 1 hour, as 

necessary. Y2 oz. vials 80c. 

(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

D1GITALIN VERUM. White powder, 
the active constituent of digitalis, 
free from impurities and noxious 
principles. Almost insoluble in 
water. Dose, 0.902 Gm. to 0.006 
Gm., three times daily, increasing 
to not over 0.02 Gm. (Yi grain). 

1 Gm. vials $7-25 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

DIONIN. (Ethyl morphine hy- 
drochloride.) White, crystalline 
powder, very soluble in water and 
alcohol. Recommended to replace 
codeine and morphine in bron- 



chitis, emphysema and asthma. 
I >ose, '/ 4 to Yi grain. 1 oz. vials, 
$6.00; J'» oz. vials, per oz., $6.25; 
15 grain vials, each, 35c; tablets, 
Yi grain, bot. of 50, 35c. ; bot. 

of 100 60c, 

(Merck & Co.) 

DILRET1N. White powder, soluble 
in water, decomposed by acids. 
Must be kept dry and air tight. 
It is a chemical compound of 
theobromine sodium and sodium 
salicylate. Diuretic, antiasthmatic 
and vascular stimulant. Dose, 15 
grains four to six times daily. 1 

oz. bot., per oz $1.75 

(Knoll & Co.) 

DORMIOL. (Amylene chloral.) 
Oily, colorless liquid, with a 
carr.phoraceous odor, insoluble in 
water, soluble in alcohol and 
ether. Hypnotic in mania; 50 
percent, solution supplied com- 
mercially. Dose, 5 to 60 minims. 
1 oz. vials, 28c; Y2 lb. bot., per 

lb $4.00 

(Merck & Co.) 

DUOTAL. (Guaiacol carbonate.) 
White crystalline powder, soluble 
in alcohol, insoluble in water. 
Same therapeutic action as creo- 
sotal, which see. Dose, 5 to 20 
grains, gradually increased. 1 oz. 
vials, $1.50; tablets, jYt grains, 50 
tablets in box, $1.50; nYi grains, 
50 tablets in box 90c. 

(Schering & Glatz and Farbenfab- 
riken of Elberfeld Co.) 

DLOTONOL. White powder; a mix- 
ture, equal parts of the lime and 
sodium glycerophosphates. Nerve 
nutrient in doses of 5 to 10 grains 
three times daily. 1 oz., 50c; 
1 lb., $6.00; tablets, 5 grains, 100 

tablets in bottle 65c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

DYMAL. (DlDYMIUM SALICYLATE.) 

Pinkish powder, odorless. Applied 
as powder and ointment in skin 
diseases, notably dry and weeping 
eczema. 1 oz. cartons, each, 35c. ; 

4 oz. cartons, each $1.20 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 



EKA-IODOFORM. A chemically 
pure iodoform prepared by elec- 
trical synthesis, and sterilized with 

paraform. 1 oz. vials 50c 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

EMPVROFORM. Brown powder; 
condensation product of birch tar 
and formaldehyde; insoluble in 
water, readily soluble in acetone, 
chloroform and solutions of caus- 
tic alkalies. Used like tar ia 
ointment, paste and tincture. 1 

oz. vials 65c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

EP1CARIN. (Condensation product 
of betanaphthol and cresolic 
acid.) Yellow-brownish powder, 
difficultly soluble in hot water, 
easily soluble in alcohol, ether 
and oils. Nontoxic substitute for 
naphthol in parasitic skin diseases. 
Employed chiefly in ointments (5 
to 10 percent.). 1 oz. cartons, 
per oz 60c. to 70c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

EUCASIN. Casein compound, con- 
taining 95 percent, albumin and 
5 percent, water. Prepared from 
cow's milk. Dietetic for conva- 
lescents, invalids or persons af- 
flicted with lung, stomach or kid- 
ney trouble; also in anaemia and 
typhoid. 1 lb. tins, $3.00; Y2 lb-, 

$1.50; Ya. lb 80c. 

(l'uerst Bros. & Co.) 

EUOALLOL. (Pyrogallol Mono- 
acetate.) Yellowish, syrupy 
liquid, marketed in 66 percent, 
acetone solution. Soluble in wa- 
ter and acetone; applied pure or 
diluted with acetone as paint in 
skin diseases, especially psoriasis, 
and deemed superior to pyrogallol. 

1 oz. vials $i.o* 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

EUMYDRIN. White crystalline pow- 
der, obtained from atropine; easily 
soluble in water. Powerful my- 
driatic, less poisonous than atro- 
pine. Dose, internally, about 1-64 
grain. 1 or 2 percent, solution 
dilates the pupil after 10 to 25 
minutes. 1 grain tubes, 45c. to 
55c. per box of 10 tubes; Yl oz. 
and Y2 oz. packages, per oz., 

$16.50 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 



1 oz. Powder $1.00 ip^i 

1 " 2 1-2 gr. Tablets 1.00 M P 
1 " 5 gr. Tablets 1.00 
1 " 5 gr. Pink Top Capsules 1.25 aIdependable analgesic 



GuHENALGIN 



For Trade Discounts, addre s 
THE ETNA CHEMICAL CO. 
313 West Street 
New York City 




# EUREKA «* 

Prescription Filing Cabinet 



WRITE FOR INFORMATION. 



E. B. READ &. SON CO., 



BALTIMORE, MO. 



DRUG LABELS — BOXES — PRINTED - LITHOGRAPHED 



| MACHINE CUT CORKS 



JUSTUS BRAUER & SON 

129 ARCH STREET 
Established 1865 PHILADELPHIA 



kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST zvhen writing to Advertisers. 



I 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



65 



EUNATROL. (Sodium acid oleate.) 
Light yellow substance, readily 
soluble in water and alcohol; 
supplied as powder and chocolate- 
coated pills. Recommended in 
treatment of gallstones, being ex- 
cellent cholagogue. Dose, four 
pills, 4 grains each, three times 
daily, or in solution, 25 Gm. 
bot., each, 75c; bot. of 50 pills, 

70c; 100 pills $1.30 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

EUPHORIN. (Phenol- urethane.) 
White, acicular crystals, slightly 
soluble in water, freely in alco- 
hol. Energetic antipyretic and 
analgetic in doses of 7Yt to 15 
grains, 2 to 3 times daily. 1 oz. 

vials $1.00 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

EUPHTHALMINE HYDROCHLOR- 
IDE. White crystals; a syn- 
thetic derivative of betaeucaine; 
soluble in water; 2 to 5 percent, 
solutions dilate the pupil, without 
causing discomfort or accommo- 
dation disturbances. y t and 1 

Gm. vials, per Gm $1.25 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

EUPYRINE. (Para-phenetidine va- 
nillin ETH YLCARBON ATE. ) Light 

yellow crystals, sparingly soluble 
in water, readily in alcohol, chlo- 
roform and ether. Stimulant anti- 
pyretic in doses of 754 to 15 
giains. 1 oz. cartons, each. $1.50 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

EUQUININE. (Quinine carbonic 
ester.) Tasteless, fleecy crys- 
tals, slightly soluble in water; 
soluble in alcohol, ether and 
chloroform. Succedaneum for 
quinine sulphate, reported not to 
disturb stomach or produce cin- 
dionism. Dose, same as quinine. 
Tablets, 5 grains, 100 in bot., 
$'■75; 2 grains, 100 in bot... 75c. 
(Merck & Co.) 

EURESOL. (Resorcine monoace- 
tate.) Oily, yellow liquid, solu- 
ble in alcohol and acetone. Suc- 
cedaneum for resorcin, externally. 
Used in skin and scalp diseases, 
as paint pure or diluted with 

acetone. 1 oz. vials $1.00 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 



EUROPHEN. Yellow light pow- 
der, containing 25 percent, of 
iodine, insoluble in water and 
glycerin. Iodoform substitute 
used in dry powder and in oint- 
ment. 1 oz. bot., per doz., 

$1.65 to $1.80 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

EUZONE. (Pure sodium perbo- 
rate.) White, odorless powder, 
containing about 7.1 percent, 
boron, 15 percent, sodium, 31.2 
percent, oxygen and 46.2 percent, 
water; represents 22 percent, by 
weight of hydrogen dioxide, 
equivalent to 10.4 percent, by 
weight of nascent oxygen. Solu- 
ble in water 1 in 10, such a solu- 
tion being taken to represent a 2 
percent. solution of hydrogen 
dioxide. Tablets, 2 Yi Gm. each, 
boxes of 20, 40c; powder, in 100 
Gm. cartons, 35c. ; 500 Gm. 

boxes $1.20 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

EXODIN. Yellowish powder; a 
synthetic oxyanthraquinone de- 
rivative; tasteless, mild aperient 
in doses of 7}4 to 15 grains. 1 
oz. vials, $1.40; tablets, grains 
each, 10 tablets in box; bot., 50 

in bottle $1.40 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

FER-PROTYLIN. (Ferrated phos 
phorus-albumin.) White, odor- 
less, tasteless powder; soluble in 
alkaline fluids. Contains phos- 
phorus, 2.7 percent., and iron, 2.3 
percent. Employed as a con- 
structive and haematinic in chloro- 
sis, anaemia, and as a ferrugi- 
nous food in conditions of debility 
in general. Dose, 10 to 20 
grains, 3 times daily, in soup or 
broth. Powder, 1 oz. cartons, 
50c; 4-grain tablets, per 100.55c. 
(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

FERRATIN. Reddish-brown pow- 
der, slowly soluble in ordinary 
liquids, but readily in hot bever- 
ages. Used in anaemia and chlo- 
rosis in doses of 71/2 grains three 
times daily. 1 oz. vials, 85c. ; 
tablets, 7V2 grains, 50 in box, per 

box 85c. 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 



FERRATOGEN. (Iron nuclei- 
nate.) Grayish-yellow powder, 
obtained by growing yeast in a 
ferruginous medium; insoluble in 
water. Used in chlorosis and 
anaemia, in doses of 5 grains, 
three times daily. 1 oz. cartons, 

each 90c. 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

FERRATOSE. (Liquor ferranti.) 
Fluid preparation of ferratin, con- 
taining 0.3 percent, iron. 250 

Gm. bottles 75c. 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

FERR1PYRIN. (Ferric chloride 
antipyrin.) Orange-red powder, 
soluble in 5 parts of water, very 
soluble in alcohol, but insoluble 
in ether. A compound of ferric 
chloride and antipyrine. Stypic 
and analgetic when applied in so- 
lution or powder. Given inter- 
nally in chlorosis and anaemia as 
a haematinic in doses of 7}4 

grains. 1 oz. tins $1.50 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

FERROPYRIN. (Same as Ferri- 
pyrin, but made by Knoll & Co. 
and sold in 1 oz. cartons, $1.40.) 
(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

FILMARON OIL 1:10. A 10 per- 
cent, solution of filmaron, the ac- 
tive principle of malefern, in cas- 
tor oil. Used in removal ot 

tapeworm. 10 Gm. bot 40c. 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

FIBROLYSIN. Solution of thio- 
sinamine and sodium salicylate, 
sterilized. Put up in sealed tubes, 
each containing 2.3 Cc. solution 
(— 0.2 Gm. tliiosinamine). Same 
uses as thiosin amine, but specially 
adapted for hypodermic use. Dose, 
contents of 1 tube every I, 2 or 
3 days, as required. 2.3 Cc. tubes 

each 15c. 

(Merck & Co.) 

FLLOROFORMOL. (F luoryl] 
Colorless, tasteless liquid, a 2.8 
percent, solution of fluoroform. 
Used in phthisis, internally and 
externally; also in pneumonia, 
acting as an antiseptic. Dose, 1 
tablespoonful four times daily. 1 

lb. bottle $1.00 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 



FLUOR RHEUM IN. Ointment com- 
posed of petrolatum, 10; lanolin, 
85; difluordiphc nyl, 4; fluor- 
phenetol, 1. Used in rheumatism, 
sciatica and lumbago; dose by in- 
unction, 4 to 5 Gm. Collapsible 
tubes, 20 Gm., 40c; 40 Cm.. 75c 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

FORMAMINT. Tablets composed of 
a combination of formaldehyde 
and lactose. Used as a substitute 
for gargles in inflamed and catar- 
rhal conditions of the mouth and 
throat, being a nonirritant and 
nontoxic antiseptic; bot. of 50, 1 

doz $6.75 

(The Bauer Chemical Company.) 

FORMIDINE. (Methylene disali- 
cylic acid iodide.) Reddish- 
yellow powder containing 47 per- 
cent, iodine. Insoluble in water, 
acids or alcohol, but readily solu- 
ble in alkaline solution. Substi- 
tute for iodoform, used both ex- 
ternally and internally. Dose as 
internal antiseptic, 1 to 5 grains, 
repeated as desired. 1 drachm 
vials, 20c; x oz. bot., 84c; 5 
grain capsules, bot of 100.. $1.50 
(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

FORTOINE. (Methylenedico- 
toine.) Yellow crystals, with 
slight cinnamon flavor, obtained 
through action of formaldehyde 
on cotoine; insoluble in water, 
sparingly soluble in alcohol, ether 
and benzol; easily soluble in 
chloroform, acetone and alkaline 
liquids. Astringent antiseptic in 
protracted diarrhoeas of consump- 
tives. Dose, 4 grains three times 
daily. 10 Gm. envelopes, each, 

$2.00 

(C. Bischoff 4 Co.) 
GALLOGEN. (Eixagic acid.) Yel- 
lowish, tasteless powder, insoluble 
in all acid and neutral media, 
but soluble in alkaline solutions. 
Resembles tannic acid, being the 
astringent principle of divi-divi. 
Used in dysentery and diarrhoea. 
Dose, 10 to 15 grains for adults, 
5 to 8 grains for children. 1 oz. 
cartons, 80c; chocolate coated 
tablets, 3 grains each, 24 in box, 

35C 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 




Show Cases 

OFTEN IMITATED NEVER EQUALED 




42 ALL-GLASS CASE 



This case is in a class by itself. It is without a doubi 
the strongest and most practical frameless case made. 
The joints are cemented by a patented process which 
makes them absolutely dustproof. It is possible to lift 
the case off the floor by the projecting edges of the 
top glass. No metal clips are used. Get our catalogue 
for 191 1 if in need of show cases. We make other 
styles. 



DETROIT SHOW CASE 
Detroit, Mich., U. S. A. 



CO. 





Sanatogen 

THE FOOD-/TONIC 



Keep Sanatogen and 
Sanatogen will help 
keep you 

Our advertising methods are making a deep im- 
pression everywhere. 

Just plain, straightforward truths about a prep- 
aration that has the confidence of scores of thou- 
sands of practising physicians the world over — just 
honest facts of what Sanatogen has done for hun- 
dreds of the world's famous peo- 
ple — written by themselves — just a 
campaign that is selling Sanato- 
gen — selling it in enormous quan- 
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class of purchasers to the coun- 
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We're ready to help you help 
yourself 

Get our plan for 
getting your share 
of Sanatogen Sales 

The Bauer Chemical Co. 

45 E. 17th St., New York 





66 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



GAULTHERINE. Pinkish powder, 
slowly soluble in cold water, more 
readily so in hot water; insoluble 
in ether and chloroform, but very 
soluble in alcohol. It is the so- 
dium salt of methyl salicylate pre- 
pared from natural oil of win- 
tergreen. Antiseptic, antifermen- 
tative and soothing antiputrefac- 
tive. Used internally and exter- 
nally. 4 oz. bot., per lb., $6.30; 
V 2 ib. bot., per lb., $6.60; 1 lb. 
bot $6 59 

(The Wm. S. Merrell Chemical Co.) 

OEOSOTE. See Guaiacol Valerate. 

OLUTOL. (Formaldehyde gela- 
tik.) Whitish, granular, insolu- 
ble powder; recommended as an 
antiseptic dressing for burns, cav- 
ities and ' suppurating ulcers. _ 1 
•z. tins, 65c; vials of % oz., with 

sprinkler top, each 25c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

OONOSAN. (The active principle 

OF KAVA KAVA DISSOLVED IN SAN- 

tal oil.) A greenish yellow, oily 
fluid, soluble in alcohol, ether and 
chloroform. Put up in gelatine 
capsules and recommended as an 
effective internal remedy in the 
treatment of gonorrhoea. Boxes 
containing 50 capsules, box.. 75c. 
(Riedel & Company, New York.) 
GUAETHOL. (Ajacol; thanatol.) 
Oily liquid, or purer in crystals 
resembling thymol, insoluble in 
water. Succedaneum for guaia- 
col. Allays pain by direct appli- 
cation. Dose, 4 to 8 minims. 1 

oz. vials $1.40 

GUAIACOL VALERATE. (Gso- 
sote.) Yellow, oily liquid; a 
combination of guaiacol and vale- 
rianic acid, having the character- 
istic odor of the latter. Insolu- 
ble in water, soluble in alcohol 
*nd ether. Said to be useful in 
tuberculosis and chlorosis and as 
intestinal antiseptic in doses of 3 
to 10 _ minims three times daily. 
3 minim capsules, per 100.. $2. 10 
OUAIACETIN. (Sodium pyro- 
catechin-monoacetate.) White 
odorless powder, soluble in wa- 
ter. A succedaneum for guaiacol 
and creosote, used in tuberculo- 



sis. Dose, 8 grains, preferably in 
tablet form. Powder in 1 oz. 
tins, $3.30; bot. containing 100 
tablets, 8 grains each, $3.50; 50, 

$2.00; 25 $1.17 

(Fuerst Bros. & Co.) 

GUJASANOL. (Diethylglycocoll- 
guaiacol.) Crystalline powder, 
readily soluble in water. Indica- 
tions same as for creosote and 
guaiacol. Used internally in doses 
of from 45 to 180 grains a day. 

25 Gm. bot $1.00 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

HEDONAL. White, crystalline pow- 
der, insoluble in water, but solu- 
ble in alcohol, chloroform and 
ether; best administered as a dry 
powder. Given in mild forms of 
insomnia as a hypnotic in doses 
of 15 to 30 grains. 1 oz. bot., 

$1.50 to $1.60 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

HELMITOL. (Hexamethylene 
tetramine - anhydromethylene 
citrate.) Colorless crystals, free- 
ly soluble in water; insoluble in 
alcohol and ether. Urinary an- 
tiseptic in cystitis, • phosphaturia, 
urethritis, etc., in doses of 15 
grains, three or four times daily; 
liberates formaldehyde in the uri- 
nary tract. 1 oz. bot 60c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

HEM1CRANIN. White powder; a 
mixture of 5 parts phenacetin, 1 
part caffeine and 1 part citric 
acid, used in migraine, head- 
aches, intercostal neuralgia and 
sciatica, in doses of 5 to 10 
grains. 1 oz. cartons, per oz. .90c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

HEROIN. White, crystalline pow- 
der, difficultly soluble in water, 
but readily so in alcohol and in 
water to which a little acetic acid 
has been added; incompatible with 
alkali carbonates. Substitute for 
morphine, of which it is the dia- 
cetic acid ester, in doses of 1-24 
to 1-12 grain; used for relief of 
cough and dyspnoea in phthisis, 
pneumonia, etc. 15 grain vials., 
29c. per vial; % oz. vials, per oz., 
$7.00; 1 oz. vials, per oz....$6.7o 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 



HEROIN HYDROCHLORIDE. 

(Water soluble salt op heroin.) 
White, crystalline powder, used 
in same indications as heroin, but 
is adapted for hypodermatic in- 
jections. The dose and prices are 
the same as those of heroin. 
(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

HIPPOL. (Methylene hippuric 
acid.) Colorless, prismatic crys- 
tals; sparingly soluble in water; 
urinary antiseptic in bacterial dis- 
eases of the urinarv trarr. Tin--- 
2254 grains. 1 oz., $1.50; ao 

tablets in box $1.10 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

HIRUDIN. Grayish, glittering 
plates and scales, representing a 
dried extract of the head, pharyn- 
geal rings and lips of the leech 
(Sanguisuga medicinalis) ; readily 
soluble in water. Used in the 
treatment of certain diseases of 
women and in experiments to pre- 
vent coagulation of blood on ex- 
posure to air. Tubes, 0.01 Gm., 
50c; 0.1 Gm., $2.75; 1 Gm..$ig.oo 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

HISTOSAN. (Guaiacol albumin- 
ate.) Light brown powder of 
faintly aromatic odor and taste; 
soluble in water. Used in pul- 
monary tuberculosis and in diar- 
rhoea in doses of 7J4 grains three 
times daily. 1 oz. cartons. .$1. 3c 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

HOLOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE. 

White, crystalline powder, diffi- 
cultly soluble in cold (1 in 75), 
but readily so in hot water. 
Chemically para-diethyoxyethenyl- 
diphenyl-amidine hydrochloride, 
produced by combination of 
phenacetin and para-phenetidin. 
Antiseptic and germicidal in i 
percent, solution. Used entirely 
as anaesthetic for operations on 
the eye, a 1 percent, solution 
being equal to 2 percent, cocaine 
solution. 1 Gm. vials, 35c; 5 
Gm. vials, per Gm., 30c; 1 oz. 

vials, per oz $7.00 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 



HYDRONAL. (Polymerized chlo- 
ral.) White powder, a polymeric 
form of anhydrous chloral, known 
in Germany as viferral. It dis- 
solves slowly in cold, but readily 
in boiling water. Used as hyp- 
notic in simple sleeplessness and 
in the insomnia of mania in doses 
of 15 grains. Tubes of 5 tablets, 

1 Gm. each 35c. 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

HYPNAL. (Chloral hydrate — an- 
tipyrin.) White crystals, read- 
ily soluble in hot water, slowly so 
in cold water. Mild hypnotic 
and analgetic in doses of 15 to 

30 grains. 1 oz. bot $145 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

HYRGOL. (Colloidal mercury.) 
Dark, solid body, fairly soluble in 
cold water, insoluble in alcohol 
and ether; used in syphilis as 10 
percent, ointment by inunction, 
and pills and tablets internally. 
Dose, l /2 to y± grain thrice daily. 

1 oz. vials 80c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

ICHTHALBIN. (Ichthyol albumin 
ate.) Grayish-brown powder, 
odorless and tasteless; combina- 
tion of ichthyol and albumin, 
containing 40 percent, of the 
former. Used internally for skin 
diseases and gastro-intestinal af- 
fections in doses of 5 to 30 grains 
three times daily. 1 oz. cartons. 
$1; 5 grain tablets, 100 in bot., 
$1.05 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

ICHTHARGAN. (Ichthyol silver; 
silver ichthyolsulphonate; sil- 
ver THIO-HYDROCARBUROSULPHON- 
ate.) Brown powder containing 
30 percent silver;' soluble in wa- 
ter and glycerin. Bactericide and 
astringent in urinary diseases in 
injections of 1 to 500 and 1 to 
3000 in water; in diseases of the 
eye, as trachoma, by brush appli- 
cations of 1 to 3 percent, solu- 
tions. Dose, 1-24 to 1-12 grain in 
water. 1 oz. vials, $3.00; Yi oz.. 

$3.ic 

(Merck & Co.) 



The finest American-made Gelatine 

ost Card. 

Made to Order. Platino, Sepia, Hand-colored. 
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67 



ICHTHOFORM. (Ichthyol for- 
maldehyde.) Blackish-brown pow- 
der, insoluble in water. Used ex- 
ternally as succedaneum for iodo- 
form. Internally as intestinal an- 
tiseptic in the diarrhoea and intes- 
tinal disorders occurring in tuber- 
cular diseases, and in typhoid 
fever and dysentery. Dose, 15 to 
30 grains three or four times 
daily, in powder or capsules. 1 

oz. vials $1.00 

(Merck & Co.) 

IODALBIN. Reddish powder. Pro- 
teid combination of iodine, said 
to contain 21.5 percent, of the 
element. Readily soluble in alka- 
line fluids, but insoluble in water, 
acids or alcohol. Same uses as 
potassium iodide, being alterative, 
resolvent and eliminative. Dose, 
5 grains, repeated as desired. 1 
oz. bot., 75c. ; s grain capsules, 

bot. of 100 85c. 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

I0DFERRATOSE. A syrup contain 
ing 0.3 percent, of iron and 0.3 
percent, of iodine. 250 Gm. bot- 
tles 75C 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

I0D1P1N. (Iodized sesame oil; 
Iodinol.) Thick, yellow oil, 
odorless and of oily taste, made 
similarly to bromipin by repeated 
iodization of sesame oil by means 
of iodine monochloride in alco- 
holic solution; insoluble in water 
and alcohol, soluble in ether and 
chloroform. Made in two 
strengths, 10 percent, iodine and 
25 percent, iodine, respectively, 
the former for internal and the 
latter for hypodermic use. Suc- 
cedaneum for iodide in syphilis, 
scrofula, etc Dose, 10 percent., 
1 to 3 fl. drachms; hypodermi- 
cally (25 percent.), 30 to 90 
minims. On unspecified orders 
the 10 percent, strength is sup- 
plied. Used in all cases where 
iodine and iodides are indicated; 
hypodermically in syphilis. 10 
percent, strength, 1 lb. bottles, 
♦3-65; Vi lb., $3.90; 1 oz. vials, 
28c; 20 percent., 1 lb. bottles, 
$8.25; Vi lb., $8.30; 1 oz. vials, 
65c. 

(Merck & Co.) 



IODOFORMOGEN. Light yellow 
powder, odorless in use; combina- 
tion of iodoform and albumin, in- 
soluble in water, capable of steril- 
ization; used like iodoform as a 
dressing for wounds. 1 oz. car- 
tons 55C 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

IODOZEN. Yellowish-white powder, 
a chemical combination of methyl 
salicylate and iodine; insoluble in 
water, soluble in 2 parts of alco- 
hol, in 3 parts of ether and in 10 
parts of chloroform. Antiseptic 
application, applied as solution or 
ointment Marketed in sprinkler 
top cans, 1 oz 75 c - 

(The Wm. S. Merrell Chemical Co.) 

10DOTHYR1NE. Whitish powder, 
representing the active principle 
of the thyroid gland, combined 
with sugar of milk. Alterative in 
goitre, myxcedema, obesity, psori- 
asis, menstrual disorders of 
women, etc.. in daily doses of 15 
to 30 grains. Powder, in J A oz. 
vials, per oz., $3.90; I ox., $3.4*. 
Tablets, 5 grains each, vials of 
25, per vial, $1.00; 100.... $3. 90 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

IOTHION. Syrupy, yellowish-brown 
liquid, difficultly soluble in water, 
easily soluble in alcohol, ether, 
benzol and chloroform; miscible 
with petrolatum and with anhy- 
drous lanolin, which takes up 
twice its weight of iothion. Or- 
ganic compound of iodine, of 
which it contains 79 to 80 per- 
cent. Applied in form of solu- 
tion in olive oil or ointment by 
inunction. 1 oz. bot., per oz., 

$1.10 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

IRON TONOL. (Iron glycero- 
phosphate. Powder; soluble in 
water; tonic, nerve nutrient. 
Dose, 3 to 10 grains. 1 oz., 35c; 

1 lb $3-50 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

IRON TROPON. Brownish powder; 
albuminoid food preparation com- 
posed of tropon (pure albumen) 
and iron in an assimilable form. 
Contains 2'/i percent, of iron. 
Used as a tonic food in treatment 
of anaemia, chlorosis, impover- 



ished condition of the system 
generally, and in convalescence. 
Tins, 100 Gm., 75c; 1 doz. tins, 
$6.75 

(Tropon Works.) 

ISOFORM. (Para - iodo : anisol.) 
Colorless powder of faint anise 
odor. Difficultly soluble in water; 
insoluble in alcohol, ether, etc. 
Substitute for iodoform for treat- 
ment of wounds, abscesses, ulcers, 
etc. Supplied as isoform powder 
(isoform pur., calc. phosph., equal 

parts). 25 Gm. bot 60c. 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

ISOPRAL. White crystals, soluble 
in water up to 3 percent, and 
easily in alcohol and ether. A 
nondepressing substitute for chlo- 
ral in doses of 7 to 15 grains, in- 
dicated in all forms of sleepless- 
ness in which chloral is em- 
ployed. Powder, in 1 oz. bot., 
per oz., $1.40; 8 grain tablets, 
bottles of 100, $3.00; 8 grain tab- 
lets, tubes of 20 75c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

KRESAMINE. Clear, watery li- 
quid, representing a solution of 
trikresol, 25 percent., and ethyl- 
enediamine, 25 percent.; soluble 
in 3 parts of water, and in all 
proportions of glycerin; antisep- 
tic and sedative to inflamed tis- 
sues. 1 oz $1.00 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

KRYOFINE. White, granular crys- 
tals, sparingly soluble in cold wa- 
ter (1 in 600); freely soluble in 
alcohol and ether. A compound 
of paraphenetidin and methylgly- 
colic acid. Antipyretic and anti- 
neuralgic in doses of 4 to ^y^ 
grains. 1 oz. cartons, powd., 
$1.00; tablets, 4 or 7J4 grains, 

per oz $i.o« 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

LACT0PHEN1N. (Lactyl - para- 
phenetidin.) Small, white crys- 
tals, soluble in 330 parts of wa- 
ter. Differs from phenacetin in 
containing a molecule of lactic 
acid in place of acetic. Antipy- 
retic and analgetic in doses of 4 
to 8 grains. 1 oz. cartons, each, 
$1.00 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 



LACTOSERVE. Buttermilk in pow- 
der form, scientifically prepared 
from fresh milk, free from bac- 
teria. Used as infant food. 250 

Gm. tins 25c. 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

LARQIN. (Silver protalbin.) 
Gray powder containing 11 per- 
cent, of silver; soluble in 10 par's 
of water. Bactericide and astrin- 
gent application in gonorrhoea in 
Yi to 1 y 3 percent, injections. 1 

oz. vials $1-75 

(Merck & Co.) 

LENIGALLOL. (Pyrogallol tri- 
acetate.) White, crystalline pow- 
der, insoluble in water, possess- 
ing the same reducing properties 
as pyrogallol and- used in acute 
and chronic eczema as ointment. 

1 oz. vials $i.oe 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

LEVULOSE. (Fruit sugar.) Crys- 
talline powder, soluble in water. 
Sweetening agent used in dia- 
betes, tuberculosis, malnutrition 
and marasmus of children. Dose, 
3 drachms to 2 ounces daily. 1 

lb. jars $1.60 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

LYCETOL. (Diethylenediaminr 
tartrate.) White powder, readily 
soluble in water. Uric acid sol- 
vent, antiarthritic and diuretic 
in doses of 5 to 10 grains three 
times daily. 10 Gm. vials, $1.50; 
54 oz., J4 oz., 1 oz. cartons, per 
oz $4-25 to $4.40 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Schering & Glatz.) 

LYGOSINE. (Sodium lygosimatr.) 
Glossy, greenish crystals; a con- 
densation product of salicylalde- 
hyde and acetone; readily soluble 
in water, forming ruby red solu- 
tions. Nonirritant substitute for 
silver as urethral injection in 
gonorrhoea, 5 percent, strength. 

10 Gm. vials 35c. 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

LYSIDIN. (Ethylene-ethenyldia- 
mine hydrochloride.) Pale yel- 
lowish liquid, containing 50 per- 
cent, of pure lysidin, the sub- 
stance itself being very hygro- 



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08 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



scopic. Used in acute gout and 
uric acid diathesis in doses of 
10 to 30 minims. 1 oz. vials, 

$1-75 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

MARETIN. White, glistening crys- 
tals, very sparingly soluble in wa- 
ter (1 to 1050). Antipyretic, be- 
ing a methyl acetanilid with a 
urea nucleus in place of the acetyl 
group. Dose, 3 to 5 grains. 1 
oz. cartons, per oz., 

$1.25 to $1.40 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

MEDINAL. (Sodium salt of die- 
thyl - barbituric - acid.) White, 
crystalline powder soluble in 20 
percent, of cold water. It is 
more rapidly absorbed and ex- 
creted than its base and has a 
more prompt hypnotic effect, with 
freedom from cumulative toxic 
action. Used in all conditions n( 
insomnia. Dose: 5 to 15 grains, 
dissolved in water (never taken 
dry). Per rectum, 5 to 7Vi 
grains in 1 drachm of water. 
Subcutaneously 75 minims of 10 
percent, solution. 1 oz. cartons, 
$1.60; box of 10x5 grain tablets, 
30c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

MEROAL. (Mercury cholate.) A 
mixture of mercury cholate and 
tannin albuminate. A yellowish- 
white powder, insoluble in water; 
slightly soluble in water that has 
been made alkaline, and in sodi- 
um chloride solution. Used in the 
internal mercurial treatment of 
syphilis. Bottles containing 50 

capsules, bottles 75c. 

(Riedel & Company, New York.) 

METHAFORM. (Dimethylcarbinoi 
chloroform.) White, shiny, 
needle-like crystals, with a slight- 
ly camphoraceous taste and odor, 
sparingly soluble in water, but 
readily so in chloroform, alco- 
hol, ether and glacial acetic acid. 
It is hypnotic, analgesic, anaes- 
thetic and antiseptic, somewhat 
resembling chloral in physiologi- 
cal action. 1 oz. vials, 60c; 3 
grain capsules, bot. of 100, 50c; 

5 grain, 100 75c. 

(Frederick Stearns & Co.) 



MERCUROL. Brownish powder, 
soluble in water; insoluble in al- 
cohol; a chemical combination of 
nucleinic acid and mercury, con- 
taining 10 percent, of the metal. 
Does not coagulate albuminous 
liquids. Applied to ulcers and 
suppurating mucous membranes in 
from l /t to s percent, solution, or 
in ointment. oz. vials, per oz., 

$1.60; 1 oz. vials $1.50 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

MESOTAN. (Methyloxy - methy- 
lester of salicylic acid.) Clear, 
yellow fluid, insoluble in water, 
but miscible with alcohol, ether 
and fixed oils. External applica- 
tion mixed with equal parts of 
olive oil in muscular and articu- 
lar rheumatism, pleuritis and 
gout. 1 oz. bot., 47c; 25 oz. lots, 
42c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

MIGRAININ. (Phenazone caf- 
feine citrate.) Small white 
crystals, readily soluble in water 
and alcohol. Analgetic and anti- 
pyretic. Used in migraine, head- 
aches of influenza, neuralgia, sci- 
atica, etc., in doses of 17 grains. 

1 oz. tins $i-SO 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

MONOTAL. (Methylglycolic acid 
ester of guaiacol.) Limpid, col- 
orless oil, soluble in alcohol, 
ether and chloroform; difficultly 
soluble in water. Used like guai- 
acol as analgetic, etc., applied with 
a brush or lightly rubbed in. 1 
oz. bot 55c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

NARQOL. Brownish powder, read- 
ily soluble in warm water. Com- 
pound of silver and nucleinic 
acid containing 10 percent, of the 
former; does not coagulate al- 
bumen. Used in gonorrhoea, con- 
junctival and other pyogenic in- 
flammations. i4 oz. vials, per 
oz., $1.80; ;4 oz. vials, per oz., 

$1.75; 1 oz $1.70 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

NOVAROAN. (Silver proteinate.) 
Fine yellow powder containing 10 
percent, of metallic silver, read- 
ily soluble in water. Used as in- 
jection in gonorrhoea; is very 
penetrating and free from irri- 



tating ellects upon mucous mem- 
brane. 1 oz. vials $1.40 

(Heyden Chemical Works.) 
NOVASPIRIN. (Methylene-citryl- 
salicylic acid.) White crystal- 
line powder, easily soluble in al- 
cohol; almost insoluble in water. 
Contains 62 percent, salicylic 
acid. Given in same doses as 
the salicylates in same conditions 
(10 to 15 grains, several times 
daily). 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

NOVOCAINE. (Para - amido - ben- 
zoyl - diethylamine - ethanol 
mono-hydrochloride). Crystalline 
needles, readily soluble in water. 
Substitute for cocaine. Used in 
solutions of 0.25 Gm. novocaine 
in 50 or 100 Gm. physiological 
salt solution with 5 to 10 drops 
of 1:1000 adrenalin solution as a 
local anaesthetic. 5 Gm. vials, 75c. ; 

1 oz. bot $3 23 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

NOVOCAINE NITRATE. Put up in 
the same way as novocaine, of 
which it has same properties and 
sold at same price. 

NUTROSE. (Casein-sodium.) Col- 
orless, tasteless powder, consist- 
ing of casein of milk combined 
with alkaline sodium. Soluble in 
water. Used as a food in ill- 
ness and convalescence, adminis- 
tered in soups, milk, coffee or 
cocoa. Cartons, '/i lb., $4.00 per 

lb.; 1 lb $3.3S 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

OREXINE. (Phenyldihydroquina- 
zoline tannate.) Yellowish pow- 
der, tasteless and odorless; insolu- 
ble in water, slightly soluble in 
dilute acid solutions, readily so in 
hydrochloric acid. Should not be 
prescribed with preparations of 
iron. Used in anorexia (lack of 
appetite) as stimulant of gastric 
secretion; in seasickness and vom- 
iting of pregnancy. Orexine 
base is no longer on the market. 
Dose, 8 to 12 grains two times 
daily, in powder or in tablets. 1 
oz. vials, $1.00; orexoids, Merck's 
tablets, 4 grains, 50 in bottle. 55c. 
(Merck & Co.) 

ORPHOL. (Bismuth betanaph- 
tholate. ) Odorless and tasteless 
fawn colored powder, insoluble in 



water; tunsists of 80 percent, bis- 
muth oxide ai cl 20 percent, beta- 
naphthol. Intestinal antiseptic in 
doses of 5 to 15 grains three or 
four times daily. 1 oz., 80c. ; tab- 
lets, 5 grains, 50 tablets in vial, 

per vial 60c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

ORTHOFORM. White crystalline 
powder, the methyl ester of meta- 
amidoparaoxybenzoic acid; slight- 
ly soluble in water; local anaes- 
thetic and antiseptic. Forms * 
hydrochloride salt soluble in 9 
parts of water. 10 percent, so- 
lution of the hydrochloride salt, 
or 10 to 20 percent, in ointment 
used to alleviate pain in sores or 
burns. Orthoform, 1 oz. vials, 
$1.40; orthoform hydrochloride, 1 

oz. vials $1.80 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

OVARADEN. Tasteless and odor- 
less powder consisting of the ac- 
tive substance of pigs' ovaries. 
Used in dysmenorrhea and neu- 
rasthenia in doses of 15 to 30 
grains daily. 1 oz. vials, $1.30; 
4 grain tablets, bottles of 100, 

$1.30 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck 4 Co.) 

OVARIIN. Powder representing 1 
part in 8 of fresh cow's ovary, 
being the desiccated substance of 
the ovary. Used in chlorosis, af- 
fections of the heart, and men- 
strual troubles. 1 oz. vials, $a.oo; 
y 2 oz., $1.10; 3 grain tablets, 100 

in bottle $1.50 

(Merck & Co.) 

OVOGAL. (Albumen cholate.) A 
greenish-yellow powder insoluble 
in water, recommended as a chola 
gogue in acute and chronic catarrh 
of the liver, gall bladder, etc 
Boxes containing 50 capsules, 

box 75c 

(Riedel & Company, New York.) 

OXAPHOR. (Solution of oxyxam- 
phor.) Alcoholic solution of oxy- 
camphor (50 percent.), a product 
related to camphor, but different 
from camphor in its action. Used 
in dyspnoea, nervous asthma, ero- 
pysema and bronchitis in doses of 
40 to 60 drops. 1 oz. bottles, 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 



CONCENTRATED 



Registered 



^ BOUILLON 



One teaspoonful for a cup of 




Trade Mirk 



eel Tea 



sample GALLON, $6.00 

Ready for shipment, sent to any R. R. or 
express station in Manhattan upon receipt 
of $6.00 



BOUILLON 
CAPSULES 

Merely drop a Capsule in a cup 
of boiling water and serve 

For sale by all jobbers. Write for 
particulars to sole Manufacturers 

ROYAL SPECIALTY CO. 

25 Broad Street, New York. 




Hotel Lenox 



BUFFALO. N. Y. 




3 IS ffT: 



Eg 



it*/- 



HIGHEST GRAPE FIREPROOF 
Ideal hotel (or visitors to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Points on the 
Great Lakes and Canadian Resorts. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

$1.50 per day and up 
ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT PRICES 

Patrons may take Taxicabs or Carriages from Depot* or 
Wharves direct to hotel, charging same to The Lenox 

When in Buffalo stop at THE LENOX. The accommodations 
and service are sure to please. 

C. A. MINER, Manager 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



69 



PANKREON. Grayish-red powder; 
a tannin-pancreatin compound; 
insoluble in water, obtained from 
the pancreas; used in pancreatic 
diabetes, gastritis and apepsia in 
doses of tY, grains three times 
daily. Box of 25 Gm., $1.50; tab- 
lets of 0.25 Gm., 50 in box, 
$1.00; sugar tablets grain), 

100 in box 5 0C - 

(Merck & Co.) 

PEGNIN. Milk sugar and rennet 
preparation for making cows' 
milk more digestible for infants 
and invalids. Powder, 4 oz. bot., 
50c. 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

PEROGEN BATH. (Oxygen Bath 
Salts.) Perogen bath is a prepa- 
ration consisting of a catalyzer 
and sodium perborate capable of 
yielding 10 percent, of oxygen, 
the two substances being wrapped 
separately. The catalyzer is a 
light yellow odorless powder, and 
is made by a method which is 
the subject of a patent application 
now pending. Said to be useful 
in cardiac affections with high 
vascular tension and excitement, 
neuroses, insomnia, chronic nephri- 
tis and skin diseases. Tins, $1.00; 

doz $8.uo 

(Morgenstern & Co.) 

PHENOCOLL HYDROCHLORIDE. 
White, crystalline powder, with 
sharp, saline taste; soluble in 16 
parts of water; very soluble in 
hot water and alcohol. Similar 
to phenacetin, and used in ma- 
laria, pneumonia, intiuenza, rheu- 
matism, etc. Dose, / to 15 grains. 

25 Gm. vials $1 £0 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

PIPERAZINE. Crystalline powder 
readily soluble in water. Solvent 
of uric acid and insoluble urates 
in the system; used in gout, rheu- 
matism and urinary calculi. Dose, 
5 to 15 grains thrice daily. 10 
Gm. vials, per vial, $1.50; lots 
of 60, per vial, $1.25. Tablets, 
tubes of ten 15 grain tablets, 
$1.50; 60 tubes, per tube, $1.25; 
U and 1 oz. bot., per oz...$4.25 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Schering & Glatz.) 

POLLANTIN. Liquid and powder; 
antitoxic serum for hay fever, au- 
tumnal catarrh, rose fever and 



June cold. Package of powder 
and brush, $1.75; liquid, per 
package of serum and pipette, 

(Fritzsche Brothers.) 
PROBILIN PILLS. Composed of 
salicylic acid, sodium oleate, so- 
dium stearate, phenolphthalein 
and menthol. Choleic antiseptic 
and stimulant, indicated in he- 
patic insufficiency, infection and 
lithiasis. Dose, 3 or 4 pills twice 
daily for 20 days or longer, fol- 
lowed by half a pint or more of 
hot water; then once daily for 
the same length of time. Vials 

of 60, per vial $1.25 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

PROFERRIN. (Iron nucleopro- 
teid. ) Reddish-brown powder, 
insoluble in water and acid solu- 
tions; contains 10 percent, of 
iron and 1 percent, of phos- 
phorus, in organic combination; is 
absorbed from the duodenum, be- 
ing unaffected by the gastric 
juice. Used in blood impoverish- 
ment in doses of 5 grains three 
times daily. 1 oz. cartons, per 
doz., $6.00; 5 grain tablets, bottle 
of 100, 60c; 2 l /i grain, bottle of 

100 40c. 

(H. K. Mulford Co.) 

PROTAN. (Tannin nucleopro- 
teid. ) Light brown powder, in- 
soluble in water; formed by the 
synthesis of tannic acid with nu- 
cleo-proteid. Used in all forms 
of diarrhoea in doses of from 20 
to 30 grains; is astringent and 
acts in the intestines, being un- 
affected by the gastric juice. 1 
oz. cartons, per doz., $6.00; 7^ 
grain tablets, bottle of 100, 85c; 

5 grain, per 100 60c. 

(H. K. Mulford Co.) 

PROTARGOL. Yellowish-light pow- 
der, easily soluble in water. A 
proteid compound containing 8 
percent, of silver; not precipi- 
tated by albumen or salt solu- 
tions. Bactericide in gonorrhoea; 
antiseptic in eye, ear, nose and 
throat affections. 0.25 to 1 per- 
cent, solutions for gonorrhoea; 
o-5 to 5 percent, for eye, and 2 
to 10 percent, for ear, nose and 
throat. Internally, in doses of 1 



to 3 grains. l /i oz. and 1 oz. 
vials, per oz $1.10 to $1.35 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

PROTYLIN. (Phosphorus - albu- 
min.) White, odorless, tasteless 
powder, containing 2.6 percent, 
phosphorus. Insoluble in water; 
soluble in alkaline liquids. Re- 
ported to be an assimilable, non- 
toxic form of phosphorus. Nerve 
tonic and reconstructive in neu- 
rasthenia, rickets, scrofula, etc. 
Dose, 10 to 20 grains in soup, 
broth, etc., 3 times daily. Must 
not be boiled with food. 1 oz. 
cartons, 50c; 4-grain tablets, per 

100 55c. 

(See combinations under arsylin, 
fer-protylin and bromprotylin.) 
(Hoffmann-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

PURGATIN. (Purgatol; anthra- 
purpurin acetate.) Yellow crys- 
talline powder; a synthetic oxy- 
anthraquinone, having mild aper- 
ient properties; insoluble in wa- 
ter; decomposed in contact with 
alkalies. Dose, 10 to 30 grains. 
1 oz. cartons, 85c; 5 grain tab- 
lets, 100 in bottle $1.00 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

PYRAiYUDON. (Phenyl-dimethyl- 

Dl M ETHYL AM IDOP YRAZ0L0N. ) White 

powder, soluble in 9 parts of wa- 
ter and 2 parts of alcohol. Used 
as antipyretic in treatment of 
asthma, pulmonary tuberculosis 
and abdominal typhus, and as 
anodyne in headaches and neural- 
gic pains in doses of 8 to 12 
grains. 1 oz. cartons, $2.15; py- 
ramidon camphorate acid, 1 oz. 
bot., $1.50; camphorate, neutral, 
1 oz. bot., $1.75; salicylate, 1 oz. 

bot $1.50 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 
PYRENOL, a white, crystalline, 
slightly hygroscopic powder of 
aromatic odor and sweetish taste, 
is an addition product of sali- 
cylic and benzoic acids with thy- 
mol. Antiseptic, expectorant, anal- 
getic, sedative, antipyretic and 
cardiotonic. Indicated in the 
treatment of asthma, bronchitis, 
pertussis, pneumonia, influenza, 
typhoid fever, and in rheumatic 
and neuralgic affections. Dose, 
7V2 t0 '5 grains, thrice daily, dry 



or in cold liquids. 1 oz. vial, 70c; 

tubes of 20 tablets 30c 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

QUARTONOL. Tablets consisting of 
a compound of duotonal, quinine 
tonal and strychnine tonal. Blood 
and nerve tonic. Dose, 1 to 2 
tablets three times daily. Bottle 

of 100 s-grain tablets 75c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

QUININE LYGOSINATE. Orange- 
yellow, amorphous powder, con- 
taining 70.8 percent, of quinine; 
difficultly soluble in water, readily 
soluble in alcohol, chloroform and 
benzin. Nontoxic antiseptic and 
styptic, employed as a dusting 
powder, gauze or suppository. 10 

Gm. vials, each 70c. 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

RENADEN. Powder, obtained from 
extract of pigs' kidneys; used in 
uraemia and nephritis in doses of 
1 to 2 drachms daily. 1 oz. 
vials, $1.30; 4 grain tablets, bot- 
tles of 100 $1.30 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

RODAGEN. White powder consist- 
ing of the dried milk of thyro- 
idectomised goats with 50 per- 
cent, milk sugar. Used in ex- 
ophthalmic goitre in doses of 75 to 
150 grains daily. 1 oz. bot.. $1.00 
(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

RUBIDIUM IODIDE. Colorless, cu 
bical crystals; soluble in less than 
1 in 1 of water; bitter, saline 
taste. Used in place of potas- 
sium iodide in polyarthritis and 
syphilis. Dose, 5 to 20 grains. 1 

oz. vial $i.o* 

(Merck & Co.) 

SAJODIN. Calcium moniodobehe- 
nate.) Colorless, odorless and 
tasteless powder of neutral reac- 
tion. Insoluble in water, alcohol 
and ether; soluble in chloroform. 
Contains 24.5 percent, of iodine. 
Intended as a tasteless substitute 
for potassium iodide. Dose, 15 to 
45 grains daily. }4 oz. and 1 oz. 
bot., $1.25 per oz. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

SALAMID. White or slightly pink- 
ish-white crystals, melting at 138 
degrees C. ; made from natural 
oil of gaultheria by the action of 
ammonia on the methylester of 
salicylic acid. Aqueous solutions 





BE GUREYHIS NAME IN 
RED IS ON THE LABEL. 



ureHawaiian 




A Wonderful, New, Healthful All-the- Year- 
Round Drink. Physicians prescribe it in throat, 
stomach and intestinal troubles. A refreshing drink 
during fever convalescence. Druggists, Grocers and 
Soda Fountains supplied by any wholesale Drug- 
gist or Grocer. If you can't get Dole's write us. 
Booklet for the asking. 

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE PRODUCTS CO., Ltd. 
112 Market Street San Francisco. Cal- 



Inlaid Linoleum Factory Prices 

Beautiful designs, solid colors through to the back. Noiseless and warm. An ideal floor covering for drug stores, offices and 

household use. Send diagram of floor for estimate and designs 

fHEIMIlVIORE & CO. - Trenton, IM. «J. 




The Ammonol Chemical Co., u S!ffi la JNew York City. 



AMMONOL AND COMBINATIONS. 

Ammonol Powdered. 

Ammonol & Salicylate Powdered. In one-ounce 

bottles only. 
Ammonol Tablets. 
Ammonol & Salicylate Tablets. 
Ammonol & Lithia Tablets. 
Ammonol Peptonate Tablets. 
Ammonol & Bromide Tablets. 
Ammonol Camphorated Tablets. 
Ammonol with Camphor and Codeine Tablets. 
Ammonol with Ipecac and Opium Tablets. 
In five-grain flat oval tablets, put up in one-ounce 

bottles. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST ivhen writing to Advertisers. 



70 



\MERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



are colored violet with iron chlo- 
ride solution and decomposed by 
sodium hydrate solution, forming 
sodium salicylate and evolving 
ammonia vapors. Used in same 
indications as the salicylates, but 
the ammonia combination is be- 
lieved to prevent cardiac depres- 
sion, i oz. cartons 8oc. 

(The Wm. S. Merrell Chemical 
Company.) 

SAL-ETHYL. A colorless, transpa- 
rent, volatile fluid; chemically 
pure ethyl salicylate. A substi- 
tute for methyl salicylate or oil 
of wintergreen. Globules, 5 min., 
in bot. of 50, per doz., bot..$5.oo 
(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

SALIPYRIN. A crystalline powder 
forming a compound of antipyrin 
and salicylic acid. Used as a 
remedy against influenza, colds 
and rheumatic affections in doses 
of 7'/ t to 15 grains. In boxes 
containing 1 oz. powder, 1 oz., 
80c. ; tubes of 12 tablets, 15 grains 

each, tube 35c. 

(Riedel & Company, New York.) 

SALIT. (Salicylic acid ester or 
born eol. ) Oily fluid, insoluble in 
water, slightly soluble in glycerin 
and readily soluble in alcohol, 
ethers and oils. Used in muscu- 
lar and articular rheumatism, 
lumbago, neuralgia and rheumatic 
pains following colds. 1 oz. bot., 
22c. 

(Heyden Chemical Works.) 

SALOCREOL. (Salicylic acid 
ESTER OF creosote.) Oily fluid of 
neutral reaction, almost odorless, 
insoluble in water, readily soluble 
in alcohol, ether, chloroform and 
oils. Used in facial erysipelas, 
acute and chronic inflammation of 
the lymph glands and chronic ar- 
thritis. 1 oz. bot 45c. 

SALOPHEN. White, crystalline 
powder, containing 51 percent, of 
salicylic acid; almost insoluble in 
water; soluble in alcohol and 
ether; incompatible with alkalies, 
which decompose it. Antipyretic, 
analgetic and antiseptic in rheu- 
matism and neuralgia. Dose, 10 
to 15 grains 3 to 4 times daily. 
I oz. cartons 85c. to $1.00 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 



SALOQU1NINE. (Salicylic acid 
i-.STtR of quinine.) Whitish pow- 
der, insoluble in water, with diffi- 
culty soluble about 1 in 120 of al- 
cohol and ether. Tasteless qui- 
nine substitute, used in malaria, 
tropical fevers, neuralgia and 
rheumatism. Dose, 15 to 30 
grains, one to three times daily. 
Yi and 1 oz. cartons, 

$1.25 to $1.30 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Merck & Co.) 

SANATOGEN.. Fine white powder, 
soluble in water. A combination 
of casein, 95 percent., and sodi- 
um glycerophosphates, 5 percent. 
Used as a strengthening food and 
aid to metabolism in neurasthenia, 
marasmus and gastrointestinal dis- 
eases. Packages of 100 Gm., $9.00 
a dozen; 200 Gm. $17.25 a 
dozen, and 400 Gm., $33.00 a 
dozen. 

(The Bauer Chemical Company.) 

SANTYL. Yellowish, oily liquid, 
tasteless and nonirritant. Salicylic 
ester of pure sandalwood oil. 
Used in acute gonorrhoea and its 
complications. Dose, 30 drops, 
thrice daily. Bottle of y 2 oz., 
50c; capsules, box of 30, 50c; 

box of 100 $1.60 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

SCOPOLAMINE HYDROBROMIDE 
is identical with hyoscine hydro- 
bromide, but lower in price. 15 
grain tubes, each, $3.00; 10 grain 
tubes, $2.10; 5 grain tubes.. $1.05 

(Merck & Co. and C. F. Boehringer 
& Soehne.) 

SECACORNIN. (Ergotin roche.) 
Solution of the active principles 
four times the strength of fluid 
of ergot; sterile and standardized; 
extract of ergot; used as haemos- 
tatic, emmenagogue, oxytocic and 
circulatory equalizer, in doses of 
8 to 16 minims. Vials of 554 dr. 
(20 Cc.) 80c. 

SEXTONOL. Tablets consisting of 
a compound of duotonol, quinine 
tonol, iron tonal, manganese 
tonol and strychnine tonol. Blood 
and nerve nutrient. Dose, 1 to a 
5-grain tablets three times daily. 

Bottle of 100 75c. 

Infant's. Chocolated tablets 
each containing lime-tonol, 1 



grain; soda-tonol, 1 grain; iron- 
tonol, J4 grain; manganese-tonol, 
Ms grain; quinine-tonol, % grain 
and strychnine-tonol, 1/400 grain. 
A modified form of sextonal for 
use in paediatrics. Bottle of 

100 45c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

SIDONAL. (PlPERAZINE QUINATE.) 

White amorphous powder, readily 
soluble in water. Uric acid sol- 
vent in gout and allied affections 
in doses of 75 to 120 grains a 
day in divided doses, well diluted 

with water. 1 oz. bot $3-75 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

SIDONAL NEW. (Quinic acid an- 
hydride.) Same properties and 
uses as above. 1 oz. bot.... $2. 00 
(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

SILVER CITRATE. (Antiseptic 
Crede; Itrol.) White powder, 
soluble about 1 in 4000 of water. 
Recommended in Crede's treat- 
ment as an antiseptic for wounds, 
in lotion, ointment or powder. For 
disinfection of hands, skin and 
instruments, 1 to 1000-5000 wa- 
tery solution; as gargle 1 to 5000 
to 10,000; in gonorrhoea, 1 to 

8000. Oz $1.20 to $1.25 

(Schering & Glatz and Merck & 
Co.) 

SILVER LACTATE. (Actol.) 
Whitish powder, soluble in IS 
parts of water; recommended in 
solution 1 in 200 to 1000 as an 
antiseptic for surgical use. oz. 
and 1 oz. vials, per oz., $1.30; 
tablets, 3 grains, boxes contain- 
ing 5 vials of 10 tablets, per box, 

(Schering & Glatz and Merck & 
Co.) 

SOMATOSE. Light yellow, almost 
tasteless powder, easily soluble in 
water, prepared from meat and 
albumoses. Nitrogenous food prod- 
uct for the sick and convalescent. 
Dose for adults, 90 to 180 
grains daily; for children, 50 to 
100 grains. 2 oz. tins, per doz., 
$8.25; Vi lb. tins, per lb., $5.25; 
Jy 2 lb. tins_, per lb $5.00 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

SPIROFORM. White, crystalline 
powder, insoluble in water, but 
readily soluble in alcohol and 
other solvents. Odorless and prac- 



tically tasteless. Antirheumatic, 
analgetic, uric acid solvent 
Dose, 7J4 to 15 grains, three to 
five times daily. 25 Gm. cartons, 
75C-; iVi grain tablets, cartons 

of 50 75c 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 
SPIROSAL. (Monoglycol ester or 
salicylic acid.) Almost colorless 
and odorless fluid, easily soluble 
in alcohol, ether and chloroform, 
but slightly soluble in water; dis- 
solving in olive oil in the propor- 
tion of 1 to 8. Local antirheu- 
matic and analgetic. Used in pure 
state or in mixtures with olive 
oil or alcohol. 1 oz. bot., 55c. to 
65c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

STROPHANTHIN SOLUTION. Car- 
tons of 12 tubes, each containing 
1 Cc. of strophanthin, 1:1000. 
Used for intravenous injection in 
insufficiency of heart action. Car- 
tons 70c. 

(Boehringer & Soehne.) 

STYPTIC1N. (Cotarnine hydro- 
chloride.) Yellow amorphous 
powder, the salt of an opium ba»e 
(cotarnine is a product of the oxi- 
dation of narcotine), soluble in 
water and alcohol. Because of its 
chemical resemblance to hydras- 
tinine, it being methoxyldrastine, 
it is recommended in all forms of 
uterine haemorrhage. Used in 
functional dysmenorrhea and in 
the menorrhagia of puberty and 
the climacteric. Dose as styptic, 
i'A to 4 grains, as needed, per oe 
or by injection (10 per cent, solu- 
tion). Sugar coated tablets, 
grain, per tube of 20, 25c; 1 oz. 
bottles, per oz., $6.50; 54 oz. bot- 
tles, per oz., $6.60; Ms oz., per 
oz., $7.00; 15 grain vials, each, 
35c. hypodermic tablets, 
grain, per box of 40 (4 tubes), 

60c. 

(Merck & Co.) 
STYPTOL. (Cotarnine phtha- 
late. ) Yellow, crystalline pow- 
der, readily soluble in water. It 
is the phthalate salt of an opium 
base. Recommended in uterine 
haemorrhages in doses of 1 to 3 
grains; externally in 10 percent, 
solution. 1 oz. vials, $6.50; 
oz., per oz., $6.75.; Hi oz., per oz., 




SELL A BOTTLE OF 

ABSORBINE FOR $2.00 

and make $oc profit rather than sell the cheaper 
article with its 6 or yc profit. It requires no 
more time, paper or twine, but it does greatly 
increase your volume of business and annual 
profits. And in addition you have a satisfied 
customer who will buy ABSORBINE and other 
things from you year after year. 

ABSORBINE is constantly advertised in the 
prominent farm, stock and horse papers, and 
horse-owners everywhere are demanding AB- 
SORBINE. Are you getting your share of this 
business? Inquiries received at this office are 
referred to nearest druggist carrying the remedy 
in stock. Have ^ou reported? 

ABSORBINE is a mild, antiseptic, resolvent 
and discutient liniment for removing Bursal 
Enlargements, Bog Spavins, Thoroughpins, 
Puffs, Shoe Boils, Capped Hocks; healing cuts 
and bruises; curing strains, or sprains; stops 
lameness and allays pain. Does not blister or 
remove the hair and horse can be used. 

ABSORBINE TR. is ABSORBINE prepared 
for mankind and is a trustworthy household 
liniment. It has met with great success in re- 
ducing VARICOSE VEINS, VARICOCELE, 
GOITRE, ENLARGED GLANDS; healing ul- 
cers, wounds, sores; takes out soreness and in- 
flammation, allays pain. Put up in two sizes 
retailing at $1.00 4-oz. bottle and $2.00 ia-01. 
bottle. 

Imprinted pamphlets if you want them. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

49 Temple Street Springfield, Mass. 




( Get On the 
Profit Side of 
the Ledger 
For 1911 



You can help yourself do this by installing the .Match 
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International Vending Co., Dep't A, Chicago, 111. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when zvriting to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



71 



$7.00; 15 grain vials, per vial, 
35c; Yt. grain tablets, bottles of 
100, per bot., $1.20; tubes of 20 
tablets 25c; box of 5 tubes $1.20 

STYRACOL. (Guaiacol cinnamic 
ester.) White granular crystals, 
insoluble in water, readily soluble 
in alcohol. Given in phthisis, 
catarrh of the stomach and intes- 
tines in doses of 15 grains three 
to four times daily. 1 oz. car- 
tons, $1.20; 5 grain tablets, bot. 

of 100 $1.40 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

f 'JBLAMINE. (Mercuric ethylene- 
diamine sulphate.) Crystalline 
powder, containing 43 per cent, 
of mercury; very soluble in wa- 
ter. Used in solutions of 1 to 
1000 as a substitute for corro- 
sive sublimate. 1 oz. vials, 50c. ; 
tablets, 15 grains, 100 tablets in 
bottle, $1.10; 20 tablets in tube, 

5 tubes in box $1.60 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

SUPRARENALE. The astringent, 
haemostatic and pressor principle 
of the suprarenal substance; 1 
grain vials 80c. 

SUPRARENALE OINTMENT 
(1:1000). Collapsible tubes. .40c. 

SUPRARENALE SOLUTION 
(1:1000). A water-white, stable 
and non-irritating liquid prepara- 
tion of the active principle of the 
suprarenal glands. A powerful 
astringent and hxmostatic; used 
to prevent and control haemor- 
rhages, applied locally and given 
internally. Dose, 10 to 30 min- 
ims; 1 oz. vials 80c. 

SUPRARENALE TRITURATES. 
Each containing 0.00088 Gm. of 
suprarenalin, freely soluble. One 
triturate will make 15 minims of 
1:1000 solution. Tubes of 20, 

40c. each 

(Armour & Co.) 
TABLOGESTIN. The tablet form 
of ChoJogestin, which see. One 
size only (72 tablets). Dozen, 

$9.00 

(F. H. Strong Company.) 
TANNALBIN. (Tannin albumi- 
nate.) Pale brown, insoluble, 
tasteless powder, containing about 
50 percent, of tannin. It is not 
affected by the gastric juice, but 



is split up in the intestinal canal; 
hence is used as intestinal astrin- 
gent and for diarrhoea. Dose, 15 
to 30 grains three to five times 
daily. 1 oz. cartons, 85c; 5 
grain tablets, bot. of 100.... $1.00 
(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

TANNIGEN. (Acetyltannin.) Gray- 
ish powder, insoluble in water, 
soluble in alcohol; incompatible 
with alkalies which decompose it. 
Intestinal astringent in chronic 
diarrhcea and intestinal diseases 
of children. Adult dose, 3 to 10 
grains, three to six times daily; 
children, 1-3 to '/i that quantity. 
1 oz. bot., per oz 55c. to 75c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

TANNOPEE. (Hexamethyl-ene- 
tetramine tannin.) Brownish 
powder, insoluble in water, de- 
composed by alkalies; compound 
of tannin and urotropine, contain- 
ing 87 percent, of tannic acid. 
Intestinal astringent and disin- 
fectant. Adult dose, 10 to 15 
grains; children, 3 to 8 grains 
four times daily. 1 oz. cartons, 
per oz 55c. to 75c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

TESTADEN. Powdered extract of 
the testicle juice of animals. 
Used in impotency, neurasthenia 
and spinal irritation. Dose, 15 
grain three to four times daily. 
1 oz. vials, $1.30; 4 grain tablets, 

bot of 100 $'.30 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

THEOBROMINE. White crystalline 
powder, soluble in ether, but al- 
most insoluble in cold water or 
alcohol ; organic base obtained 
from seeds of Theobroma cacao. 
Diuretic in dropsy of cardiac and 
renal affections. Dose, 5 to 8 
grains. 1 oz. bot., per oz..ooc. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Merck & Co.) 

THEOBROMINE - SODIUM - SA- 
LICYLATE. White powder, very 
soluble in water, decomposed by 
acid solutions. Diuretic in dropsy 
of cardiac and renal origin. Dose, 
7 to 15 grains. 1 oz. bot., per 
oz 60c. 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
and Merck & Co.) 



THEOCE. Fine, colorless crystals; 
synthetic alkaloid of tea (theo- 
phylline) ; difficultly soluble in al- 
cohol and cold water, more easily 
in warm water; forms salts with 
alkalies. Powerful diuretic in 
doses of 3 to 6 grains, two to 
three times daily. "4 and 1 oz. 
bot., per oz $2.50 to $2.70 

(Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co.) 

THEOPHYLLIN. White crystalline 
needles, soluble in 226 parts of 
water. Identical with theocin, 
being the synthetic alkaloid of tea. 
Diuretic in doses of 4 to 8 grains. 
1 oz. vials, $1.40. Theophyllin 
sodium, 1 oz. vials, $1.50. Theo- 
phylline sodium salicylate, 1 oz. 

vials $1.10 

(C. F. Boehringer & Soehne.) 

THIGENOL. (Sodium oleo-sul- 
phonate.) Dark brown, thick 
liquid; odorless on use; slight 
empyreumatic taste; soluble in 
water, diluted in alcohol, glycerin 
and collodion; same uses as ich- 
thyol. Dose, 3 to 10 grains. 
1 oz. bots., per oz., 32c; 1 lb. 

tins, per lb $3-'o 

(Hoffman-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

THIOCOL. (Potassium guaiacol 
sulphonate.) White crystalline 
powder, soluble in water, slightly 
in alcohol and ether. Used in 
phthisis and similar diseases 
which require the creosote or gua- 
iacol treatment; nonirritating and 
readily assimilable. Dose, 5 to 20 
grains three times daily. 1 oz. 
bot., per oz., $1.00; tablets, 5 

grains each, 100 in bot $1.25 

Syrup, 6 oz. bots., per doz. .$7.00 
(Hoffman-La Roche Chemical 
Works.) 

THIOL. A dark brown liquid form- 
ing a sulphonated compound con- 
taining 12 percent, of sulphur. 
Recommended in the treatment of 
skin diseases, worms, rheumatism, 
gout, etc. Bottles containing 1 oz. 
liquid, 1 oz., 40c; y 2 lb. cans, 
yi lb., $4.90; J4-lb. cans, J4 lb., 

$500 

(Riedel & Company, New York.) 



IHIOSEAMIN. Colorless crystal*, 
soluble in water, alcohol and 
ether; used hypodermically for 
lupus and uterine affections ia 
doses of 1 to 3 grains in 15 per- 
cent, alcoholic or 10 percent, 
glycerinated water solution, one 
injection being given every three 
days; by the mouth, in capsules 
containing 'A to 3 grains. 1 oz. 
vials, per oz 60c. 

(Schering & Glatz and Merck & Co.) 

THYMOXOL. Alcoholic 1 percent 
solution of thymol containing 3 
percent, of hydrogen dioxide; 
miscible with water. Used in j 
or 10 percent, solutions as anti- 
septic and bacteriocide. % lb. 

bot., per lb $2.40 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

THYRADEN. Brownish powder; 
dried extract of sheep's thyroid, 
containing all the constituents of 
the gland. Used in myxcedema, 
obesity, goitre, psoriasis, eczema, 
menorrhagia and rickets. Dose, 
15 to 30 grains daily. 1 oz. vials, 
$1.30; 2 grain tablets, bot. of lao, 
75c. 

(Knoll & Co. and Merck & Co.) 

THYREOIDECTIN. Reddish pow- 
der obtained from the blood of 
animals deprived of the thyreoid 
gland. A remedy for exophthal- 
mic goitre. Dose, 5 to 10 grains. 
Capsules, 5 grains each, bot. of 

50 $1.3,5 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

THYROIDIN. Dried extract of 
sheep's thyroid, 1 part equaling 
6 parts of fresh gland. Used in 
myxcedema, creatinism, psoriasis, 
obesity, lupus, etc. Dose, ^ to 1 
grain, increased to 2 grains three 

times daily. 1 oz, bot .$1.25 

(Merck & Co.) 

TONOLS. Trade name adopted by 
Schering & Glatz for the glycero- 
phosphate salts. See under the 
name of the alkali earth or me- 
tallic base. 

TRIFERRIN. (Iron paranucleus 
ate.) Brownish-yellow powder, 
soluble in alkaline solutions, in- 
soluble in water. Said to con- 
tain 22 percent, of iron, 9 per- 
cent, of nitrogen and 2.5 per- 



FOR COMPARISON 

Get DOANE'S Prices Before 
Placing Your Order for .... 

SEIDLITZ POWDERS 

CHAS. R. DOANE, Seidlitz Powders Exclusively, 1193 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn, N Y. 



PHILADELPHIA 
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Tbe oldest, largest and best College ol Phar- 
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The College that educated DIehl. Ebert. Cob- 
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PHARMACY. A very complete course leading to the degree of P. D. (Dootor 1b 
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CHEMISTRY. Analytical, Pharmaceutical and Industrial, preparing the student for 
a professional career either as an Analyst or Teacher, or, as a Manufacturing Chemist. 

Bacteriological and Microscopical instruction whioh can be taken with the abovt 
courses will fit the student for all lines of Industrial Chemistry. 

COMMERCIAL TRAINING. A course of special value to the Pharmaoist. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. A new course for 1910-1911 under the direotion of a Pky- 
sician and a Physical Direotor. 

Store employment with College privileges easily seoured, P. C. P. students belnf 
always in demand. 

For full information regarding entrance requirements, tuition, etc. address, 

J. S. BEETEM, Registrar, 145 N. Tenth Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 



THEODOR LEONHARD 
WAX COMPANY 

Established 1S52 

SPECIALTIES: Pure White and Yellow 
Beeswax 

Specify "T. L." Brand Pure White Beeswax. Guaranteed 
under food and drugs act, June 30th, 1906. Serial No. 4068. 

Long Distance Tel. 466 
PATERSON, - NEW JERSEY 



SAL HEPATIGA 

The Original Effervescing Saline 
Laxative. Uric Acid Solvent. 

A combination of the Tonic, Alterative an<l 
Laxative Salts similar to the celebrated Bitter 
Waters of Europe, fortified by the addition of 
Lithia and Sodium Phosphate. It stimulates 
the liver, tones intestinal glands, purifies the 
alimentary tract, improves digestion, assimila- 
tion and metabolism. 

Especially valuable in 

Rheumaiism.Gout.Bilious Attacks and Constipation 

Most efficient in eliminating toxic products 
from intestinal tract or blood, and correcting 
vicious or impaired functions. 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLE 

BRISTOL-MYERS CO. 




Manufacturing Chemists 
277-279 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn - New York. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU 



GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



cent, of phosphorus. Used in 
anxmia, chlorosis and debility in 
dose of 5 grains three times daily, 
i oz. cartons, $1.00; 5 grain tab- 
lets, cartons of 50, 75c; solution 
(Triferrol), 8 oz. bot., per bot., 
SSc 

(C. Bischoff & Co. and Knoll & Co.) 

TRIKRESOL. Clear, colorless liquid; 
a mixture of ortho, meta and para 
cresols in the proportion of 35, 
40 and 25 percent., respectively. 
Corresponding to Creosol, U. S. 
P., viii; soluble in 40 parts of 
water. Said to have three times 
the germicidal power of carbolic 
acid. Solutions of from Yi to 1 
per cent, strength are recom- 
mended for surgical use; for in- 
ternal use 1 to 2 minims three 
times a day. 1 oz. vials, 15c; 1 

lb. bot 60c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

TRIOTONOL. Tablet consisting of 
5 grains duotonol and 1-60 grain 
strychnine-tonol. Nerve tonic. 
Dose, 1 to 2 tablets, thrice daily. 

Bottle of 100 tablets 75c. 

Infant's. Chocolated tablets 
each containing lime-tonol, 1 
grain; soda-tor.ol, 1 grain; strych- 
nine-tonol, 1-250 grain. Present 
the glycerophosphates for con- 
venient administration to children 
in cases of marasmus and mal- 
nutrition (rickets, etc.), in anae- 
mia and chlorosis, and in func- 
tional nervous disorders. Boltle 

of 100 45c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

T R I P H E N I N. (Pkopionylphen- 
etidin. ) White crystalline powder 
obtained by the action of propi- 
onic acid on paraphenetidine ; al- 
most insoluble in water (1 in 
2,000), more readily in alcohol 
and ether. Is a stro.ig antipy- 
retic, used in neuralgias and 
rheumatism in doses of 5 to 1 5 
grains three or four times daily. 
Tablets, 5 grains, bot. of 50, 65c; 

1 oz. cartons ..50c. 

(Merck & Co.) 

TROPACGCAINE HYDRO- 
CHLORIDE. (Benzoylpseudo- 
tropeike Hydrochloride.) Col- 
orless crystals, soluble in water. 



Local anaesthetic like cocaine, but 
said to be less deprcsa'n^r to the 
heart. Used hypodermically in i 
to 10 percent, solutions in 0.6 
per cent, solution of sodium chlo- 
ride. 5 grain vials, 40c; 15 grain 

vials 95c. 

(Merck & Co.) 

TUMENOL. Reddish - brown, oily 
paste, obtained from a bituminous 
rock deposit. Consists of a mix- 
ture of sulphonized hydrocarbons 
similar to ichthyol, and possess- 
ing similar properties, being anti- 
septic and healing in skin dis- 
eases, applied either as attenuated 
powder, 5 percent, ointment, or 
dissolved in ether and alcohol or 
water and glycerin. 

Ammonium. Black, viscid, oliy liq- 
uid, odorless; soluble in water 
and miscible with oils and fats. 
Used as antiseptic application 
in skin diseases, in form of oint- 
ment, paste or glycerin-ethereal 
solution painted on surface. 1 
oz. bottles 25c. 

Oil is a dark yellow fluid of thick 
consistency, having the same ap- 
plication as the foregoing. 

Powder. (Sulphotumenolic Acid.) 
Dark yellow powder, readily sol- 
uble in water. Used with equal 
parts of zinc starch paste in treat- 
ment of skin diseases. Paste, 1 
oz. jars, 55c; Yi lb. jar, $1.75; 
Yt lb. jar, $3.25. Oil, 1 oz. bot., 
65c; Ya. lb. bot., $3.25; 1 lb. bot., 

$6.30. Powder, 1 oz. tin .$1.10 

(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

UROSINE. (Lithium quinate.) Col- 
orless crystals, readily soluble in 
water. Used in gout, cystitis and 
uric acid diathesis. Supplied in 
effervescent tablets containing 
quinic acid, iYi grains; lithium 
carbonate, 154 grains; sugar, $y 2 
grains. Vial of 10, 50c; 25, 
$1.20. Powder, 1 oz. vial... 95c. 
(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

URITONE. White crystalline pow- 
der; a product of formaldehyde 
and ammonia, of the same com- 
position and properties as hexa- 
methylene tetramine; used in 
treatment of purulent conditions 
of the urine, cystitis, etc., in 



doses of 5 to 15 grains. 1 oz. 
vials, 60c; 5 grain capsules, per 
bot. of 100, 65c; compressed tab- 
lets, jY* B rs - each, per bot. of 

100 85c. 

(Parke, Davis & Co.) 

UROTROPIN. (Hexamethylene- 
tetramine.) Colorless granular 
crystals, with an alkaline reaction; 
readily soluble in water. Urinary 
antiseptic in cystitis, bacteruria, 
phosphaturia, gout, rheumatism, 
irritable bladder, etc., used also 
before and after instrumentation 
to forestall urinary infection. 
Dose, 5 to 15 grains. 1 oz. vials, 
boa; lb., $7.50; tablets, 7Y2 grains 
each, 20 tablets in box, 25c; 5 
grains each, 30 tablets in box, 25c. 
(Schering & Glatz.) 

UROTROPIN METHYLENE 
CITRATE. (Newurotropin.) 
Crystals resembling urotropin and 
having same therapeutic indica- 
tions, though dose is double, be- 
ing 15 grains three times daily. 
1 oz. vials, 60c; tablets, jYi 
grains, 20 tablets in box, per 

box 25c. 

(Schering & Glatz.) 

VALIDOL. (Valeric acid menthyl 
ester.) Colorless liquid, a com- 
bination of valeric acid and men- 
thol; insoluble in water, readily 
soluble in alcohol. Used in hys- 
teria and neurasthenia in doses 
of 10 to 15 drops three times 
daily. Vials, 10 Gm., 50c; 25 
Gm., $1.20; pills, 25 in bot., each, 
50c. 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

VALIDOL CAMPHOR ATE. Color- 
less liquid, insoluble in water, 
readily soluble in alcohol and 
oils. A 10 per cent, solution of 
camphor in validol. Used in 
toothache by local application and 
internally in same indications and 
dose as validol. Vials, 10 Gin. 

each., 50c; 25 Gm $1.20 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

VALISAN. (Bromo-isovaleric-acid- 
borneolester.) Colorless oily 
liquid soluble in organic solvents. 
It is a sedative and analeptic of 
mild odor and superior to the 
other products of its group. Used 



in all conditions of nervousnew. 
bose, 5 to 10 drops several timet 
a day. Pearls of Yt Gm., box 
of 25 65c 

VALYL. (Valeric acid di et h r- 
lamide.) Colorless, oily liquid, 
with a valerian odor and burning 
taste, supplied only in gelatin 
capsules, each containing a 
grains. Nerve sedative used in 
hysteria, neurasthenia, hypochon- 
driasis, and in neuralgia and men- 
strual disturbances, in doses of 
2 or 3 capsules two or three timet 
daily. Bot. of 50 capsules. . .90c. 
Pearls. 25 soft pearls in bot.. 40c. 
(Victor Koechl & Co.) 

VERONAL. White crystalline pow- 
der, soluble in 150 parts of cold 
and 12 parts of boiling water. 
Hypnotic in simple sleeplessness 
and the insomnia of mania. Dote, 
5 to 15 grains, dissolved in bot 
fluids. 1 oz. bot. and cartons, 
per oz., $1.60; tablets, 5 grains 
each, tube of 10, 30c; bot. of 

100 $2.25 

(Merck & Co. and Farbenfabriken 
of Elberfeld Co.) 

VIOFORM. (Iodochloroxy chino- 
line.) Greenish-yellow powder, 
insoluble in water. Used in same 
way as iodoform, than which it it 
six times lighter and bulkier. 

1 oz. cartons $1.15 

(C. Bischoff & Co.) 

XANOL. White powder, very sol- 
uble in water; decomposed Dy 
acids. A chemical compound of 
caffeine, sodium and sodium sali- 
cylate. Used as a vasomotor 
heart tonic, its indirect action be- 
ing to promote free diuresis. 

ioz. cartons $1.00 

(The Wm. S. Merrell Chemical 
Company.) 

XEROFORM. (Tribromphenol 
bismuth.) Yellow, insoluble pow- 
der, containing bismuth oxide 
and tribromphenol in nearly equtl 
proportions. A powerful bacteri- 
cide used in place of iodoform at 
a dressing for wounds and inter- 
nally as an intestinal antiseptic 
in doses of 5 to 20 grains. 1 oz. 

vials 50c. 

(The Heyden Chemical Works.) 



The best dental cleanser in 
the world for you and 
your children 

DR. SHEFFIELD'S 
CREME DENTIFRICE 



Common Sense 
Rat and Roach 
Exterminators 



25c SIZE, $2.00 PER DOZEN DELIVERED 



It's a Good Seller Because It Does the Work 



COMMON SENSE MFG. CO., BUFFALO, N. Y. 



INSULATION counts most in an 

ICE CREAM CABINET 

ARCTIC STEEL ICE CREAM CABINETS 

are insulated with 2- F*l IRE CORK. 



Entirely constructed oi Non-Rustable Steel. 
Use less ice than any other cabinet. Do 
not leak, swell or waterlog. All sizes. 

A catalogue for the asking. 

C. DOERING & SOI\F 



LAKE and SHELDON STS. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 




AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 



73 



TRAD tz. MARK 



LANOLINE " l,ebre,ch 

LANOLINE 



fV^OT I_,Ar\HJJL,ir\IH; / Hydpoua 

. f JK AD EPS LAN \E B. J. D. ) Anhydrous 

S^m^/ 1 "DARTRING " BRAND TRADE MARK 

Made by the VERE1NIGTE CBEMISCHE WERKE AKTIENGESELLSCHArT 

"DARTRING" Vermals BENNO JAFFE & DARMSTAt DTER 

CHARLOTTENBURG-BERl I IM 

Insist upon receiving the original and reliable product. Look for the Trade Mark and refuse all 
cheaper and impure substitutes. Send for new prices in effect October 1st. 

GENERAL DRUG COMPANY, 14-16 Vcsey St., New York 

Sole Agents for the United States "DARTRING'* 





ovm 



SALI]^ 




LP* 



iciures. 




Lion's 

We Give You toe flBft OF 1 THE PROFIT 




Share 

We want all dealers in post cards to investigate our line which consists of the largest line post cards of every description, comprising in 
general. Birthday and Greetings, Valentines, St. Patrick, Easter, Season Cards and Fancy Cards. Prices always the lowest. 

SAMPLE LINE " A "—Consisting ol Birthdays. Greetings SAMPLE LINE "B"-ConsIstIng ol Valentine. Easter. Wash* 
and Comic cards, to retail at lc.— 2 lor Sc. and 5c sellers. Ington. and St. Patrick cards, tor the year 1911. to retail 
1000 cards lor $6.75. Express prepaid. at lc. 2 lor 5c. and 5c each. 1000 cards $5.25. Eipnss (rtRlll. 

REMEMBER: 'THE LION'S SHARE OF THE PROFIT FOR YOU 

«J. BOUTON & CO., Inc., ^Wl^hi^r New York 




Mr. Dealer— 2,500,000 women will read about the E. BURNHAM TOILET PREPARA- 
TIONS, in our MID-WINTER advertising campaign in the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL— 
BHTTERICK — STANDARD —NEW IDEA AND PICTORIAL REVIEW— FASHION 
QUARTERLIES— and in DRESS AND VOGUE. 

FOR THREE MONTHS THESE QUARTERLIES WILL BE A CONSTANT 
SOURCE OF REFERENCE FOR THE BUYING WOMAN. Are you in a position to get 
your share of the business? Write to-day for our helps and order blank, and take advantage 
of our offer of FREE goods. 

$5.00 worth of FREE goods, of your own selection, with a $50.00 net order, or $2.50 FREE 
goods with a $25.00 net order, providing your order is placed before Feb. 15th, ign. Send your 
order to-day, for shipment any time before Feb. 15th. 

Terms 10% less list prices, 2% cash, — 60 days net. 



[Note — We have a beautiful Decalcomania Transfer window sign, 15x12 in., showing three 
preparations in colors, and reads, "We sell E. Burnliam's Toilet Preparations," which 
upon request, and agreement to place the sign either on your window or 



will be sent 

showcase. 



E. BURNHAM, 67 and 69 E. Washington Street, Chicago, Dept. C 119 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



74 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



American Druggist "WANTS" Page 



This department is intended to be used as a medium for the exchange or sale of stores, the employment of clerks, and th« 
•ecuring of situations. The price for each insertion of fifty words or less is $1.00; two cents being charged for each additional 
word. Remittance to cover the number of insertions desired must accompany the order. Do not send money in unregistered In- 
ters, as the publishers are not responsible for loss. Please send cheques or post office orders payable to the AMERICAN DRUG- 
GIST PUBLISHING COMPANY, 62 to 68 West Broadway, New York. 

The American Druggist is issued on the second and fourth Mondays of each month, and copy must be in the New York 
office at least six days in advance of publication. 



SITUATIONS vacant 



WE WANT two or three more good sales- 
men. Men with established trade in the East- 
ern or Middle States can make immediate and 
permanent connection either on salary or com- 
mission. Ours is a first class pharmaceutical 
and specialty line. Hinton Chemical Co , 147- 
149 Cator Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



SALESMEN calling on the retail drug trade 
to solicit orders for inlaid linoleum floor cover- 
ing. Excellent ccmmission arrangement. Feni- 
more & Co., Trenton, N. J. 

CHEMIST WANTED— Experienced and re- 
liable pharmaceutical chemist. Must be re- 
liable and worthy of advancement. Excep- 
tional opening. State age, experience, lin^ 
you excel in and full particulars. Location. 
Central West. Address "Cardamom," care of 
American Druggist. 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



SITUATION WANTED — By pharmacist; 
graduate; registered in Kentucky; twenty-seven 
years of age; seven years' experience; refer- 
ences. H. B. E., ?y 2 N. Third St., Newark, 
Ohio. 



WANTED — Position by licensed pharmacist. 
Twenty years' experience, good references, 
moderate salary, American, married, all-State 
license. Address Pharmacist, 123 Fulton St.. 
Auburn, N. Y. 



STORES FOR SALE 



DRUG STORE— Illinois city of 12,000; best 
location, corner of square; stock, soda foun- 
tain and fixtures invoice about $4,500; will 
consider partner; owner going West for health. 
Low rent, long lease. Full particulars given. 
Answer if you have the money and mean 
business. Address W. E. Parker, Carbondale, 
111. 



NATHAN'S FOOT SPECIALTIES 




FOOT WITQ 
ARCH 
SUPPORT 



The arch of the foot Is 
held together by various 
sets of ligaments whose 
tendency is to droop and 
weaken. This causes pain 
in the muscles of feet and 
ankles, and often extend- 
ing to calf, knee, hip and 
back. 

The relief Is simply by 
the insertion in the shoe of 
NATHAN'S FLEXIBLE-CUSH.ONED 
NO-METAL ARCH SUPPORT 



It is easily adjusted to any shoe and 
flexes readily with tne muscles of the 
foot. 

Equipped with Nathan's Arch Supports, 
anyone can enjoy walking without the 
slightest annoyance from sore feet. The 
supports should be worn by everyone, to 
protect the arch, if it be strong, and to 
relieve and strengthen it, if it be weak. 

For Weak Ankles use 

NATHAN'S PATENT VENT L- 

ATING CORSET ANKLE 

SOPPORT 

Good for sprained 
ankles, children learn- 
ing to walk. 
Skating and Athletics. Are recommended 
by surgeons and physicians. 

Send for booklet N.Y.M., on our various 
ankle supports, arch supports, heel cush- 
ions, etc. It tells a simple method to 
find out whether or not you have a fall- 
ing arch or flat foot. FREE on request. 
NATHAN NOVELTY CO., 86 Reade St.. NEW Y8R'< 




STORES FOR SALE 



HERMAN HENRY BREUER, i 4 g Broad- 
way, Singer Building, New York City. Hon- 
est Business Bfoker and 1892 Graduate New- 
York College Pharmacy; Department Phar- 
macy, Columbia University. 

FLORIDA DRUG STORE, located in one 
of Florida's best towns. Receipts $50 to $73 
daily; inventory, $9,950; price, $9,000; low- 
est amount cash down, $4,500. Florida has an 
ideal climate year around. BREUER. 

PROTECT YOURSELF with Breuer]s Free 
Affidavit System which eliminates misrepre- 
sentations. Gratuitous listing and advertising. 

BREUER. 

DRUG STORE— Fine location, doing good 
cash business; long lease; no old stock; general 
running expenses very small; store is a money 
maker; owner has best of reasons for selling; 
worth $4,000; for a quick deal, $3,700. Ad- 
dress W. Klett, 16 Doubleday St., Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. 

DRUG STORES (SNAPS) FOR SALE in 
every State of the United States and Canada 
and positions for drug men anywhere in United 
States or Canada. F. V. Kneist, 542 Bee 
Bldg., Omaha, Neb. Established 1904. 

ASSIGNEE'S SALE— I have for sale under 
the order of court a stock of drugs and fix- 
tures and furniture of a drug store in the 
best locality for business in the city of Val- 
paraiso, Porter County, Ind. The business is 
a live and going one and has been located at 
its present place for more than twenty-five 
years. Call and examine invoice and get terms; 
E. T. Gardner, Assignee. Valparaiso. Ind. 



ECLIPSE TOOTHACHE GUM 
$3.00 a Gross 

Buyers' imprint on Gross orders, 
or four Oross for $10.00 delivered. 

ECLIPSE TOOTHACHE GUM CO. 

361 W. Utka St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

CHR. HANSEN'S DANISH DAIRY 

PREPARATIONS and JUNKET PREPARATIONS 

Butter Color, Rennet Tablets, Cheese 
Color Tablets, Junket Tablets. Junket 
Brand Buttermilk Tablets, Junket Brand 
Colors and Junket Brand Flavors. 

Manufactured by Chr. Hansen s Laboratory 
LITTLE FALLS, N. Y. 

SEE QUOTATIONS IN PRICES CURRENT 




[ILL 




THE ORIGINAL 




FLY PAPER 



For 25 years the Standard 
in Quality. 

ALL OTHERS ARE IMITATIONS 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



PARTICIPATION— Chemist. Ph. D., wno 
has inventive ability and large experience in 
pharmaceutical and allied branches, wishes to 
take active and financial interest in legitimate, 
well [laying business. Address E. A., care of 
American Druggist. 

WANTED — Jobbers in Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut, Delaware. District of Columbia, 
Maine. Maryland. New Hampshire, New Jer- 
sey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, 
Vermont, and Detroit. Mich., to sell SODA 
FOUNTAINS. Exclusive territory. Excellent 
proposition. Leading manufacturer. Write 
for particulars. P. O. Box 135, Decatur, 111. 



FOR SAFE — An old established drug busi- 
ness in Central New York State is now offered 
for sale to settle an estate; daily sales about 
$100; no fountain or side lines; investment 
about $14,000; a good business for two; a 
rare opportunity. Joslyn & McAuliff, Wieting 
Block, Syracuse. N. Y. 

STORE TO LET— Excellent location for 
drug store. S. E. Cor. Crotona Ave. and Fair- 
mount Place. Inquire of janitor or A. Rosen- 
berg, 219 East Fortieth St. 

WANTED — An iceless counter fountain, 8 
by 10 ft. .fountain. What have you to offer? 
Address J. L. Talbott. Ladd. 111. 

SIDE LINE OF FINE BOX CANDIES 
wanted by a traveling salesman to the drug 
trade in New York State who has a wide and 
profitable acquaintance among leading pharma- 
cists. Only a first class line will be taken. 
Can furnish best references. Correspondence 
invited. Address Candy, care of American 
Druggist. 




LOE8ER'? 

Reliable Iceless Soda Fountain 

In Prominent New York Pharmacies 

Reliable 
Dependable 
Practical 
Low Prices 
Easy Terms 

H. G. LOEBER CO. 
151 East 126th St. New York 



FOB elisDilnc 
everything about 
s drug store or a 
soda fountain tbers 
Is nothing equal t» 
Hoffman's 

Barkeeper's Friend 

Marble, Glass, 

Nickel, Brass, 
Copper, Tin and 
German Silver 

can all be cleaned 
and polished with It 
easier than with 
anything else. Let 
us send you a 
FREE SAMPLE. 



ONCE TRIED, ALWAYS USED. 

T' 




1 BAR FIXTURES, 
DRAIN BOARDS! 

AND ALL 

j Tin, Zinc, Brass, Copper, f 
I Nickel and all Kitchen and [ 

Plated Utensils. 
I Class. Wood, Marble, Por- j 
celain. Etc. 




Highest Award, 
Chicago World's 
Fair, 1883. Louis- 
iana Purchase Kx- 
position, St. 
Louis, Me.. 1904. 



SEP. WH. HOFFMAN 

m t watsiirtsa Ml; 

• I SIS* I M 

FOR SALE BY JOBBING TRADE. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



73 



DRUGGISTS 

are often asked for an antiseptic 
MOUTH WASH that they can guar- 
antee is FREE FROM ACID. Such 
a preparation is 

LYTHOL 

Serial No. 2508 
Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30th, 
1906 

It preserves the teeth by preventing 
decay. Allays inflammation and ca- 
tarrhal conditions of the mucous 
membranes of the Eye, Nose, Mouth 
and Throat. Relieves Sore Throat 
and Hoarseness. 



CARPINE 
NAPTHO-SULPHUR CREAM 

is now being advertised extensively 
and persistently to the medical profes- 
sion as a local application in all forms 
of skin affections. 

Druggists should see that a suffi- 
cient quantity is kept in stock, in order 
to meet the demand that must accrue 
from this constant advertising. 

Being composed of beta-napthol 
and sulphur — two of the most power- 
ful parasiticides — you can recommend 
it with enthusiasm in all diseases of 
both scalp and skin. 

Car pine Naptho-Sulphur Cream 
can be secured through the jobbing 
trade, generally 



FOR SALE BY ALL JOBBERS 

....OR.... 

HUDSON & COMPANY, Inc., Manufacturing Chemists, 148-151 West 36th Street, NEW YORK 



Ehrlieh-Hata 606 

DIOXYDIAMIDOARSENOBENZOL 

This Great Triumph of Experimental 
Medicine which has excited such Intense 
and Universal interest, and 

173 OTHER INTRODUCTIONS TO MEDICINE 

from July, 1909, to June, 1910, are 
described in 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST HANDY GUIDE No. 8 



Sent Post Paid for 5 cents 



American Druggist Publishing Co. 

66 West Broadway, New York 



DR. KIESOW'S 
ESSENCE 

THE GREAT GERMAN TONIC 



(From the Original Formula dis- 
covered by Dr. Kiesow in 1760) 

UNGERER & CO. 

Sole Agents 

273 Pearl Street, New York. 

22 Fifth Avenue, Chicago, III. 
514 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
244 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



76 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




KELENE 

Pure Chloride of Ethyl 

FOR LOCAL AND GENERAL 

ANAESTHESIA 

Manufacturers : 

FRIES BROS. 

92 Reade Street :: NEW YORK 

Sole Distributors for the United States : 

MERCK & CO. 

New York Rahway, N. J. St Lonis 

Literature sent upon request 




ts« 



We are selling more No. 254's to-day 
than ever before. Why? Ask the man 
who owns one. 

You will find the same careful work- 
manship on our Counter Scales that is no- 
ticeable on our Rx Scales. 

SPECIAL. We have a few old style Tor- 
sions — capacities ten to twenty-five pounds 
Avoirdupois. Mechanically correct, but 
old patterns, for sale at greatly reduced 
prices while they last. 

Write for our New Catalogue 

THE TORSION BALANCE COMPANY 

Factory and Shipping Addreaa : 
147-9 EIGHTH STREET. JERSEY CITY. N. J. 
Offices 92 READE STREET. NEW YORK CITY 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 




vr . nc. 



wvEH8rrvoFiujw» m <^ ^ 



^meriGD leading Dru^ Journal." 



Fbundcd, 
571 



Vol. LVIII, No. 3. 
Whole No. 708. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 13, 1911. 



CHICAGO. 



40th Year 
Semi-Monthly 



SUPRACAPSULIN 

Solution 1-1000 

A superior solution of the Active Principle of the Suprarenal Gland 
Permanency Guaranteed. Reliable at all Times 
THE CUDABY PACKING CO. 

NEW YORK Pharmaceutical Dept. CHICAGO 

BOSTON SOUTH OMAHA. NEB. SAN FRANCISCO 

CARMEN COMPLEXION POWDER 

it one of the best advertised toilet preparations on the 
American market, and one which gives invariable satis- 
faction to its users. Distributed through the wholesale 
drug trade. Free sampling through the mail for dealers 

on request. Price, $4.00 per dozen. 
STAFFORD-MILLER CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



1 Sanatoaen 



THE FOOD-/TONIC 



1 



Unequalled in prestige. 
Heavily and broadly advertised. 
A high grade profitable article lor any druggist 
BAUER CHEMICAL CO , Everett Building, New 



YorkH 



Send for my 

V PROFIT 
* PLAN 

and let me have your list 



Established 1887 






1475 MICHIGAN AVE. 
CHICAGO 



Mrs. GRAHAM'S 

Hair Color 
Kosmeo Cream 
Kosmeo Face Powder 
Face Bleach 
Bonalaxa 

Cactico Hair Tonic 
Etc., Etc., Etc. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

and 



Italian Medicines and Specialties 

J. PERSONENI, 496-498 West Broadway, New York 



ASK FOR CATALOGUE 



WEBB'S ALCOHOL. 

THE ACKNOWLEDGED STANDARD 
JAMES A. WEBB ® S0N t 50-52 Stone Street (Hanover Square), New TorK City 



CROWN 
FRUIT PRODUCTS 

are in a class of their own 

Quality brings "Trade." Trade brings "Dollars." 
Quality is our only claim for your order. 

CROWN CORDIAL & EXTRACT CO 

18 Desbrosses St., New York City 



Index and Buyers' Guide, Pages 8, 9 and 41. 



2 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Sell the Goods 

IS YOUR WAY TO MAKE 
THE PROFIT. 

Wine of Cardui 



Will sell in large quantities and 
your profits are good. 

For cash it costs only $7.60 per dozen 
in $30 lots. 

$6.84 per dozen in $100 lots. 



CHATTANOOGA MEDICINE CO. 

CHATTANOOGA. ST. LOUIS. 



WE ARE HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

INSECT POWDER 
PRESSED HERBS 
Powdered and Ground Drugs 
Pharmaceuticals In Bulk 

ALLAIRE, WOODWARD & CO. 

Pharmaceutical Chemists and Drug Mfflers 
PEORIA, ILLINOIS 




(PerleS) are 



$o.oo 



ALWAYS RELIABLE 
ALWAYS UNIFORM 
ALWAYS PROFITABLE 
Price to the Trade - - - • 

ALL JOBBERS 

Largely advertised in Medical Journals 
13/>e MERZ CAPSULE CO.. Detroit. Mich. 



3 



PEI 

DOZ. 



Your Doctor buys them 

from Somebody. Why not from You? 




102 tubes assorted 
Only good sellers 

THE handsome case is 
an eloquent salesman. 
No argument needed. 
Regular retail trade price 
$10.60 net. Much better 
in quantity. Write now and 
we will tell you all about it. 

Sharp & Dohme 



Chicago 
St. Louis 



Baltimore 
Philadelphia 
New York 



Atlanta 
New Orleans 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



3 



MORE PROFIT FROM YOUR FOUNTAIN 

1" Take advantage of the demand for "Stecro" Bouillon Cubes. 

1" Serve Steero Bouillon at your fountain and add to its profit. 
This will also increase your SALES of 

"STEERO" 

LTRADE-MARK] 

BOUILLON CUBES 

Made by American Kitchen Products Company, New York. 

1" They sell quickly after one trial because everybody likes 
Steero Bouillon for its delicious flavor and great convenience. 

^1 Send for samples and try them yourself. Write for our 

SPECIAL OFFER 

Distributed and Guaranteed by 

Schieffelin & Co., 202 William St., New York. 

peter moller's 
Cod Liver Oil 

is a pure oil, free from disagreeable taste 
and odor. It digests readily, does not 
cling to the palate, and never "repeats". 

flit is made and bottled by Peter Moller at 
the Norway fisheries. 

Not sold in bulk. You know you 
get the genuine when you receive the 
flat oval bottle bearing the name of 

Schieffelin & Co., New York, Sole Agents. 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



4 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



BIG PROFIT FOR DRUGGISTS! 

Show Case Assortment 

No. 2500 

$25.00 F. 0. B. New York 

Goods Retail for $45.55 



Davids' Inks require no comment. They have 
been the standard for more than 85 years. The 
above extraordinary offering of a practically 
complete line of our goods has been made pos- 
sible by a rounding up of broken package lots. 
Besides, as an extra inducement, we will give, 
for a limited time, FREE, an ornate show case 
like the accompanying cut. The net cost of assortment — see regular retail 
prices mentioned below — including show case, is $25.00 F.O.B., New York. 




New 

Catalogue 

Number Quantity 

1 i- 12 doz. Quarts Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

2 1-12 doz. Pints Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

3 i-6 doz. 1-2 Pints Electro Chemical Blue Black Writing 

Fluid 

6 1-2 doz. 4-0Z. Square Electro Chemical Blue Black Writ- 
ing Fluid 

io 3 doz. 2-oz. Square Electro Chemical Blue Black Writ- 
ing Fluid 

130 1-12 doz. Quarts Combined Writing and Copying Ink. 

131 1-12 doz. Pints Combined Writing and Copying Ink... 

132 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Combined Writing and Copying Ink 
135 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Desk Combined Writing and Copying Ink 

80 1-12 doz. Quarts Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid 

81 1-12 doz. Pints Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid 

82 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writing 

Fluid " 

88 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Square Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writ- 
ing Fluid 

90 3 doz. 2-oz. Square Raven's Black (Jet Black) Writ- 
ing Fluid 

196 1-12 doz. Quarts Non-copying Carmine Ink 

195 1-12 doz. Pints Non-copying Carmine Ink 

194 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Non-copying Carmine Ink 

193 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Non-copying Carmine Ink 

191 1-2 doz. 2-oz. Square Non-copying Carmine Ink 

255 1-12 doz. Quarts Blue Writing Ink 

256 1-12 doz. Pints Blue Writing Ink 

357 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Blue Writing Ink 

261 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Blue Writing Ink 

265 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Blue Writing Ink 

296 1-12 doz. Quarts Green Writing Ink 

397 1-12 doz. Pints Green Writing Ink 

298 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Green Writing Ink 

302 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Green Writing Ink 

306 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Green Writing Ink 

276 1-12 doz. Quarts Violet Writing Ink 

■277 1-12 doz. Pints Violet Writing Ink 



Goods 


Retail 


Re- 


Price, tail 


Each 


for 


.60 


.60 


•35 


.35 


.20 


.40 


.10 


.60 


• 05 


1.80 


.80 


.80 


.50 


•50 


• 35 


• 35 


.10 


.60 


.60 


60 


•35 


■33 


.20 


.20 


.10 


.60 


.05 


I. So 


1.25 


1-25 


•75 


•75 


.40 


• 4° 


.20 


.60 


• 15 


.90 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 


.20 


.20 


.10 


•30 


.05 


.60 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 


.20 


.20 


. 1 0 


•30 


•05 


.60 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 



New 

Catalogue 

Number Quantity 

278 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Violet Writing Ink 

282 i-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Violet Writing Ink 

286 x doz. 2-oz. Square Violet Writing Ink 

240 1-4 doz. 4-oz. Square Oriental Red Ink 

242 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Oriental Red Ink 

401 1 doz. 2-oz. Liquid Glue 

410 1 doz. 1-2 oz. Rubber Stamp Ink — Assorted Colors.... 
0 1 doz. Rubber Stamp Pads — Assorted Colors 

429 i doz. New Black Diamond Indelible Marking Outfit.. 

330 1-2 doz. 2-oz. Letterine Show Card Ink — Black 

347 1 -a doz. 2-oz. Letterine Show Card Ink — Assorted Colors 

375 1-2 doz. i-oz. White Writing Ink 

361 1-4 doz. i-oz. Gold Writing Ink 

58 1-12 doz. Quarts Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen 

Ink 

57 1-12 doz. Pints Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen 

Ink 

56 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain 

Pen Ink 

55 1-6 doz. 3-0Z. Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen Ink 
54 1-6 doz. 4-oz. Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain Pen Ink 
52 1 doz. 2-oz. Square Silk Filtered Perfumed Fountain 
Pen Ink 

350 1-12 doz. Quarts Black Marking Ink 

525 1-12 doz. Quarts General White Paste 

524 1-12 doz. Pints General White Paste 

519 1-2 doz. 4-oz. Tip Top White Paste, Water Well 

518 1-2 doz. 3-0Z. Jar White Paste 

517 1 doz. 2-oz. Jar White Paste 

516 1 doz. 3-oz. Tubes White Paste 

477 1-12 doz. Quarts Security Mucilage 

478 1-12 doz. Pints Security Mucilage 

479 1-12 doz. 1-2 Pints Security Mucilage 

488 1 doz. 4-oz. Desk General Mucilage 

490 1 doz. 2-oz. Round General Mucilage 

6 1 Pound Scarlet Sealing Wax — 4 Sticks to pound.... 
6 1 Pound Scarlet Sealing Wax — 20 Sticks to pound... 
1 doz. Boxes Fancy Perfumed Sealing Wax — Assorted 
Colors — 3 Sticks in box 

Goods retail for 

Complete weight of Assortment and Showcase 4(10 lbs 



Retail 


Goods 


Price, 


Retail 


Each 


for 


.20 


.20 


.10 


•3° 


• 05 


60 


• 15 


■45 


.05 


.60 


.10 


1.30 


.10 


1 .20 


.10 


1 .20 


• 25 


3-«o 


.10 


.60 


.10 


.60 


.10 


.60 


■ 25 


•75 


1.25 


1.35 


•75 


•75 


.40 


•4» 


•25 


•SO 


• 25 


•50 


. 1 0 


1.30 


•35 


■35 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•3S 


•>5 


■90 


.10 


.60 


•°S 


.60 


.10 


1.20 


.60 


.60 


•35 


•35 


.20 


.20 


. 1 0 


1.20 


•t>5 


60 


.20 


.80 


05 


1. 00 


'5 


1 8( 




$45 5 



Thaddcus Davids Co 



95-97 Van Dam Street, 

Established 1825 



New York, U. S. A. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



5 



Use a Becker 




30 Days 

never be without one 




Something you cannot afford to do without. 
Makes soda water better and cheaper. 



What it is — and what it does 



It makes carbonated water cheaper 
and better than you can make it by 
any other process. 
It is compact, convenient and cleanly. 
Absolutely "Fool Proof." No com- 
plicated, corrosive, contaminating 
pumps or other devices. 
Only 22 inches high and 15 inches 
wide. 

Electrically operated, 16 C. P. all 
that is required. 

No hose or other movable connec- 
tions to get out of order. 



Produces absolutely uniform, air- 
free, carbonated water. Twelve 
gallons an hour capacity. 
The multi-plane atomizer thoroughly 
mixes the gas and water. Do not 
confound the "Sodamaker" with 
ordinary carbonators — it's different 
— better. 

You can increase the capacity at any 
time without buying a new machine. 

Absolutely automatic, self-starting 
and stopping. 

You try it at our risk. 



Just Sign and 
Mail This 30 day 
Trial Offer J 



Only $100 ^ 



— think of it, and 
saves you 86 
cents on every tank of soda used. 



PRICES 
Direct Current Equipment .... $100.00 
Alternating Current Equipment . . 110.00 

Terms: $10.00 a month until paid for. 

No strings to this offer — 

you just sign and mail the Trial Offer 
blank— and we ship the Sodamaker. Use 
it 30 days — if satisfied pay us $10 and 
$ 1 0 a month until paid for — if not, return it 

K/f fiECKER Company 

^j ^L— — , , c-c r INDEPENDENT 30OA FOUNTAIN FACTORY 

/A/ TMC WORLD ^^^^^^^ 

226 2 S. HALSTED ST. CHICAGO 





Don't pay us a cent until you use 
it 30 days. If satisfied 
^Hk pay us $10 and $10 
J a month until paid 

^t—l°l-- 




.1911. 



L. A. Becker Company, Chicago 



Ship me (us) on or about 

one Becker "Sodamaker" 

Specfy voltage J D.rect current voltage 

and alternates \ AUernating current ._ volts cycIes 

on the following conditions: 

I Iwel agree at the expiration of the thirty '30) day trio, 
period to deliver the carbonator to you in good condition or pay 
for it as follows: $1000 cash, balance covered by monthly notes 
of $1000 each, bearing interest at 6*. Total price to be: direct 
current machine, $100.00, alternating current, $110.00. 



Name 

Address 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




Satisfy Yourself 

Better Quality 
More Profit 



" On what basis do you solicit my order? " 

This was the inquiry addressed to one of 
our salesmen by the buyer for a large firm 
that has a big soda water business. 

" On the basis that J. Hungerford Smith Co. 's 
'TRUE FRUIT' Syrups and Crushed Fruits 
are the standard of quality and that it is econ- 
omy for you to use them," was the answer. 

" That interests me : I am not posted on the sub- 
ject. Can you prove your statement? " 

" Yes sir, by actual test and comparison with 
other goods. ' ' 

The test was made and the buyer decided to 
purchase J. Hungerford Smith Co.'s "TRUE 
FRUIT '.' flavors exclusively in future. It did 
not take long to satisfy him that they were much 
finer in flavor and quality and more uniform. 

If you are not using "TRUE FRUIT" Syrups 
and Crushed Fruits you owe it to yourself to 
make this test; it's very simple and convinc- 
ing. Write us and we will tell you about it, or 

Ask Your Jobber 

J. HUNGERFORD SMITH CO. 

Manufacturers "TRUE FRUIT" SODA FOUNTAIN REQUISITES 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



NEW YORK OFFICE: 

27 East 226 Street 
M. J. Root, Manager 




H. T. HAINTZ, Western Mgr 
Dwight Building 
Kansas City, Mo. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



7 




tatity r-ouulaill 





HERE is something about 
a Becker-Iceless — a subtle, 
indefinable quality — that 
you recognize but cannot 
name. It's like a thoroughbred horse 
— its class shows in every line as 
well as in action. 

It is the "class" of the Soda Fountain market — and 
there is an affinity between classy merchants and the 
Becker-Iceless. 

Others may build fountains as good as Becker used to 
make — but never the equal of the down -to -date 
Becker-Iceless — because we are always from one to 
five seasons in advance of other makers. 

Just look at our 1911 model — all marble construction — 
with 50<f o more insulation than in others. 

Don't take our word for it — we "show you." 
Write or wire us- 

?A*BeckerCompa 

LARGEST INOEPENOENT SODA FOUNTAIN FACTORY 



— Now is the time— -1 
TO BUY A FOUNTAIN J 

You get at least 

3 MONTHS' 
SERVICE 

Practically FREE 



The wise buyers 

buy early—and get the 
highest class of workman- 
ship as well as avoiding 
delays in delivery 

Just sign and mail the 
coupon and our dem^y^ 
onstrator will call 
when in your/g^ r L A Becker 

Company, 

Chicago. 
Send your salesman 
with full sized working 
'/tS section of 1911 Model Becker- 
Iceless and easy terms propo- 
sition. No obligation on my part. 



THE. WORLD. 



2262 S.HALSTED ST. CHICAGO 




Name 



Address 



PACIFIC COAST REPRESENTATIVES 
STEWART HOLMES, 211 Third Ave. South, Seattle, Wash 



American Druggist 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



8 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Buyers' Guide. 



If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supplied. 

For Alphabetical Index See Page 45. 



ALCOHOL 

Webb, James A., & Sons, New York. 

ANTIPHLOGISTINE 

Denver Chemical Co., New York. 

ANTITOXIN 

Fritsche Bros., New York. 
Mulford & Co., H. K.. Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Pasteur Vaccine Co., Paris; Branch 
houses, New York and Chicago. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Schering & Glatz, New York. 

Stearns, Frederick, & Co., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Schleffelln & Co., New York. 

BEESWAX 

Leonard, Theo., Paterson, N. J. 

BOTTLE CAPS 
Wlrz, A. H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOXES 

tit. Washington Box Co., Boston, 
Mass. 

Bead, E. B., * Son, Baltimore, Md. 
Sbelp, Henry H., & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

BOXES, TIN 

American Can Co., New York. 
American Stopper Co., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

BRUSHES 

Imperial Brash Factory, New York. 
Hughes, Henry L., Chicago, 111. 

CANDIES, CHOCOLATE, ETC. 

Allegrettl Chocolate Cream Co., New 
York. 

Huyler Chocolate Co., New York. 
Runkel Bros., New York. 



CAPSULES 

Merz Capsule Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Planten, H., & Son, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Register Co., 



CASH REGISTER 
The National Cash 
Dayton, Ohio. 

CEMENT 

Major Mfg. Co.. New York. 
Russia Cement Co., Gloucester, Mass. 

CHEMICALS 

Albany Chemical Co.. Albany, N. Y. 
Elmer & Amend, New York. 
Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
Frltzsche Bros., New York. 
Malllnckrodt Chemical Works. St. 

Louis, Mo., and New York. 
Merck & Co.. New York. 
New York Quinine & Chemical Wks.. 

New York. 
Pasteur Vaccine Co., Chicago. 
Parke. Davis A Co.. Detroit. Mich. 
Powers A Welgbtman. Philadelphia. 

Pa. 

Schering & Glatx. New York. 
Sebleffelin A Co.. New York. 



CHEWING GUM 
Licorice 



Co., Brooklyn, 



National 
N. Y. 

New England Confectionery Co . 

Boston, Mass. 
Sen-Sen Chiclet Co.. New York. 

COLLAPSIBLE TUBES 

Wlrz. A. H.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

COLLEGES 

Albany College of Pharmacy. Albany, 
N. Y. 

Buffalo College of Pharmacy. 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 

Philadelphia. 
University of the State of New 

Jersey, Jersey City, N. J. 



CORKS 

Armstrong Cork Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Brauer, Justus, & Sons, Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

COURT PLASTER 
Carpenter Chemical Co.. Detroit, 
Mich. 

New-Skin Co.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

CRUDE DRUGS 
Allaire. Woodward & Co.. Peoria. 111. 

Hopkins & Co., J. L., New York. 

DRUGGIST COATS 
Welssfeld Brothers. New York. 

ELECTRIC SIGNS 
Art Sign Co.. Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ray. S. E.. Mfg. Co.. Danbury, Conn. 

ESSENTIAL OILS AND FLAVOR- 
ING EXTRACTS 
Allen Stafford & Song. London. E. C. 
Atbanasslades Sons, J. E., New 

York. 

Crown Cordial & Extract Co., New 
York. 

Fries Bros., New York. 
Frltzsche Bros.. New York. 
Fngerer & Co.. New York. 
Wolmark Chemical Co., New York. 

FIRE INSURANCE 
American Druggist Fire Ins., Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Druggist Indemnity Exchange. St. 

Louis. 

FIXTURES AND FURNITURE 
Revell. A. H.. & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Seger A Gross Co., New York. 

FOUNTAIN PENS 

Waterman Pen Co., New York. 
Royal Specialty Co., New York. 

GASTRIC JUICE 

Laboratories of Applied Physiology 
of France, New York. 



GLASSWARE AND SUNDRIES 
Elmer & Amend, New York. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 
Hygeia Nursing Bottle Co., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

GRAPE JUICE 
Welch Grape Juice Co., Westteld. 
N. Y. 

HARMONICAS 
Hobner, M.. New York. 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

INFANTS' FOOD 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co.. I<w 

York. 

Horllck's Malted Milk Co.. Racia*. 
Wis. 

Smith. Kline & French, Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Mellin's Food Co.. Boston. Mass. 
INKS 

Davids Co., Thaddeus, New York. 
LABELS 

Read, E. B., & Son. Baltimore. Md 
Mott Label Co., W. A.. Norwalk, 

Conn. 

MACHINERY. ETC. 
Colton, Arthur. Company, Detroit. 
Mich. 

Wlrz, A. H.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

MALTED MILK 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co.. law 

York. 

Horllck's Malted Milk Co.. Bacln*. 
Wis. 

MINERAL WATERS 
Garrod Spa Lithia Water Co.. it 

Louis. 

NEBULIZERS 
Becton-Dicklnson A Co., New York. 
PASTEURIZERS 

The Thermoton Co.. New York. 



SENPINE 



For ASTHMA, CATARRH 
HAY-FEVER 



ASTHMA 



CATARRH 



CURED 

Expert Medical Scientists Announce Startling Results 
Obtained by Senplne 

New York. — Thousands are taking advantage of the generous 
offer made by The Woodworth Co., Dept. O, 1161 Broadway, New 
York City, requesting an experimental package of Senpine, the great 
discovery for Asthma, Hay Fever, Bronchitis, and Catarrh, which 
is mailed free of charge to all who write for it. It is curing thou- 
sands of the most stubborn cases. It makes no difference how long 
you have been suffering or how severe the climatic conditions are 
where you live, Senpine will cure you. 

If you have experimented with other treatments and have failed 
to find a cure do not be discouraged, but send for a trial of this 
wonderful truly meritorious remedy which is a scientific compound dis- 
covered by a Professor of Vienna University, and is being recom- 
mended by thousands. 



THIS 
AD VER TISEMENT 
APPEARING / V EVE^Y 
DAIL Y NE WSPA PER 



HAVE YOU HAD A CALL FOR. IT? 

ORDER DIRECT OR THROUGH YOUR JOBBER 

$2 SIZE, $16 F»ER DOZEN 



THE WOODWORTH COMPANY 

1161-1175 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST rvhen writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



9 



Buyers' Guide.-c° ntinued - 

If you fail to find what you want in our advertising columns write us and information will be gladly supplied. 



PHARMACEUTICAL AND PRO- 
PRIETARY PREPARATIONS 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co., Chicago, 111. 
Allaire. Woodward & Co., Peoria, 111. 
Ammonol Chemical Co., New York. 
Anglo-American Drug Co., New York. 
Antikanmia Chem. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Bauer Chemical Co., New York. 
The Berlin Chemical Laboratories, 

New York. 
Breitenbach, M. J., Co., New York. 
Bristol-Myers Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Burroughs, Wellcome & Co., London. 
Centaur Co., New York. 
Chattanooga Med. Co., Chattanooga, 

Tcnn. 

The Cudahy Packing Co., South 

Omaha, Neb. 
Denver Chemical Co., New York. 
Doane, Chas. K., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Drevet Mfg. Co., New York. 
Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fairchild Bros. & Foster, New York. 
Fellows Medical Mfg. Co., Ltd., New 

York. 

Fries Bros., New York. 
Fritsche Bros., New York. 
Hoffman, Geo. W., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hoffman-La Roche Chemical Works, 

New York. 
Lambert Pharm. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
McAvoy Brewing Co., Chicago, 111. 
Merck & Co. 

Mulford Co.. H. K., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Munyon's Homoeopathic Home Rem' 

edy Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Oakland Chemical Co., New York. 



Pabst Extract Co., Milwaukee, Wli. 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Personenl, J., New York. 

Pinex Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Planten, H., & Sons, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schieffelln & Co.. New York. 

Scott & Bowne, Bloomfleld, N. J. 

Sharp & Dohme. New York. 

Smith. J. P., New York. 

Smith. Kline & French Co., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Smith, Martin H., Co., New York. 

Swanson's Rheumatic Cure Co.. Chi- 
cago. 111. 

Sylvester's Haarlem Oil. New York. 
Wampole & Co.. Henry K. . Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Wells, Richardson Co., Burlington, 

Vt. 

Woodworth Co., The, New York. 
Wyeth, Jno., & Bro.. Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

Young, W. F.. Springfield. Mass. 

PINEAPPLE JUICE 
Dole's Pure Hawaiian, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

PLAYING CARDS 

American Bank Note Co., New York. 
Dougherty, A., New York. 

POSTAL CARDS (SOUVENIR) 
Albertype Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
American News Co.. New York. 
Bouton & Co., Inc., J., New York. 
Kropp. E. C. Co.. Milwaukee. Win. 
National Color Type Co., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

RAZORS 

Simmons Hardware Co., St. Louis, 

Mo. 

Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 



RUBBER GOODS 
Davol Rubber Co. Providence. R. I. 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

SCALES 

Torsion Balance Co., New York. 

SHOW CASES 

Detroit Show Case Co.. Detroit, Mich. 
Revell, A. H., & Co., Chicago. 111. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 

Becker Co., L. A., Chicago, 111. 
Green & Sons. Robt. M., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Liquid Carbonic Co., Chicago. 
Loeber Co.. Henry G., New York. 

SODA FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES 

American Chem. Co. 

Doering & Son Co., Chicago. 111. 

Hawaiian Pineapple Products Co., 
Ltd., San Francisco, Cal. 

Mosteller Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

Smith, J. Hungerford. Co.. Roches- 
ter. N. Y. 

Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

SPICE MILLS 
Allaire. Woodward & Co., Peoria. 111. 

STATIONERY, ETC. 
American News Co., New York. 

STERILIZERS 
Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 

STOPPERS. SPRINKLER TOPS. 
ETC. 

Whitall Tatum Co.. New York. 
Wlrz. A. H.» Philadelphia. Pa. 



SUPPOSITORIES 
Schieffelln & Co.. New York. 

SYRINGES 

The Marvel Co., New York. 
Wbltall Tatum Co.. New York. 

SYRINGE BOXES 

Sheip. Henry. Sc Co., Philadelphia. Pa. 

THERMOMETERS 

Becton, Dickinson Co., New York. 
Kessling. E.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Whitall Tatum Co., New York. 

TOILET SPECIALTIES 

Graham, Mrs. Gervalse, Chicago, III. 
Hall & Ruckel. New York. 
Hudson & Co.. New York. 
Hydrox Chemical Co., New York. 
Ingram Co., F. F.. Detroit, Mich. 
Kress & Owen Co., New York. 
Lambert Phar. Co.. St. Louis. Mo. 
Loreley-Duplex Mfg. Co., New York. 
Reslnol Co.. Baltimore, Md. 

VACCINES 

Pasteur Yacclne Co.. Paris; branch**. 
New York and Chicago. 

VACCINE VIRUS 

Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Pasteur Vaccine Co., Paris; branches 

New York and Ch'cago. 
Stearns, Frederick. * Co.. Detroit. 

Mich. 

Mulford, H. K.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



DRUGGISTS 

are often asked for an antiseptic 
MOUTH WASH that they can guar- 
antee is FREE FROM ACID. Such 
a preparation is 

LYTHOL 

Serial No. 2508 
Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30th, 



1906 



It preserves the teeth by preventing 
decay. Allays inflammation and ca- 
tarrhal conditions of the mucous 
membranes of the Eye, Nose, Mouth 
and Throat. Relieves Sore Throat 
and Hoarseness. 



CARPINE 
NAPTHO-SULPHUR CREAM 

is now being advertised extensively 
and persistently to the medical profes- 
sion as a local application in all forms 
of skin affections. 

Druggists should see that a suffi- 
cient quantity is kept in stock, in order 
to meet the demand that must accrue 
from this constant advertising. 

Being composed of beta-napthoi 
and sulphur — two of the most power- 
ful parasiticides — you can recommend 
it with enthusiasm in all diseases of 
both scalp and skin. 

Car pine Naptho-Sulphur Cream 
can be secured through the jobbing 
trade, generally 



FOR SALE BY ALL JOBBERS 

...OR. ... 

HUDSON & COMPANY, Inc., Mannfactariug Chemists, 149-151 West 36th Street, NEW YORK 

Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



Ill 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



We Lead; Others Try to Follow! 




All our outfits are READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY and are shipped complete, as shown In Illustration 

SEGER & GROSS CO., 42 to 60 west 67th St., new york 

TELEPHONE 1041 COLUMBUS Originators and Makers of High Grade Druggists Fixtures at a price within the reach of all 




CARPENTER'S Water-Proof Liquid Th r n ?3" 
COURT PLASTER 

Dealers please note Our Free Goods Offer , viz : 1 Dozen Free 
with each 6 dozen (on the 10c size only) stands as 
heretofore until further notice. 



ANTISEPTIC 
PREVENTS BLOOD 
POISONING 



CARPENTER'S 

WILL NOT 
WASH OFF 



PROTECTS AND HEALS 
CUTS. BURNS. 
ABRASIONS. ETC. 



10c, 25c and 50c sizes. Put up in convenient Collapsible Tubes. 
CARPENTER CHEMICAL COMPANY, 

48-54 STATE STREET, - - DETROIT, MICH 



Lion's 

We Give You the $W$k OF" THE PROFIT 




Share 

We want all dealers in post cards to investigate our line, which consists of the largest line post cards of every description, comprising in 
general, Birthday and Greetings, Valentines, St. Patrick, Easter, Season Cards and Fancy Cards. Prices always the lowest 

SAMPLE LINE " A "—Consisting ol Birthdays, 'Greetings SAMPLE LINE "B" Consisting ot Valentine. Easter. Wash* 
and Comic cards, to retail at lc- 2 lor 5c. and 5c sellers. Ington. and St. Patrick cards, lor the year 1911. to retail 
1000 cards lor $6.75. Express prepaid. at lc. 2 lor Sc. and Sc. each. 1000 cards S3. 23. Enrtti irtiili. 

REMEMBER: 'THE LION'S SHARE OF THE PROFIT FOR YOU 

•J. BOLJTOIV & CO., Inc., MfMSrNcw York 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



Are You Blindfolded? 



If you disregard what advertisers are 
doing to help you increase your sales, you 
ignore the force that is driving business — 
advertising. 

Unless you know which man- 
ufacturers advertise and what 
they advertise you are running 
a race blindfolded — in com- 
petition with merchants with 
both eyes clear. 

The far-seeing retail merchant today does this : 
He studies magazine advertising and then picks 
what he thinks will be the best sellers to his 
customers he would like to get. 

See for yourself what one retailer in San Francisco, Cal., says about goods 
advertised in Good Housekeeping Magazine. 

" What I write is from my own personal knowledge. From a small store less than four 
years ago, by handling such goods as are advertised in this sheet (four-page advertisement 
tike this) we built up a business of over a third of a million dollars sales in 1909, and when 
January, 1911, comes we hope to have done much better." (Name sent on request.) 

Good Housekeeping Magazine is the logical place for you to keep in touch 
with articles bought on the good judgment of wives and mothers. To look 
over its advertising section will give you second sight in regard to what an 
intelligent housekeeper will buy from a progressive storekeeper. 

Use this idea. Make more money and make it more easily. 
Sign and send for sample copies now, lest you put down 
this publication and forget it. 



To Advertising Department Good Housekeeping Magazine, Springfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen : Please send me sample copies of your magazine to my home address. 



Name Home Jfddress 




~1 



EDIT ORIAL 

SECTION 
IDEAS NEEDED 
WIVESt MOTHERS 



G OOD HO USEKEEPING INSTITUTE 

LISTOF ARTICLES 

TESTED eneappROVEO 

DURING MONTH 



1 



ADVERTISING 
SECTION 

{MERCHANDISE NEEDED 
BY WIVES 6 MOTHERS 
AND SOLO 

BY DEALERS 



customers and will draw 



Firm Name 



Firm Jfddress 



A. D. 



MAKE YOUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 





a POMPEiAN I 



Have Ail Your Gowns of Stylish Colors 



I Diamond Dyes 








The Clear Track" 



r Boll lyacn bu snwi 



shion's ^(1* 




Pears 
Soap $ 




\Orchic/s are Rare 

— not so 

w/tere women 
so daj/y 




HINDS 

VHoney and Almond 

CREAM 



PERFECT 

Bathing 

} From lb* .jv! 




f. of R«n 

K*iwe until nov 
through ail ui* fit 
<r« »c th* art jrf be- 

clean. therr orffr 
has been *och tatting, su-.h lmtuij of deb 
linear, such rxbilaratioa Is amy parr ft* 



C HAND 
OAPOLIO 

BIST FOR TOUT BEST Ft* BATH 



Some 
Recent Full-page 
Advertisements 

Manufacturers advertise in Good Housekeeping 
Magazine because there are over 300,000 women, 
heads of real homes, who buy the things needed 
for themselves and their families through the guid- 
ance of its advertising pages. 

Progressive dealers study the advertising section to 
learn in advance what their best customers are 
being told to buy. Do you? 

Other advertisers are : 



Caementiuni Sales Co. 
Daggett & Ramsdell (Cold Cream) 
Hawaii ELD Tineapple Products Co. (Dole's Pineapple 
Juice) 

Andrew Jergens Co. (Woodbury's Facial Soap) 
Gerhard Mennen Co. (Mennen's Skin Soap. ele. ) 
Mellin's Feod Co. 

Mnblena & Kreptr (White Rose Glycerine snap) 
Potter Drug & Chemical Corp. (Culicura Soap) 
Ed. Pinatd (Toilet Preparations) 
V. S. Specialty Co. (Alteon Manicure Set) 
Walpole Rubber Co. (Hot Water Bottles) 



Read Good Housekeeping for Buying Ideas 



FOR WELL- ADVERTISED GOODS 







Bams CHOCOLATE 

Blue Wrapper^ Yetlow label 

Trade-Mark on the Back. 

^Me/trj/ choice of 
a// grood />ot/.s<> - 
Aeeper.s /or cooX- 
it?paJ7c) e)ririfir//(/ 

ESTABLISHED I7BO 

Walfeb Baker&coip 

DORCHESTER, MASS. 





From 
Good Housekeeping 
Magazine 

You find here only a part of the goods advertised 
in Good Housekeeping Magazine and sold by 
merchants in your line of trade. From month to 
month you will find many other articles advertised 
in season. 

You can draw trade to your own store in double 
measure if you take advantage of this advertising help 
which manufacturers gladly put at your service. 

Other advertisers are : 



The Welch Grape Juice Co. 
Coca-Cola Co. 

Electro-Silicon Co. (Silver Polish) 

J. Hubbard & Co. (Vegetable Germicide) 

Oakland riiemical Co. (Dioxogen) 

Dr. J. Parker Pray (Toilet Specialties) 

Phila. Bird Food Co. (Bird Manna) 

Russia Cement Co. (Le Page's Liquid Glue) 

Smith. Kline & French (Eskay's Food) 

U. S. Playing Card Co. (Congress Playing Cards) 

Vapo-Cresolene Co. 




VASELINE 

Tie Pu«*»t Pcirfmm Jelly 



If- 1 

W vi 





Good Teeth— Good Health- Good Nature 

ICOLGATEl'Sl 

RIBBON DENTAL CREftM 




tin 





r Canthrox Shampoo S 



Current Copies Free 



— Coupon 



on Page 1 



Good Housekeeping Magazine 
Helps Merchants 

And if you read it you double the help 

Good Housekeeping Magazine will send you customers 
whether you read it or not. But if you do read it you 
will have new vision and nezv light Because you zvill find 
it good business to get your buying ideas f rom the same 
place that your best customers get theirs. 

That place is the advertising section of Good House- 
keeping Magazine. The reason is this : Women who 
are good managers read Good Housekeeping Magazine 
to get practical suggestions and they read the adver- 
tising section to get the things needed to put those 
suggestions into use. They buy the advertised goods, 
knowing that our guarantee insures, not only full value, 
but satisfactory service. 

And remember Good Housekeeping Institute, the 
experimental laboratory for testing all sorts of house- 
hold devices. A list of Tested and Approved articles 
is published each month — valuable facts for dealers 
to know. 

Just as merchants take trade journals, women take 
Good Housekeeping Magazine. They read it and 
study it as the trade paper of the home. 

You can have copies of this magazine for housekeepers 
and storekeepers by simply filling out the coupon on page 
one. Do it now! 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



15 



Get a R.eceipt 

PROGRESSIVE DRUGGISTS 

Learn about " Get a Receipt." It is the most valuable plan yet 
devised to safeguard your cash and credit sales — in fact, all the 
transactions that take place in your store 

It Protects Your Business By 

1. Stopping mistakes and losses. 

2. Insuring you that the proper amount of the sale is registered. 

3. Enforcing a correct record of charge sales. 

4. Compelling proper credit to be given for all money received on 

account. 

5. Enforcing a proper record of all money paid out. 

6. Satisfying Customers. 




The Register 

This register issues receipts and tells you 
the five most important things about 
your business : 

1. Total cash sales 
made by each clerk. 

2. Total of your 
charge sales. 

3. Total amount of 
money received on ac 
count. 

4. Total amount of 
money paid out. 

5. Total amount of 
cash taken in. A secret 
adding counter tells you 
this. 

Has a separate cash drawer for each 
clerk, from one to nine, which is the 
same as having an individual cash reg- 
ister for every clerk. 



162 JAN. 30 

★B-1.75 

E. L. MARSH 

1 50 First Ave. 

Jackson, Miss. 

This is your receipt for 
the correct amount of your 
purchase. See that you get 
it 

(over) 



The Receipt 

Indicates to the customer the 
amount of cash paid for goods, 
the amount of cash received on 
account or the amount of goods 
charged. It tells the proprietor 
the amount of cash paid out. It 
tells which clerk made the transac- 
tion. You can have any advertis- 
ing you want on the check. 



Ask the National Cash Register Sales Agent in your city about this "Get a Receipt" plan, or address: 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COMPANY 

DAYTON, OHIO 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



i6 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Be able to Fill Orders for 

PIN EX 

the Big Selling Cough Remedy 

This remedy was designed by a pharmaceutical 
chemist to take the place of a thousand and one 
home-made remedies used by housewives to cure 
coughs. 

People that used to come to the druggist for five 
cents' worth of glycerine and a nickel's worth of 
Horehound tea, licorice, or something else, are now 
buying 50 cents' worth of Pinex. 

They get a better remedy and they pay the drug- 
gist a better profit. 

Pinex has created a lot of brand new, profitable 
cough medicine sales to a class of people who 
would not buy an ordinary cough syrup. 

If you're not selling it you should. We guaran- 
tee the sale. Unsold bottles returnable at any 
time. 

Any jobber will supply you. $4 per dozen. Re- 
tails at 50c the bottle. 

The Pinex Co. Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



MR. DRUGGIST! WHY NOT PUSH THAT 
GOOD PREPARATION OF YOURS ? 

Our Experts write bright, readable copy for Books, 
Leaflets and Folders that sell the goods. 

Just send a copy of label and particulars, and get a 
quotation. 

WE KNOW HOW ! 

SCRIPTOR, 2203 Oretn Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 




"Every Coat We turn out a Winner" 

Druggists and Dispensers Coals 

qr Your personal appearance will be improved by 
wearing our made to measure coats, thoroughly 
shrunk. We have a large variety of styles and 
strictly washable materials. Cut shows style No. 5 
made from any material desired. 
fT Write for our swatch card showing styles, ma- 
terials, and prices, free upon request. We can fit 
you properly by mail, free delivery to all parts 
of the world. 

WEISSFELD BROTHERS 
1 17 Nassau Street :: :: :: NEW YORK 





SELL A BOTTLE OF 

ABSORBINE FOR $2.00 

*nd make 50c profit rather than sell the cheaper 
article with its 6 or yc profit. It requires no 
more time, paper or twine, but it does greatly 
increase your volume of business and annual 
profits. And in addition you have a satisfied 
customer who will buy ABSORBINE and other 
things from you year after year. 

ABSORBINE is constantly advertised in the 
prominent farm, stock and horse papers, and 
horse-owners everywhere are demanding AB- 
SORBINE. Are you getting your share of this 
business? Inquiries received at this office are 
referred to nearest druggist carrying the remedy 
in stock. Have ~ou reported? 

ABSORBINE is a mild, antiseptic, resolvent 
and discutient liniment for removing Bursal 
Enlargements, Bog Spavins, Thoroughpins. 
Puffs, Shoe Boils, Capped Hocks; healing cuts 
and bruises; curing strains, or sprains; stops 
lameness and allays pain. Does not blister or 
remove the hair and horse can be used. 

ABSORBINE JR. is ABSORBINE prepared 
for mankind and is a trustworthy household 
liniment. It has met with great success in re- 
ducing VARICOSE VEINS, VARICOCELE, 
GOITRE, ENLARGED GLANDS; healing ul- 
cers, wounds, sores; takes out soreness and in- 
flammation, allays pain. Put up in two sizes 
retailing at $:.oo 4-oz. bottle and $2.00 ia-oz. 
•ottle. 

Imprinted pamphlets if you want them. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F. 

49 Temple Street Springfield, Mass. 



is the one and only absolutely uniform 
and unalterable solution of iron and 
manganese in the form of true organic 
peptonates. It is also the one and 
only preparation lawfully entitled to 
be known as "Pepto-Mangan," a valid 
trademark, which is our exclusive 
property. We respectfully request the 
trade to take due notice of these facts. 

M. J. Breitenbach Co., New yofk,u.s.a. 



" THAT'S WHAT THEY ALL SAY" 

Perfumes made from Wolmark Concrete Flower Oils last longer, and 
cost half. Try them. 

Make a good perfume, and save 100 per cent. 
Make a good Customer by selling a better Perfume. 
Let it be something new for your trade. 
Let it be your exclusive make. 

Our odors suit the most delicate taste. Write for our new price list 
and Formula; book. Select your odors. We recommend the following: 
Violet de Parme....@ $2.25 per oz. Corylupsis du Japan® 2.0a per oz. 

Dear Kiss Fleurie..@ 2.25 per oz. Honey Suckle @ $1.75 per oz. 

Lilac Swiss @ 1.25 per oz. 

And one hundred and two other Oils listed. Soon you will use Otto 
of Rose Synthetic W. C. C. The sooner the better. This Otto it 
stronger than the Natural. To give finish to your toilet Preparationa, 
use "WOLMARK'S SYNTHETICS." 

WOLMARK CHEMICAL CO. Formerly Flora Chemical Co. 
113 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



Madam Dean's Antiseptic 
Vaginal Suppositories 

A PERFECTLY RELIABLE VAGINAL ANTISEPTIC 
Price *3.S0 per dozen t Retails at 50c. per Box 

Sold by all Jobbors or order direct from 
„ - THE UNITED MEDICAL CO., Inc. 
P.O.Box Ne. 74-. Send for Free Sam pies. LANCASTER, PA. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST xvhen writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



17 



Hotel Lenox 



BUFFALO. N. Y. 




* J|, , * ; 

HIGHEST GRADE FIREPROOF 
Ideal hotel (or visitors to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Points on the 
Great Lakes and Canadian Resorts. 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

$1.50 per day and up 
ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT PRICES 

Patrons may take Taxicabs or Carriages from Depots or 
Wharves direct to hotel, charging same to The Lenox 

When in Buffalo stop at THE LENOX. The accommodations 
and service are sure to please. 

C. A. MINER, Manager 



METABOLINUM 



A Tonic ol Superior Excellence lor Disorders ol the 
Nerves and Similar Organic Disturbances 

Acting directly and beneficially on the metabolism of the 
sufferer. Its good results are permanent, for it is abso- 
lutely free from any ingredients having a harmful or evan- 
escent effect. 

METABOLINUM 

is composed solely of curative drugs and contains no al- 
cohol, morphine, codeine, strychnine, opium, mercury or 
other narcotics. 

Every druggist realizes the value of a satisfied customer. 
We will back up with our guarantee your recommendation 
for its satisfactory qualities. A list of your customers 
will be treated confidentially. Send a list to us, and we 
will mail to each customer a booklet in sealed envelope, 
stating that "Metabolinum" is to be procured from you. 



$24.00 per dozen, large size, (quarts) 
$12.00 " *' small *' (pints) 
Discounts on application Retail price S2.50 and SI, 25 respectively 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 

The Berlin Chemical Laboratories 

558-560 West 171st Street, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



YEARS OF THE 

WILES PLAN 

Has made the Retail Druggists Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars in Profits 

DID YOU GET YOUR SHARE? 

Price Protection 

Is after all the only live issue — the one that gives point to the druggists' motto: 

"Live and Let Live" 




The co-operation of the Druggist is especially due to those who help him 
THE DR. MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart, Ind. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



W. ICO. VASELINE ATOMIZERS 

hr Melting and Spraying Vaseline and Similar Ointments, and Atomizing Medicinal Oils. 
Of Superior Material and the Best Workmanship and Finish. 

r\ The glass bottles in all our Vaseline Atomizers are specially annealed to stand 

# \ changes in temperature, so that medicated vaseline or heavy oil can be melted in them, 
+ l>h either over a flame or in hot water, and applied to the nose and throat in a fine volumin- 
ous spray. 

jL^ ^ JJ The bulbs are of best quality rubber, elastic and durable. The valve is seated in a 
neck, and cannot work loose. 

All metal parts are substantially nickel-plated. The curved liquid tube will take up the contents of the bottle almost 

to the last drop. 

Each In box. 1/4 dozen In package. 

With Detachable Throat and Nasal Tubes of Metal. 
No. 30 $10.00 Per dozen 

DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE 40% IN PACKAGE LOTS 40.10% 

For full line of ATOMIZERS see pages 104 to 111 Inclusive of our 1911 catalogue 

WHITALL TATUM COMPANY 




BOSTON 
91 Washington St., North 



NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 
46 and 48 Barclay St. 410-416 Race St. 

A full line of samples of our goods can be seen at our sample rooms, Nos. 120-122 Franklin St., Chicago 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
576 Mission St. 



SYDNEY, N. S. W. 
10 Barrack St. 



E 
D 
I 

C 
I 

N 
A 
L 



FOUNDED 1818 



P0WERS-WE1CHTMAN-R0SENCARTEN CO. 

manufacturing Chemists 




NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



sr. louis 



MORPHINE SULPHATE, Flakes or Cubes. 

QUININE SULPHATE and other Salts. 

BISMUTH SUBNITRATE, Bulky, Tasteless. 
POTASSIUM IODIDE, Crystals or Granular. 

CODEINE. POTASSIUM ACETATE, Granular. 

CALOMEL. AMMONIUM CARBONATE, Cubes. 

ETHER, U. S. F». 

Especially prepared for Anaesthesia and meeting the exacting require- 
ments of Surgical operations. A lull line of Medicinal Chemicals. 



SPECIFY F* - W - R ON YOUR ORDERS 



T 
E 
G 
H 
N 
I 

C 
A 
L 



che nvr 1 o 



""THE advertiser who 
gets his offering 
into the right kind of 
stores secures results. 
That is the reason old 
advertisers stay in the 
American Druggist 
and new ones constantly 
use our columns: they 
have found that the 
American Druggist 
goes into the stores 
of buyers. 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



19 





ureHawaiian 



A Wonderful, New, Healthful All-the-Year- 
Round Drink. Physicians prescribe it in throat, 
stomach and intestinal troubles. A reh<rshing drink 
during fever convalescence. Druggists, Grocers and 
Soda Fountains supplied by any wholesale Drug- 
gist or Grocer. If you can't get Dole's write us. 
Booklet for the asking. 

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE PRODUCTS CO., Ltd. 
112 Market Street San Francisco. Cat 



THE ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY— UNION UNIVERSITY. 

Organized In 1881. 

Graded course of instruction, comprising two terms of seven months each. Fees: $80.00 per term. Write for our catalogue 
giving full information. Address 

THEODORE J. BRADLEY, Ph. G. ( Secretary, Albany, N. Y. 



Allen's Croton Oil 



THE BEST IS 
THE BEST FOR YOU! 

is the Best, and Keeps Indefinitely, because it is expressed Cold. 

You Know that — PURITY+COLOR+ STABLE QUAL1TY=THERAPEUTIC 
VALUE in Croton Oil — Allen's possesses those qualities in the Highest Degree — 
that's why it's the Standard in England, where the requirements are most strict. 

Allen's Croton Oil is Well Advertised and in Constant Demand 



Chicago, 22 Filth Ave. 

Philadelphia, 514 Arch St. 

San Francisco, 244 California St, 



Be sure to SPECIFY ALIEN'S. Prepared only by 

STAFFORD ALLEN & SONS, Ltd. 



Est. 1833. 



LONDON, ENGLAND 



NEW YORK 
LINGERER & COMPANY 
273 PEARL STREET 



® 

^■^^ THE WORLD 

ARMSTRONG OOR. 



The STANDARD 
PRESCRIPTION 
-CORKS- 



.OF. 




POPULAR FOR GENERATIONS 



PLANTEN'S -TRADEMARK, _ 

C&Cor Black 

^ & CAPSULES 



(Registered in United States Patent OthceJ 

ONE of the: oldest remedies for 

Gonorrhoea, Gleet, etc., etc. 

" CAPSULES OF QU ALITY " 



PLANTEN'S 



CAPSULES 



Let us send you samples 

H. PLANTEN & SON 

Founded 1836 Brooklyn, M . Y. 




-PHARMACY-STUDENTS- 
-PURCHASE-THE-BEST- 

/Answers to Questions 
1 prescribed by Phar- 
m a c e u t i c a I State 
/Boards. 8vo. 303 pp. 
VPrice $1.50 net. 

JOHN JOS. McVEY 
Publisher Philadelphia, Pa. 



GASTROGEN 
TABLETS 

4 Neutralizing Digestive 
$4.00 per dozen 

Througk Jobbers. 

BRISTOL-MYERS CO. 
277-281 Greene Ave. 
Brooklyn-New York.U.S.A. 




A Neutrauzing Digestive 

INDICATED IN VARIOUS" 
FORMS OF 
INDIGESTION 



BRISTOL-MYERS 0? 




Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST zvhen writing to Advertisers. 



20 AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



INSULATION counts most in an 

ICE CREAM CABINET 

ARCTIC STEEL ICE CREAM CABINETS 

arc insulated with 2- PURE CORK. 
Entirely constructed of IMon-Rustable Steel. 
Use less ice than any other cabinet. Do 
not leak, swell or waterlog. All sizes. 

A catalogue for the asking. 

C. DOERING & SON 

LAKE and SHELDON STS. CHICAGO, ILL. 



PHILADELPHIA 
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

The oldest, largest and best College ol Phar- 
macy In tbe United States. 

Tne College that educated DIehl, Ebert, Cob- 
lentz, Halberg. Eberle. Ryan and others equally 
prominent, and numbers among Its present 
faculty. Remington. Sadtler. Kraemer. Moerk. 
La Wall, well known authors and teachers. 



United States Dispensatory 

19th Edition 

Based on the Eighth Decennial Revision of the United States Pharmacopoeia 

EDITED BY 

HORATIO C. WOOD, JOSEPH P. REMINGTON, SAMUEL P. SADTLER. 

M.D.. LL.D. PH.M.. F.C.S.. FX.S. PH.D., F.C.S. 

Assisted by A. B. LYONS, M.D., and H. C. WOOD, Jr., M.D. 



"A wonderful repository of information concerning drugs and chemloals. 
* * * The druggist who has the book at hand for reference need never be at a 
loss when confronted with any of the constantly recurring problems at the dis- 
pensing counter."— AMERICAN DRUGGIST, June 10, 1907. 



2,008 pages. Illustrated. Imperial 8vo. Cloth, $7.00; Sheep, $8.00. Hall Russia, $0.00 

With patent Index, 50c additional 



ORDER FROM 

AMERICAN DRUGGIST PUBLISHING COMPANY 

66 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

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and PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD 

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Entered at New York as Second Class Matter. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Editorial Comment: 

The Syllabus and the Questions, Danger in the Teaspoon, The 
Legislative Outlook 63 

Net Weight Measures, Opposition to the Foster Bill, The Con- 
sumption of Opium, What Is the Legitimate Consumption? 64 

Give Us a Rest. Dispensing by Doctors in England, The Pan 
American Conference. Extracts of the Thyreoid Gland 65 

The Standardization of Drugs 66 



Original Communications: 

Acacia and Its Uses in Pharmacy, by J. Leon Lascoff, Ph.G.; 
Christmas in Cuba, by Prof. Joseph P. Remington; A List of 
Anaesthetics, by Prof. Charles Baskerville; An Apparatus for 
Keeping Lime Water, by Otto Raubenheimer, Ph.G 67-74 

Notes, Queries and Answers: 

Guaranty Registration Under the Pure Food and Drug Act, 
Guaranty Registration Food and Drugs Act, Baking Powder, The 
Removal of Chrysarobin Stains — A Correction, Unguentum 
Crede, Tablet Making and Machinery. Methods of Mirroring 



Glass, Golden Needles for Surgical Use 75-76 

Letters to the Editor: 

Who's to Blame, Raubenheimer Does Not Like Our New Method 
of Indexing and Says So 76 

Advertising, Business Accounting: 



Building Up a Candy Business, by Bernard Foote; Attracting the 
Crowd, A Few Schemes that Have Successfully Attracted the 



Attention of the Passerby to the Retail Store, by E. W. Spony; 
Some Worth While Ads. bv Frank Farrington; Bob Bawger 
Outdone 77-81 

Pharmacy Board Questions: 

New York State Board Examination 82 

News of the Drug World 83 96 

Review of the Wholesale Drug and Chemical Market 97-98 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

A perusal of the examination ques- 
Thc Syllabus and tion s set at the first meeting of the 
the Questions newly constituted hoard of phar- 



macy of the state of New York, 
which are printed elsewhere in this issue, is likely to prove con- 
fusing to those who have made a study of the pharmaceutical 
syllabus promulgated by the state authorities and already 

Index 



adopted by several other state boards. They should serve to 
allay in a measure the apprehensions of those who had feared 
that the standard of pharmaceutical education in New York 
was to be set too high. Certainly no graduate of a reputable 
college of pharmacy should have any difficulty in passing suc- 
cessfully the examination for registered pharmacists in the state 
of New York, if we are to judge by this set of questions, and 
no man who has served three years in a drug store under the 
tuition of a registered pharmacist need fear the examination 
if the questions for the grade of licensed druggist is to be the 
standard for future examinations. Some of the questions are 
of a most elementary character, but they may prove sufficient 
to determine the fitness of the licensed druggist to carry on the 
operations to which he is limited in this state. 



It is highly desirable that some concerted 
Danger in the action should be taken by doctors and 
Teaspoon druggists to do away with the domestic 

teaspoon as a medicine measure. Com- 
monly understood to represent a utensil capable of holding sixty 
minims or one fluid drachm, the capacity of teaspoons varies to 
an extraordinary extent. The subject is one that has been dis- 
cussed more than once in the drug press, but little has been ac- 
complished in the direction of influencing physicians to insist 
upon their patients using a graduated measure, or dose glass, in 
taking the prescribed amount of medicine. Attention has been 
directed to the subject anew in a paper read before the Brook- 
lyn Pharmaceutical Association by J. Leon Lascoff, which is 
printed on another page. The variations in ihe capacity of tea- 
spoons were impressed on him after having dispensed a prescrip- 
tion containing one-quarter of a grain of morphine in each 
drachm of the mixture. After the patient had taken a few 
doses he called up the dispenser on the telephone to tell him of 
the uncomfortable symptoms that had developed, saying that he 
felt himself going under the influence of a sleeping draught. 
Mr. Lascoff suspected the teaspoon and asked to see it. Upon 
its being produced and measured it was found to hold 110 
minims, so that the patient had taken nearly double the dose of 
morphine prescribed. The necessity is obvious of physicians in- 
sisting on the use of accurately marked medicine glasses or glass 
graduates marked in minims for the measuring of doses by their 
patients. 



The patent medicine almanacs which 
The Legislative served the purpose of a meteorological 
Outlook bureau for the farmer half a century 

ago, from time to time printed the 
warning : "About this time look out for storms." The retail 
druggist, bending under his burden of high rents, increased cost 
of living, higher rate of clerk hire and increased severity of 
•age 63. 



24 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



legal restrictions, who reads that the state legislature has con- 
vened, also reads between the lines the warning "about this time 
look out for storms." In Ohio one of the anti-narcotic bills pro- 
posed has been defeated in the legislature because the legislators 
feared that the board of pharmacy might grow rich on the fines 
imposed. This was but one of several measures introduced by 
the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. In the legislature of the state 
of New York a number of bills have been introduced and still 
others are threatened, all of which will still further hedge about 
the practice of pharmacy with restrictions. A local association 
of physicians thinks it would be a good idea to forbid the re- 
filling of any prescriptions, and so it might be — for the pre- 
scribes A certain group of pharmacists, on the other hand, 
desire to restrict the dispensing of medicine by physicians, while 
still others wish to safeguard the public by requiring the physi- 
cian to state on his prescription whether or not the medicine is 
intended for an adult, a child, or an infant. 



Nor is the Congress of the United States at 
Net Weight all backward in contributing its quota to the 
Measures volume of legislation affecting the retail 

druggist. The Foster bill, which places every 
retail druggist under the authority of the Bureau of Internal 
Revenue, has been dealt with at some length in these columns 
and is referred to elsewhere. We have, in addition, a healthy 
crop of bills which propose to govern the sale of packages of 
all sorts and to require that all foods and drugs put up for sale 
in package form must bear, on the outside of the package, a 
plain and conspicuous statement of the weight, measure or 
numerical count. This, of course, does not affect the majority 
of the retail drug tra'de directly, as it applies only to interstate 
commerce, but it does affect a considerable number of the drug- 
gists who are ordinarily considered retail dealers. The hear- 
ing given on this subject at Washington elicited the fact that 
considerable difference of opinion exists among the manufactur- 
ers as to the desirability of such enactment. It is even pro- 
posed to compel glassblowers to indicate in the glass itself the 
contents of the bottles. Some of the bills require the printing 
of the name of the manufacturer on each package, a require- 
ment which is strenuously objected to by some of the manufac- 
turers in the grocery trade and by many of the jobbers in that 
field who have posed as manufacturers. In view of tjie num- 
ber and diversity of the bills which have been introduced along 
this line, it does not seem probable that any will be enacted at 
the current session of Congress. 



Since the American Druggist 
Opposition to the pointed out the unnecessary hard- 
Foster Bili ships imposed on the retail drug 

trade by the Foster anti-narcotic 
measure there has been a gradual awakening on the part of the 
druggists throughout the United States to the fact that if this 
bill is enacted they will not only be subjected to annual fees, 
probably amounting to from $10 to $20, but will also be called 
upon to keep a system of detailed records as complicated as the 
financial statement of a trunk line railroad and as troublesome 
as a set of double entry books. The retail druggist is in earnest 
in his desire to do away with the illegitimate sale of narcotic 

/ n iex 



drugs, but since he is carrying on his business on a very narrow 
margin, since the item of help is a very important one in the 
expense account, and since his expenses are so large in pro- 
portion to his sales, any measure which adds materially to the 
cost of conducting his business by increasing the amount of 
work required will, in many cases, seriously cripple his net in- 
come, and, in some cases, will turn the scale so that there will 
be a deficit instead of a balance. In view of these facts, it is not 
a matter of surprise that the retail druggist should ask that 
some method of regulating the interstate commerce in narcotic 
drugs be devised which will not throw the burden of the pro- 
tection of the public on an innocent party, the retail druggist. 



In his report of the work of the 
The Consumption Opium Commission, Dr. Hamilton 
of Opium Wright states that the United 

States consumes approximately ten 
times as much opium per capita as do any of the central Euro- 
pean countries, in which the sale of opium is under severe legal 
restrictions. From this he concludes that since we use ten 
times as much opium as do these countries, nine-tenths of what 
we use is used for illegitimate purposes. The New York Med- 
ical Journal, in its issue for February 17, points out that, grant- 
ing the accuracy of the figures given by Dr. Wright as to con- 
sumption of opium in the different countries, it does not fol- 
low that because the American consumes ten times more opium 
than the European, he is consuming ten times as much as he 
should. The Journal takes the ground that the services of 
physicians and the use of medicine is affected by the spending 
power of the individual as much as is the consumption of what 
might be termed semi-necessities, such as tea, sugar and. meat. 
It is pointed out that "statistics show that the per capita con- 
sumption of tea in the United States is, or was (the figures are 
not recent), twenty-two times that in France; the per capita 
consumption of sugar in the United States over ten times that 
in Italy; and the per capita consumption of meat in the United 
States six times that in Italy. According to Dr. Wright's 
method of argument it would follow that because we use more 
tea than France and more sugar and more meat than Italy we 
are using excessive quantities of these articles." 



As a matter of fact, the 
What Is the Legitimate American lives on a much 
Consumption? ni °rt extravagant scale than 

does the European and con 
sumes more of everything than do the inhabitants of centra! 
Europe. A considerable portion of the difference in the con 
sumption of opium should, therefore, be put down as normal 
and due to the difference in the scale of living. Since the state- 
ments made by Dr. Wright have been quoted by all who com- 
ment on this subject, it is just as well to point out the statistical 
error involved in his failure to take into consideration the dif- 
ference in the scale of expenditures of the European and the 
American, as affecting the amount of opium legitimately con- 
sumed. Even making due allowance for this difference, how- 
ever, there still remains an excessive consumption of opium in 
the United States, and this we must reduce in some way. But 
we do not believe that the Foster bill is the right way. 
\ge 64. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Some one, in facetious mood, recently exclaimed, 
Give Us a while listening to the provisions of a budget of 
Rest bills affecting the practise of pharmacy which 

had been introduced into Congress and numerous 
state legislatures : "The only thing which remains for meddle- 
some legislators to do is to make it a felony, or at least a mis- 
demeanor, to practise pharmacy." While absurd enough at first 
thought, this remark is not so far from correct. It certainly 
does seem as if everything conceivable has been done in the 
national and state legislatures during the last few years to regu- 
late, supervise, limit and restrict the operation of all branches 
of the drug trade. Undoubtedly some of this legislation has been 
beneficial to the druggist as well as to the public at large, but it 
is equally patent that a large amount of recent legislation has 
accomplished little in the way of protecting the public and has 
imposed wholly unnecessary and heavy burdens upon the already 
overtaxed shoulders of the pharmacist. The druggist in almost 
every state in the union is already hedged in by so many laws, 
requirements, restrictions and limitations that he is frequently at 
a loss to know whether he is living up to the law of his city, 
state and country by observing all the various and frequently 
conflicting provisions of the municipal ordinances and national 
and state acts regulating the practise of his profession, but which 
do not affect the paint, grocery or other trades. In view of the 
meagre monetary return offered for the amount of energy and 
work put into it, pharmacy at best does not hold forth great 
rewards even for the most indefatigable practitioner; and when, 
as at present, it is surrounded with a multitude of restrictions, 
it is not surprising that it fails to tempt the young men of the 
country to enter it to the same extent as other professions and 
trades. It is surprising, therefore, that so many prominent 
pharmacists now feel disposed to advocate the enactment of addi- 
tional laws restricting their business still further through govern- 
mental regulation and supervision. It would seem that what 
pharmacy needs most just now in the way of legislation is the 
"rest cure" and' a serious effort to observe the laws already on 
the statute books. 

The Council of the Pharma- 
Dlspenslng by Doctors ceutical Society of Great Brit- 
in England am has resolved to ask for an 

investigation into the condi- 
tions under which the storage, compounding and dispensing of 
medicines are carried on by doctors. An inquiry has already 
taken place regarding the question of prescribing by pharmacists, 
and it seems only reasonable to expect the government will be 
willing to make the inquiry more complete by acceding to the 
request of the pharmaceutical society. The inquiry as to pre- 
scribing by pharmacists was conducted by 1,600 medical officers 
of health, who furnished particula rs concerning their own dis- 
tricts. The report based upon the information supplied by these 
medical officers constituted a remarkable attack upon pharma- 
cists. It stated that chemists do not know, or only imperfectly 
know, the disease they treat, and that consequently their pre- 
scribing is for the most part superficial and directed only to the 
symptoms, and in some instances cases are referred to doctors 
only in time for them to give a certificate of death. Infectious 
diseases, such as measles, scarlet fever, whooping cough, diph- 
theria and smallpox, were stated to be frequently overlooked by 

Index p 



chemists, and outbreaks of infectious diseases were attributed to 
this cause. It was alleged that children's skin diseases were 
wrongly treated, and that this sometimes necessitated a pro- 
longed absence from school. The treatment of infants' diseases 
by chemists, according to this report, has some bearing on infant 
mortality. Phthisis and cancer in the early stages are sometimes 
through improper treatment, aggravated, and in many cases 
become too advanced for effectual medical or surgical treatment 
afterward. Under the circumstances it is not surprising that 
pharmacists are up in arms. The British public needs much 
more protection from the dispensing doctor than from the pre- 
scribing chemist. 



Beginning today, Monday, Febru- 
The Pan American ^ry 13, there will be held in Wash- 
Conference ington a Pan-American Commercial 

Conference under the auspices of 
the Pan-American Union, which promises to be one of the most 
important gatherings, from a commercial point of view, which 
has been held in the United States for many years Over seven 
hundred delegates have already signified their intention to at- 
tend, and it is expected that this number will reach a thousand 
before the conference actually convenes. The delegates in- 
clude representatives from about 400 business firms, more than 
a hundred boards of trade and chambers of commerce, besides 
a long list of diplomatic and consular officials. The President 
of the United States, the Secretary of State, and other promi- 
nent officials are expected to attend. The large number of 
delegates shows the great interest which is being manifested 
throughout the United States in our commercial relations with 
the Latin Americas. The delegates include representatives from 
several of the leading manufacturers of pharmaceuticals and 
proprietary medicines. 

EXTRACTS OF THE THYREOID GLAND. 

K SIDE from some of the digestive preparations and the ex- 
•* tract of the suprarenal capsule, the thyreoid gland has 
proved by far the most useful of the opotherapeutic agents. In 
recent years it has come to be used in many conditions other 
than frank cretinism and myxcedema, and the demand for the 
drug has been met by the exploitation of numerous preparations. 
These preparations are notably variable in their efficacy, some 
of them being very active, while others possess but feeble ther- 
apeutic properties or are altogether inert. Moreover, the prod- 
ucts of the same firms have been found to vary in their activity 
at different times. 

I N an article in the February number of the American Journal 
* of Pharmacy, Dr. S. P. Beebe, of Cornell, present* a care- 
ful review of the chemistry of the thyreoid gland with a scheme 
for the standardization of preparations made from it. He states 
that the variation in such products is due not only to the dif- 
ference in the methods of preparation, but also to the variations 
in the activity of the glands used. The activity of the glands 
of different species of animals is quite different, and the glands 
from individuals of the same species are far from uniform. 
Sheep from some localities are very prone to the development 
of goitres, and as the abattoirs supply the thyreoids by the 
pound, they are apt to select the largest glands, and these patho- 
logical glands are deficient in the active principle. Beebe ad- 
age 65. 



26 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



vises, therefore, that much care be exercised in the selection 
of glands, so as to use normal glands only. 

r ~P HERE are numerous compounds of proteid and iodine in the 
■ thyreoid gland which possess varying degrees of toxicity 
and therapeutic value. That which is most abundant, and 
which Beebe believes to be least toxic and most active therapeu- 
tically, is a body resembling a globulin in its behavior with re- 
gard to dialysis and salt precipitation. It is obtained by ex- 
traction from the powdered gland with a jointly alkaline nor- 
mal saline solution, and precipitation from this by the addition 
of acetic acid and exposure to a temperature of 44 degrees C. 
for ten minutes. 

T N order to work out some scheme for standardizing thyreoid 
1 products, Beebe made analyses of the iodine content of a 
large number of normal human thyreoid glands, using the pro- 
teid obtained by the process described above. He states that 
the results of many iodine estimations are erroneous and 
emphasizes the importance of utilizing the improved method of 
Riggs (Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 31, 1909, 
p. 710, and vol. 32, 1910, p. 692). The series of analyses made 
after this method showed an average iodine content of 3.384 
milligrammes per gramme of the purified proteid. For the pur- 
pose of standardizing thyreoid proteid, it is considered that an 
amount equivalent to 3.384 milligrammes of iodine represents 1 
gramme of active thyreoid proteid, regardless of whether this 
proteid is richer or poorer in iodine than the standard. It may 
then be made up with lactose into tablets of absolutely known 
strength, whether the proteid is obtained from the pig's gland, 
which contains a relatively high proportion of iodine, or from 
the sheep's gland, which contains much less iodine. Prepara- 
tions made after the method of Beebe have been tested clinical- 
ly for over two and a half years, and it has been demonstrated 
that they are less toxic and quite as effectual as other thyreoid 
preparations, while they have the advantage of facilitating exact 
dosage. 



THE STANDARDIZATION OF DRUGS. 

""THAT the subject of the chemical and physiological stand- 
ardization of drugs is attracting constantly increasing at- 
tention is made evident from time to time, the latest instance of 
this being the presentation of a paper by the chief chemist of 
a manufacturing house who also occupies the chair of pharma- 
ceutical chemistry in the Medico-Chirurgical College of Phila- 
delphia. The author of the paper, Dr. Charles E. Vanderkleed, 
was necessarily limited in his treatment of the subject. In a 
single lecture it would be impossible for him or any other chem- 
ist to take up the subject in its minutest detail, leading up from 
the simplest assay processes to the most complex. That he is 
a' devotee of the subject was made plain by his comments on 
the fascination attaching to pharmaceutical assaying. As he 
said, there is enough variety in the work to prevent the irk- 
someness of routine and sufficient difficulties to challenge the 
ingenuity of the chemist to overcome them. 

\\7 HAT is really understood by a standardized drug or 
preparation is not that the drug or preparation has been 
merely assayed to determine the percentage of active constitu- 
ents, but that the substance has been adjusted to a definite 
strength. An exception to this is found in opium, which is 

/ ndex 



really standardized to contain from 12 to 12.5 percent, of mor- 
phine. It would obviously be a matter of the greatest difficulty, 
or an utter impossibility, to standardize all crude drugs, their 
constituents varying so greatly, and to attempt it would neces- 
sitate having always on hand a sufficient amount of each par- 
ticular drug, both above and below standard, with which to 
fortify or dilute to obtain the desired amount of standard drug. 
As gross drugs, with the exception of opium and ipecac, are 
little used in therapeutics, the necessity for standardizing them 
does not exist. As pointed out by Dr. Vanderkleed, a stand- 
ardized fluidextract or tincture would not necessarily result 
from the percolation of a standardized drug. The personal 
equation would enter into the problem, no two men being able 
to pack a percolator with the same degree of uniformity, and 
then the variations of temperature would contribute to nonuni- 
formity in the resultant percolates. Other considerations might 
arise which need not be elaborated here, but in the examination 
of the records of the percolation of a certain drug for several 
years, during which time assayed drugs were used, the fact was 
noted that the assays of the percolates varied greatly, thus 
demonstrating the difficulty of making standardized fluidextracts 
of tinctures from assayed drugs without assaying the fini>hed 
products. 

\ 17 E regret that limitations of space prevent the publication 
* * of Dr. Vanderkleed's paper in its entirety, as it contains 
much that is of important educational interest. Combined with 
a scientific treatment of the subject, he called attention to some 
points of practical importance to the dispensing pharmacist, 
such as, for example, the disturbing effect of standardization on 
color uniformity. The manufacturer is frequently called to ac- 
count because a new lot of tincture of belladonna is not so 
green as, or is a deeper brown in color than, the previous lot 
Again, a certain fluidextract may not seem to be quite so heavy 
as the last lot, and so on. The explanation is, of course, that 
one year's crop of a vegetable drug is exceedingly liable to dif- 
fer in its tinctorial content or weight of extractive from that 
of the previous season. Where such differences in color and 
weight are objected to by the patient or the physician they 
should be educated to the fact that nature observes no uni- 
formity in her productions. If it were otherwise we would be 
either a sadly commonplace or a brilliantly developed race of 
men and women, for it should not be forgotten that "variety's 
the very spice of life, that gives it all its flavor," and the same 
holds good of the crops of the fields. 

NEAR the close of his interesting paper the author spoke of 
the simplicity of the method of standardizing drugs to 
animal experimentation. So simple was the method as de- 
scribed by him that pharmacists who through long inactivity 
in analytical work would hesitate to undertake the chemical 
assay of a preparation should find no difficulty in applying the 
physiological method, and he urged that the introduction of this 
method into the Pharmacopoeia should not be opposed because 
of its supposed complexity. But it will be a long time we opine 
before any considerable number of pharmacists will care to un- 
dertake work of this kind that calls for the maintenance of a 
menagerie of small animals, and they are likely to continue tc 
depend largely on the manufacturing pharmacists for their sup- 
plies of physiologically standardized preparations. 

page 66. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



27 



ACACIA AND ITS USES IN PHARMACY. 

The Antiquity of the Gum — A Digression on the Capacity of Teaspoons — Acacia as an 

Excipient— Instances of Its Utility. 

BY J. LEON LASCOFF. 

Member of the New York State Board of Pharmacy, New York. 




THE applications of acacia in the preparation of mixtures, pill 
and capsule masses, and even ointments, are numerous : in 
some pharmaceutical manipulations acacia serves as a safety agent, 
insuring the proper equal division of the doses prescribed by 

the physician. Because pharma- 
cists are always careful to ob- 
serve the physician's directions 
as regards quantities, and the 
amount to be taken in a single 
dose, the use of a "shake'' label 
is often resorted to, but this is 
not always the best method to 
pursue. Such labels, however, 
are of great importance on 
some occasions, as in the case 
of soluble mixtures where pre- 
cipitation is apt to occur on 
standing. A well known in- 
stance of this is the mixture of 
tincture of hyoscyamus and 
solution of potassa, a combina- 
tion of a tincture containing an 
alkaloid with an alkali. The 
danger of an unequal division of 
J. LEON LASCOFF. doses is greatest, however, in 

die case of the more or less insoluble synthetic chemicals, of 
the coal tar series. 

The Antiquity of Acacia. 

From ancient times acacia has been known and used for the 
purpose of suspending drugs in mixtures. And just here it may 
be of interest to touch on the great antiquity of the gum. Ac- 
cording to Fliickiger and Hanbury (Pharmacographia), acacia 
was an article of commerce in the seventeenth century before 
our era, the Egyptian fleets bringing the gum from the Gulf of 
Aden. Mention of the gum is of frequent occurrence in Egyp- 
tian inscriptions. Among the ancient Greeks it was used as 
early as the third or fourth century before Christ. The word 
acacia is. indeed, of Greek origin, it being written ziadxa in the 
writings of Dioscorides, who was the author of a classical work 
on botany and medicine which had a great vogue in the four- 
teenth century and was translated into many languages, includ- 
ing the Arabic, Italian. Spanish, French and German, wnile 
numerous Greek and Latin versions are still extant. Pliny, who 
borrowed freely from Dioscorides, without giving credit, de- 
scribes the Egyptian gum (kami akanthe), which he valued at 
three denarii (50 cents) a pound. During the Middle Ages 
small supplies reached Europe through the Italian traders from 
Egypt and Turkey. 

The choicest variety of gum acacia is the fine white gum of 
Kordofan known as Picked Turkey Gum, but six or seven 
varieties of acacia figure in commerce, the Senegal gum from 
the French colony of Senegal, being much esteemed ; it is ob- 
tained from the same species of Acacia as the Kordofan, namely, 
Acacia Senegal. 

A Digression on the Capacity of Teaspoons. 

lo revert to the question of the equal division of doses and 
the danger arising from carelessness in the observance thereof, 
a word may be in season regarding the variations in teaspoons. 

"Read before the Brooklyn Pharmaceutical Association, January 23, 



191 1. 



When the physician prescribes doses of one fluid drachm he 
means that sixty minims shall be taken, but his intention is frus- 
trated if the patient uses any teaspoon that may be at hand. 
I have taken the trouble to collect a number of teaspoons from 
different customers and by determining their respective capacities 
found them to vary in measurement from ninety to one hundred 
and twenty minims. My attention was sharply directed to the 
variations in the capacity of teaspoons after having dispensed 
a prescription calling for morphine sulphate, gr. ii, in essence 
of pepsin, ji. the dose of which was 5i every hour until re- 
lieved. After the patient had taken the third dose he called 
me up and complained of distressing alter effects. Upon in- 
vestigation I found that the teaspoon he was using held no 
minims, so that the patient was actually taking half grain doses 
instead of the quarter grain doses prescribed. This occurred 
with a clean simple mixture. If the preparation had contained 
insoluble ingredients of perhaps a toxic nature held in suspen- 
sion, the result can be imagined. The only way to remedy 
matters is to advocate the use of accurately marked medicine 
glasses, verified and certified. 

Acacia an Inert Drug. 

While gum acacia is one of the most commonly used and 
indispensable adjuncts for the pharmacist which is official in 
all the pharmacopoeias of the world, it is yet the most inert and 
the least valuable therapeutically of all crude drugs. Only limited 
space is given to a description of it in the United States Phar- 
macopoeia, and all pharmaceutical text books dismissi it briefly. 
It is true that from the standpoint of the botanist, chemist or 
toxicologist, little can be said of the drug, other than to state 
its origin, nature, different varieties, adulterants and other facts 
of a pharmacognostical nature ; but as a practical pharmacist, 
acacia, in my opinion, heads a very important list. I have, there- 
fore, chosen this drug as a subject for discussion, particularly 
as it relates to dispensing, because I find it is a drug that has 
been considerably neglected. 

An Inert Drug. 

Acacia is sometimes used therapeutically for the relief of 
bronchial inflammation, gastrointestinal irritation, dry fauces, and 
as an emollient. Pharmaceutically it is used on account of its 
glutinous properties, having no chemical qualities worthy of con- 
sideration, except its acidity, due to the presence of arabic acid 
or acid calcium arabate. 

Acacia is indispensable (a pharmaceutical paradox) in cer- 
tain mixtures, solutions, pills, capsule masses, compressed tablets 
and even in some ointments, and it is far superior to tragacanth. 
which is insoluble in water, chondrus (the exact nature of which 
is not established and frequently contains traces of iodine and 
bromine), dextrin, starch, honey, glucose and glycerite of starch, 
all of which have individual objections, owing to their chemical 
nature, and their contraindications in therapeutics ; it is superior 
to paraffin and wax, which are insoluble in the intestinal tract. 
In fact, it comes to our assistance many times when everything 
else fails or is contraindicated. 

Acacia as an Excipient. 

In a good many cases acacia, either alone or in combination, 
is to be preferred as a pill excipient. John Howard Witherow 
in the American Journal of Pharmacy for September, 1889, page 
466, suggests a useful excipient for substances that are difficult 
to mass. This is directed to be made by dissolving with the 



Index page 67. 



28 AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



aid of gentle heat gum acacia, gr. C, and benzoic acid gr. v, in 
glycerin 311, with the addition of common glucose, 3iv. Another 
good formula consists of eight parts of pulverized acacia dis- 
solved in ten parts of glycerin by heating on a water bath until 
clear. Hager recommends the employment of one gramme of 
acacia to one hundred pills in the well known Pil. Asiaticae, 
which contains arsenic and black pepper. We see the importance 
of this mass when we consider the large dose of arsenic — about 
one twelfth of a grain in each pill. 

The French Pharmacopoeia of 1908 requires the use of gum 
arabic instead of gum tragacanth in Blaud's pills, while the 
United States Pharmacopoeia orders acacia as an excipient in 
ferrous iodide pills, phosphorus pills, and podophyllum, bella- 
donna and capsicum pills. 

Where acacia is referred to by me I mean the pure pulverized 
or finely granulated gum, free from starch, dextrin or artificial 
acacia necessary to turn out a uniformfi homogeneous mixture, 
mucilage, excepting where the latter is freshly prepared, since 
it deteriorates rapidly on standing, often becoming acid and 
mouldy. 

Instances of the Utility of Acacia. 

frequently in practical dispensing I have found the use of 
acacia necessary to turn out a uniform, homogenous mixture, 
and to provide for an equal division of doses, as in the following : 

Acid sodium oleate Gm. 0.1 

Acid salicylic Gm. 0.1 

Phenolphthalein Gm. 0.02 

Menthol Gm. 0.01 

M. ft. cap. Mitte No. xx. 
Sig. : One every four hours. 
It is difficult to make a proper mass of this compound, but 
it may be done as follows : Rub the menthol into a fine powder 
and mix with the salicylic acid and sodium oleate. As soon as 
the mass begins to liquefy add a few grains of pulverized acacia 
and a few drops of water, followed by one drachm of sugar of 
milk and the phenolphthalein, when a nice perfect white mass 
is produced, which may be divided into very small capsules. 

II. 

Oil of turpentine TTLxx 

Pulverized acacia gr. xxx 

Compound spirit of lavender 3i 

Spirit of chloroform 3i 

Castor oil Ji 

Water, sufficient to make 3 n 

It will be seen that a satisfactory emulsion cannot be turned 
out with the amount of acacia prescribed. The best way is to 
make an emulsion of the castor oil, using at least double the 
amount of acacia, and add the oil of turpentine and other in- 
gredients. 

III. 

Camphor Gm. 1.0 

Anisated solution of ammonia Cc. 3.0 

Infusion of digitalis Cc. 180.0 

M. 

In dispensing this prescription it will be found that if the 
camphor is dissolved in the alcohol which is contained in the 
infusion of digitalis, together with the anisated solution of 
ammonia, it will not remain in solution after the rest of the in- 
fusion is added, but will separate from the mixture and come 
to the surface. The best way to remedy this is to add a small 
quantity of acacia to the camphor and add the other ingredients 
in order, and so form a uniform mixture with the camphor in 
suspension. 

IV. 

Pyramidon Gm. 6.0 

Water ad Cc. 60.0 

Mt. et Sig. : Teaspoonful every two hours. 
We know that pyramidon (dimethylamidoantipyrine) is solu- 
ble in cold water only in the proportion of 1 in 15, though it is 
readily soluble in, warm water. In the proportions here given 
it is insoluble. If heated to the boiling point the pyramidon 
will be thrown down as an oily deposit. 

While the addition of acacia would make this a uniform 
mixture, objection has been made to its use because of some 
chemical incompatibility, the exact nature of which is unknown. 



The best course of procedure is to inform the physician of the 
insolubility of pyramidon in the amount of water prescribed and 
get him to increase the quantity and the dose. 

V. 

Benzosol Gm. 10.0 

Liquid lactopeptine Cc. 30.0 

Peppermint water Cc. 30.0 

The use of acacia is advised for the formation of an emulsion 

VI. 

Creosotal Cc. 8.0 

Glycerin Cc. 30.0 

Syrup of orange Cc. 20.0 

Peppermint water ad Cc. 120.0 

It is necessary in preparing this mixture to first emulsify the 
creosotal. 

VII. 

Creosote Cc. 0.12 

Balsam of tolu Gm. 0.2 

M. ft, pil. Mitte No. 50. 
It is easy enough to put this prescription in capsules, but to 
make pills of it the following method should be adopted: Emul- 
sify the creosote with a little acacia, adding finely pulverized 
balsam of tolu, with enough pulverized glycyrrhiza to make a 
suitable mass. 

VIII. 

Magnesium salicylate gr. v 

Make a compressed tablet. Send fifty doses. 
The powder is too fine to compress without granulating ami 
pulverized acacia is necessary to make a mass for granulation. 

IX. 

Olive oil, 

Balsam of Peru aa Gm. 60.0 

These drugs alone will not mix, but if a few drops of castor 
oil and a little acacia are first added to the balsam, and the 
olive oil is then incorporated, a satisfactory mixture will result. 

In the following prescription acacia is unnecessary if the 
proper method of compounding is observed. 

X. 

Ox gall Gm. 16.0 

Oil of turpentine Cc. 30.0 

Glycerin Cc. 120.0 

Ft. sol. Sig.: Dissolve one fourth part in a quart of watei 
and use as an enema. 

Compounded in the order in which the ingredients are named 
it will be impossible to produce a clear and uniform mixture : 
but by triturating the ox gall with a little of the glycerin and 
emulsifying the oil of turpentine with this, adding lastly the re- 
mainder of the glycerin, a satisfactory solution will be effected. 



Infusorial Earth in Bohemia. 

In a communication appearing in Daily Consular and Trade- 
Reports, Consul Will L. Lowrie, Carlsbad, Austria, 'says a num- 
ber of inquiries have been made of his office concerning deposits 
of kieselguhr (infusorial earth) in the Carlsbad consular dis- 
trict. This siliceous material occurs in the bogs where the mud 
is obtained for the famous '"moorbaeder" (mud baths) of the 
Bohemian health resorts. 

In the vicinity of Soos. a village at the foot of the Erzgebirge. 
the kieselguhr is found in small quantities in the mud of the 
bogs owned by the city of Carlsbad. It is not of any commer- 
cial value, owing to the fact that it is very limited in amount 
and is shipped only in small samples to collectors of minerals 
schools, etc. At Franzensbad the infusorial earth underlies the 
extensive bogs owned by the city. It is obtainable in almost un- 
limited quantity. No price is quoted by the municipality, and 
the quality has not been determined by analysis. 

The kieselguhr is white, yellowish, or gray in color, and exists 
here in chalklike form. It is molded, burred, or otherwise 
treated for the manufacture of pottery and statuary, gold edge-, 
papier-mache, dynamite, putty, adulterants for soap, caoutchou c, 
and carbolic acid preparations. A nonconductor of heat an I 
electricity, it is employed as a filling in the walls of ice chests 
and ice houses and for insulation purposes. Kieselguhr is alsi 
used for water purification in the Bergfeld filters. 

Index page 68. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



29 



CHRISTMAS IN CUBA 



The Oldest University in North Atmrica — Lofty Professional Ideals —American Pharmaceutical 

Association Will Be Invited to Meet in Havana. 
BY JOSEPH P. REMINGTON, Ph.JVl. 

Dean of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Chairman of the Committee of Revision of the United States 

Pharmacopoeia. 



ALTHOUGH I had promised some Cuban friends years ago 
to visit them, the opportunity came very suddenly, for I 
really could not tell whether I could go, until the day I left 
home. The weather in Philadelphia was atrocious, the streets 
were full of snow and slush, and winter's grip was everywhere. 

The route by steamer to Havana is usually preferred, but I 
could not spare six days on the ocean and so went by rail. The 
start was made on December 23, at 12.30 p. m., arriving at 
Havana on December 26, at 7 30 a. m., sixty-seven hours. The 
' last twelve hours of the journey were on the steamer from 
Knight's Key, Fla. Although a wireless message from the 
steamer Miami was sent to Professor Diaz, I was greatly sur- 
prised to hear shouts from a group of Cuban friends who had 
chartered a small steamer which was dancing up and down in 
the beautiful harbor, for our steamer had anchored right under 
the guns of Morro Castle and Cabanas. A few minutes sufficed 
to hustle the baggage on the tender, and greetings from the 
Cuban delegation followed. 

Christmas good feeling abounded, and the contrast between 
the frosty temperature of Philadelphia and the balmy June air 
, of Havara was great. The hospitality and warmth of welcome 
could not have been exceeded. From the upper floor of the 
Hotel Pasaje, which was soon reached, could be seen the frown- 
ing old castle in the harbor, the modern fortifications, the Male- 
con and the sea wall, the old part of the city w'ith its narrow 
streets, the ancient cathedral and churches, the picturesque cos- 
tumes, the men in straw hats and shirt sleeves, the market place 
filled with strange fruits and fish, and just below the beautiful 
l Prado, and a park filled with tropical plants and royal palm trees. 

Prosperous Pharmacists. 

' The pharmacists of Havana seem to be prosperous. It was 
' interesting to study the faces of the patients sitting in chairs 
1 or standing in front of the counters waiting for prescriptions 
which were being compounded by the busy assistants. Proprie- 
' tary medicines were, of course, in evidence, but the mass of the 
I Cuban people still believe in the sound doctrine of going to the 
; family doctor, and he still continues to send the prescription to 
\ the drug store on the corner. Co-operative organizations do not 
' seem to have prevailed against individual ownership. 

Conservative Methods. 

' In the large stores it was noticed that business was conducted 
1 on the sound, old-fashioned lines. The memory of the founder 
''of the house was in many stores perpetuated by oil portraits 
; suspended on the wall; the business in many cases carried on bv 
jithe sons. Old World ideas, and, of course, Spanish traditions 
I and customs, are still predominant. American preparations made 
', by our manufacturing pharmacists are carried in stock, but so 
1 are many of the products of the Old World. Foreign mineral 
! waters are largely consumed. In the older stores the furniture 
j was beautiful. Mahogany is and has been relatively cheap in 
J Cuba; carved pilasters, cornices, and panels, deepened by age 
j to a rich color, impress the visitor with the fact that the inten- 
j. tion of the founder and present proprietor was and is that phar- 
i macy as a profession and business should never "perish from off 
j the earth." In the outskirts of the city, and in the poorer streets, 
I a glimpse at the stores showed that even where expensive fur- 
nishings were out of the question, the spirit of permanence was 
■'there. 

6 

W\ Index 



The Open Shop of the Tropics. 

The visitor to drug stores in tropical and sub-tropical climates 
cannot fail to observe the open door and open shop tendency. 
This is particularly noticeable at night when traveling through 
the streets. The electric or illuminated sign "Botica" shows the 
passer-by or the customer seeking medical assistance, where it 
can be found, and he finds on the first floor of the building a 
room blazing with light, with the whole front apparently taken 
out, windows and doors not being in evidence. A long counter 
is usually built across the front, leaving eight or ten feet of 
space in the front for the use of the customers or patients. A 
practical druggist is at once struck with wonder as to how such 
a store can be kept clean on a dusty day; nevertheless there is 
plenty of ventilation, and this must be had in hot climates. The 
wholesale stores do a large jobbing business on the island and 
surrounding territories, but the retail and dispensing department 
is always in front. Warehouse space near the store must be had 
Two concrete warehouses are in process of construction to ac- 
commodate stock and furnish increasing facilities. These places 
of business were all visited, and nothing could exceed the cor- 
diality of the invitation to visit all parts of the stores. 

American Pharmaceutical Machinery. 

American machines for making pharmaceutical preparations 
such as compressed pills, mills for grinding drugs, sifters, emul- 
sifiers, etc., etc., were seen in all the large establishments. In 
passing through the stock department of one of the stores in the 
rear of the ground floor, an animal darted quickly between two 
barrels, and the proprietor, noticing my interest, called one of 
the laborers and said a few words in Spanish. The man made 
a sibilant sound, and instantly two animals from different parts 
of the floor cautiously approached. Dropping a few small pieces 
of meat on the floor, and stepping back a pace, I was delighted 
to see a mongoose, in fact three mongooses (or is it "mon- 
geese"?). The proprietor explained that they were necessary to 
destroy the rats, which they most effectually do. The fear of 
bubonic plague makes it necessary to continually wage war on 
rats. In answer to the question, "What about the multiplication 
of the mongoose, which is rapid?" it was explained that the ex- 
cessive production of this animal could be controlled. 

The University of Havana. 

The University of Havana and its faculty greatly impressed 
me. The selection of Professor Diaz as Spanish translator of 
the United States Pharmacopoeia has given a great impetus to 
things pharmaceutical in Cuba. His ability and agreeable per- 
sonality render him a favorite everywhere. Although he con- 
ducts a pharmacy personally, and has a fine business, and is thus 
a competitor, he is highly respected in business circles, and the 
druggists of Havana welcome him whenever he enters their 
stores. Our visit to the university was an event. The old build- 
ing on Obispo street is more than three hundred years old, and 
was formerly a Dominican monastery; but the new buildings 
stand on an elevated part of the city near Principe, which was 
formerly the Pirotechnia Militar, and occupied by Spanish troops. 
The buildings were remodelled after the evacuation, and fitted 
for the use of the university. The old monastery building is 
still used as a part of the university, and contains many valuable 
specimens illustrating ethnology, zoology, geology, and botany. 

page 69. 



3° 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Several of the rooms are given up to the education of children, 
as it is well located for this purpose. 

The view from the university grounds is surpassingly beauti- 
ful. The sea and the harbor, Morro and Cabanas, the cathedra! 
and churches, and large public buildings toward the east and the 
south, and beautiful country and distant mountains on the other 
side, made a picture never to be forgotten. On entering the 
grounds by the main stone stairway, the first sight impressed me 
with the fact that climatic conditions and geographical situations 
will assert themselves, for the hurricane which burst on Cuba 
on October 17, 1910, had razed to the ground the buildings de- 
voted to pharmacognosy, physics and the general lecture hall, for 
these departments ; the pharmaceutical laboratory and lecture 
rooms fortunately escaped. The buildings which were destroyed 
will soon be rebuilt. The accompanying illustrations show only 
the buildings which were not affected by the hurricane. 

The holiday season was on, and very few students were about 
the university, but there was everywhere evidence of activity 
and progressive spirit. 

Professor Alacan, whose department embraces pharmacog- 



estcd in the profession, are compelled to give most of their time 
to the practical question of earning bread and butter. But there 
are occasions when they all get together, and the real spirit of 
the men is shown. The National Pharmaceutical Association of 
Cuba has been established, with Senor Gerardo Fernandez Abreu 
as president. Many of its members are members of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, and they are all enthusiastic 
for the advancement of pharmacy and hope to induce the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association to hold one of its annual meet- 
; ngs in Havana. Five of their number, headed by Senor Fran- 
cisco Herrara, have promised to attend the next meeting in Bos- 
ton. They hope to establish a branch of the parent organization 
in Havana in a short time. 

In another year it is hoped that Mr. Flagler will finish the 
construction of the Florida East Coast Railway. This great en- 
gineering feat is rapidly approaching completion with its ter- 
minus at Key West. This would give a most convenient means 
of reaching Havana by rail from all parts of the United States, 
with, merely six hours' steamer trip over the Florida Straits. 
Splendid steamers, having fine accommodations, are now run- 




PROFESSOR REMINGTON AND FACULTY AND STUDENTS OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF HAVANA. 

(1) Dr. Francisco Hen-era, (2) Dr. Fernandez Abreu, president of the Cuban Pharmaceutical Association: (3) Prof. Joseph 
P. Remington, (4) Dr. J. G. Diaz, professor in the university; (5) Dr. Jose P. Alacan. professor in the university; (6) 

Dr. Henaiz, professor in the university. 



nosy, materia medica, and botany, occupies a separate building, 
and it is interesting to record that the genial professor is a prac- 
tical retail druggist with an up to date pharmacy situated among 
the best residences in Havana. 

American Pharmaceutical Association Will Be Invited to Meet 
in Havana. 

As in every city throughout the world, two distinct lines of 
pharmaceutical development were noted. The larger, and need 
I say most opulent, class are those who conduct stores and give 
the most attention to business. The smaller number are inter- 
ested in the educational and professional side of the calling. 
Then, of course, there is a middle class who, while deeply inter- 

Index 



ning from New York to Havana. With the persistence and 
determination now actuating our Cuban brethren, a meeting of 
the parent association on the beautiful island of Cuba is a prac- 
tical project for the near future. 

The U. S. Pharmacopoeia. 

The United States Pharmacopeia. Spanish translation, is 
found in many drug stores. Time was found to make a flying 
trip to the Isle of Pines. At Batabano, the southernmost point 
of Cuba, railroad terminated, and the traveler embarked on the 
staunch though small steamer Cristobal Colon, which rolled 
mightily on the moonlight trip. Nueva Jerona, the principal 
town on the Isle of Pines, was reached early the next morning, 

page 70. 




THE UNIVERSITY OF HAVANA. 

-aboratory of Hygiene, Legal Medicine and Toxicology; 2, "Estrada Palma" Clinical Laboratory of the School of Medicine: 3. Group of Pro- 
lessors of the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy; 4, View of the Botanical Garden; 5, Dr. Leopold Berril y Fernandez, Rector of the Uni 
yersity: 6. General View of the Froi.t and Southeastern Corner of the Central Building of the University; 7. Library of the University; 8. View 
in one of the Patios or Courtyards of the University; q. Garden and Central Buildine of the University from the Main Gateway. 



32 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



and a friend put me up at the American Club. Immediately 
opposite, a small sign bearing the well known word "Botica" 
directed my attention to the drug store. The proprietor, Senor 
Eniilio Trillo Carballo, who had just opened his new store, 
greeted me. In a moment he turned to his dispensing room and 
brought forth a copy of the Pharmacopoeia. He handled it as 



UIMIVERSIDAD DE LA HABANA 



ESCUELA DE FARMACIA - LABORATORIO OE FARMACIA 



conviction that he leaves a friend in every one of the person: 
with whom he has beeen associated and that as Cubans we an 
grateful to the noble and powerful country that came to help 
us in an effective manner to obtain our independence and liberty 

Professor Remington, in the name of the City of Havana 
in that of our university, of the Cuban Pharmaceutical Associa 
lion, of the Academy of Sciences and of all the pharmacists oi 
Cuba, receive our enthusiastic felicitations. 

Gentlemen : Let us raise our glasses and drink to the healti 
of Professor Remington, and of all belonging to him, in gratitudt 
to his beloved Philadelphia and to the prosperity of the Amer 
ican nation. 



A LIST OF ANAESTHETICS. 



PREPARACION DEL ALUMNO 

Dia de de 190 




Labels used in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Havana. 

if it were very precious, and showed a familiarity with its con- 
tents. He was very proud of the fact that he was a graduate of 
the University of Havana. This incident is significant, for the 
Isle of Pines is very sparsely settled, and adherence to Spanish 

customs are strong. 



The Banquet to Professor Remington. 

The Diario de la Marina, one of the leading newspapers of 
Cuba, on January 8 contained a report of the visit of Pro- 
fessor Remington to Havana and of the banquet which was 
tendered to him by the Cuban- Pharmaceutical Association at 
the Louvre on January 5. This banquet was presided over by 
the dean of the faculty of letters and science, Dr. Evelio Rod- 
riguez Leudin. The speakers included Dr. Julio D. Cardenas, 
mayor of the city; Dr. Santos Fernandez, the president of the 
Academy of Sciences; Dr. Gerado Fernandez, president of the 
Cuban Pharmaceutical Association ; Prof. J. Guillermo Diaz, the 
translator of the United States Pharmacopoeia, and the guest 
of honor, who praised the work done by Professor Diaz in the 
translation of the Pharmacopoeia. One of the most striking 
features of the banquet was the brief address in English of 
Professor Diaz, which follows: 

All of you know, and Professor Remington knows well, that 
I do not speak English, but duty obliges me tonight to address 
a word to you in the language of our guest, even at the risk of 
not being understood by him. Professor Remington is well 
known amongst us as the author of scientific works, as dean of 
the College of Pharmacy of Philadelphia, as member of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association. Of the success he has 
obtained in all these noble undertakings it may be said with the 
immortal poet : 

"I dare do all that may become a man 
Who dares do more is none." 

T congratulate myself for having contributed to his coming 
here and that he has bee: with us. May he carry with him the 



Including General Anaesthetics, Local Anaesthetics and Anaes 
thetic Mixtures, Both Past and Present ; with Synonyms. 



By Charles Baskerville, Ph. D., F. C. S., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Director of the Laboratory, 
College of the City of New York. 
New York. 

A. C. E. Mixture. — An anaesthetic mixture containing a! 
cohol, 1 part; chloroform, 2 parts; ether, 1 part; introduce* 
by Robert Ellis in 1866. 

Acetic Ether. — See Ethyl Acetate. 

Acetone. — Possesses anaesthetic properties. 

Acetone-Chloroform. — See Chloretone. 

Acoine (Di-para-anisyl-monophenetyl-guanidin hydrochlo 
ride; "Acoine C ). — A local (dental and ophthalmic) anaes 
thetic. Acoine is also used in Schleich's infiltration anaes 
thesia. Heyden Chemical Works, New York. 

Aether Anaestheticus Aranii. — In the chlorination of ethy 
chloride, the beta series of isomers are obtained, and the>< 
are also produced in the manufacture of chloral. A variabli 
mixture of the middle members of the series is Liquor An 
aestheticus. Another similar mixture, containing the les: 
chlorinated bodies, is the Aether anaestheticus Aranii, whlcl 
boils between 64° and ioo° C. See Ethylidene Chloride. 

Aether Anaestheticus (Koenig). — A local anaesthetic com 
posed of alcohol-free ether, 1 part, with 4 parts of rhigolene 

Aether Anaestheticus Wiggers. — This anaesthetic contain: 
the more highly chlorinated products referred to undo 
Aether Anaestheticus Aranii, and boils between ioo° and 140' 
C. See Ethyl Chloride Polychlorated. 

Aether Chloratus. — See Ethyl Chloride. 

Aetho-Methyl (Thilo). — A mixture of ethyl and methy 
chlorides. 

Aethoxycaffeine. — Used with sodium salicylate (Ceola). 

Alypin. — The hydrochloride of benzoyl-tetramethyl-dia 
mino-ethyl isopropyl alcohol; used as a local anaesthetic. Sei 
Pharm. J., 1905, 869. Continental Color and Chemical Co. 
New York. 

Amidin. — See Holocain Hydrochloride. 

Amino-Cinnamic Ethyl Ester. — A local anaesthetic whicl 
niet with little success commercially. 

Amyl Chloride. — Richardson, in 1869, found that this com 
pound produces slow but prolonged anaesthesia. 

Amyl Hydride — See Hydramyl and Pentene. Amyl hy 
dride was proposed as an anaesthetic by Bigelow in 1867, bu 
Richardson found it to be dangerous. 

Amyl Nitrite (Tsoamyl nitrite.) — This compound was in 
troduced as an anaesthetic by Richardson in 1863. but is nc 
longer employed as such. 

Amylene ( Reta-isoamylene ; trimethylethylene ; valerene 
pentene).— This highly inflammable compound was proposec 
as an anaesthetic by John Snow in i8?6; it has been used ai 
a dental anaesthetic, but great caution is necessary. ?e< 
Trimethylethylene. 

Anaemorenine. — This preparation consists of 5 Cc. ot i 
1 percent, solution of suprarenal extract, and another solu- 
tion containing per Cc. 0.003 Gm. of tropacocaine hydro- 
chloride and 0.002 Gm. of sodium chloride. Roth soluti< ns 
are mixed before use. Moller describes "anaemorenine M as 
specially adapted for dental purposes. 

Anaesthesine, Ritsert's (para-amido-ethyl benzoate. — Said 
to be one of the most successful local anaesthetics. Victor 
Koechl & Co., New York. 

Anaesthetic Mixture (Reynes). — This consists of chloro- 
form. 2 parts; ether and absolute alcohol. 1 part each. 



Index page- 72. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



33 



Anaestheticum. — A dental anaesthetic; said to be a 10 per- 
cent, solution of cocaine in phenyl acetate. 

Anaestheticum (Edison's). — A mixture of chloral, alcohol, 
chloroform, camphor, oil of cloves, oil of peppermint, ether, 
salicylic acid, amyl nitrite, and morphine sulphate. 

Anaestheticum Bottwini. — A mixture of 3 parts of each of 
menthol and crystalline phenol, with 1 part of cocaine hydro- 
chloride. 

Anaesthin and Anaesthol (Speyer). — Five parts of ethyl 
chloride and 1 part of methyl chloride. 

Anaesthol (W. Meyer).— Seventeen percent of ethyl chlo- 
ride and 83 percent, of a mixture consisting of ether 74 Gm. 
and chloroform 119.5 Gm.; this medium is administered like 
chloroform and induces a sleeplike state of narcosis. 

Anaesthol (Weidig's). — Anaesthol is a molecular solution 
of ether and chloroform with 17 percent, by volume of ethyl 
chloride; that is, 17 percent, of ethyl chloride, 35.89 per- 
cent, of chloroform, and 47.10 percent, of ether. It possesses 
the distinguishing advantage of volatilizing at a temperature 
slightly above that of the body, so that its elimination is 
properly regulated by the lungs without imposing any strain 
on other parenchymatous organs, and accumulation or re- 
tention involving risk to the patient is excluded. It boils at 
40° C. Lehn & Fink, New York. See J. Am. Med. Assn., 
February 28, 1903. 

Anaesthyle. — See Anaesthol (W. Meyer). 

Anaestiform (Oppenheimer). — Cocaine hydrochloride and 
renaglandin in distilled extract of witch-hazel, containing in 
addition the sulphates of sodium and ammonium. 

Analgos (Stephan).-— A dental local anaesthetic consisting 
of a mixture of thymol, menthol, phenol, aspirin, and sodium 
chloride, each 1 Gm., with 0.5 of cocaine hydrochloride, dis- 
solved in 95 Gm. of diluted alcohol. 

Anesin or Aneson. — (See Chloretone). A patented aque- 
ous solution containing 1 percent, of acetone chloroform; 
local anaesthetic and substitute for cocaine in infiltration and 
Oberst's regionary anaesthesia. 

Anesthesin. — See Anaesthesine. 

Anesthol (Meyer). — A mixture of chloroform, 43.25 parts; 
ether, 56.75 parts; and ethyl chloride, 20.5 parts. 

Anesthol (Weidig). — A mixture of 2 parts of chloroform 
and 2.5 parts of ether; or 43.25 volumes of chloroform, 56.75 
volumes of ether, and 20.5 volumes of ethyl chloride. Said 
to be a safe inhalation anaesthetic. See Anaesthol (Weidig). 

Anesthyl. — A local anaesthetic containing methyl chloride, 
1 part and ethyl chloride, 5 parts. 

Anestyle. — See Anaesthol. 

Anestyle-Bengue. — A mixture of ethyl and methyl chlo- 
rides. 

Anodyne. — See Ethyl Chloride. 

Antidolorin. — A purified ethyl chloride. Franco-Amer- 
ican Chemical Works, Carlstadt, N. J.; Norwich Pharmacal 
Co., New York. 

Aran's Anaesthetic Ether. — See Aether Anaestheticus, 
Aranii. 

Arnold's Dental Anodyne or Local Anaesthetic. — Acetic 
acid is neutralized with ammonium carbonate and the mix- 
ture saturated with salicylic acid. The whole is then filtered 
and treated with cocaine hydrochloride (En?. Pat. 7061, 
1887). 

Benesol. — A local anaesthetic used in dental surgery and 
containing eucaine, cocaine hydrochloride, phenol, menthol, 
eucalyptol, and amyl nitrite, in solution in sterilized distilled 
water. 

Benzene (Benzole). — John Snow, in 1848, found that ben- 
zene is an indifferent anaesthetic with severe after-effects. 

Benzoyl Peroxide — This compound is slightly anaesthetic 
locally. Hynson, Westcott & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Benzoyl-Tropein. — A local anaesthetic. 

Benzoyl Vinyl Diacetonalkamin. — See Eucaine B. 

Beta-ethyltetramethyidiaminoglycerine Benzoyl Mono- 
chloride. — Said to be of value as a local anaesthetic. 

Beta-Eucaine. — See Eucaine B. 

Billroth's Mixture. — A mixture of chloroform and ether. 

Boro-Chloretone. — A mixture of boric acid, 3 parts and 
chloretone. t part, used as an antiseptic anaesthetic. 

Brenzcain (Guaiacolbenzyl ester; pyrocatechin-methyl- 
benzyl ester). — A local anaesthetic prepared by Merck. Used 
by Marcus for the induction of local anaesthesia by means of 
cataphoresis. 

Bromic Ether. — See Ethyl Bromide. 



Bromoform. — "Formyl tribromide" is generally consid- 
ered to be unsafe to use as an anaesthetic; the ordinary prep- 
aration deteriorates very rapidly. 

Butyl-Chloral Hydrate (Trichlorbutylidene glycol). — Pro- 
posed by Liebreich in 1870 as a ;emedy for trigeminal neu- 
ralgia. In medicinal doses it produces deep sleep with an- 
aesthesia of the head. 

Butyl Chloride. — Richardson, in 1869, found that this com- 
pound has the same anaesthetic action as amyl chloride. 

Butyl Hydride. — Physiological action identical with that 
of amyl hydride. 

Camphor Phenylated (Phenol Camphor). — A local anaes- 
thetic, chiefly dental. 

Canadol. — A very light petroleum ether ("light ligroin"), 
of the specific gravity 0.650 — 0.700; a local anaesthetic. 
Merck & Co., New York. 

Carbolic Acid. — Phenol has found use as a local anaes- 
thetic. 

Carbon Dioxide. — This gas was proposed by Snow as an 
anaesthetic in 1848. 

Carbon Disulphide. — Although Nnnneley introduced car- 
bon disulphide for complete anaesthesia in 1S49, it has only 
found employment as a local anaesthetic. 

Carbon Monoxide. — Nunneley proposed carbon monoxide 
as an anaesthetic in 1849. Although dangerous to the human 
economy, it was used on lower animals by Richardson. 

Carbon Tetrachloride. — A. Sansom introduced "chloro- 
carbon" for inhalation in 1867; however, it was but little used 
for this purpose, although it has been employed as a local 
anaesthetic. 

Chelene. — See Ethyl Chloride. 

Chloraethoform. — Chloroform containing 0.25 percent, of 
ethyl chloride. See Chemist and Druggist, 1904, 1289. 

Chloral Acetone Chloroform (Cloran). — A Compound 
formed by the condensation of molecular quantities of chlo- 
ral hydrate or chloral and acetone-chloroform; it possesses 
local anaesthetic properties. Hoffman-La Roche Works, New 
York. 

Chloralamide. — Trichloramido-ethylic alcohol, a hypnotic 
and analgetic, has been used as an anaesthetic. 

Chloralformamide. — A hypnotic; said to be uninjurious. 
Chloralimide. — As for Chloralamide. 

Chloral Hydrate. — This has been used as a general anaes- 
thetic. 

Chloral-Orthoform. — Amido-oxybenzoic esters combined 
with chloral, have been found to act as local anaesthetics. 
Lehn & Fink, New York. 

Chloramyl. — Chloroform one pound, mixed with 2 drachms 
of amyl nitrite. 

Chlorbutane. — Has been employed for producing total an- 
aesthesia. See Butyl Chloride. 

Chlorbutanol. — See Chloretone. 
Chlorethyl. — See ethyl chloride. 

Chlorethylene Chloride. — See ethylene monochloro chlo- 
ride. 

Chloretone. — (Acetone cWoroform: "Anesin"; "Aneson"). 
— This preparation is the tertiary trichlorbutyl alcohol, and is 
used as a local anaesthetic and internal hypnotic. Acetone 
chloroform was discovered in 1881 by Willgerodt. and its so- 
lution (see Anesin) is said to produce no local irritation and 
no toxic symptoms. Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Chloriden. — See Ethylidene Chloride. 

Chlorocarbon. — See Carbon Tetrachloride. 

Chloroform. — Well known as a medium for total anaes- 
thesia. E. R. Squibb & Sons. New York; Mallinckrodt Chem- 
ical Works, St. Louis, Mo.; Powers-Weightman-Rosen?arten 
Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; Albany Chemical Company, Al- 
bany, N. Y.; Merck & Co., New York; Parke, Davis & Co., 
Detroit. Mich.; Schering & Glatz, New York; and Roessler & 
Hasslacher, New York. 

Chloromethane. — See Methyl Chloride. 

Chloryl (Coryl). — An anxsthetic mixture consisting of 
methyl and ethyl chlorides: it is said to be milder in action 
than ethyl chloride. 

Cloran. — See Chloral-Acetone Chloroform. 

Cocaethyline (Ethyl-benzoylecgonine). — A local anaesthetic 
like cocaine, but milder. 

Cocaine. — Methyl-benzoylecgonine is a well known local 
anaesthetic. For an investigation of its recommended substi- 
tutes, see Le Brocq, Pharm. J., 82, 673. 

(To be continued.') 



Index page 7;. 



34 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



AN APPARATUS FOR KEEPINO LIME WATER. 

By Otto Raubenheimer, Ph. G., 

Brooklyn, X. Y. 

I read the abstract of Bulletin No. 150 of the Kentucky Ex- 
periment Station, as published on page 12 of the American 
Druggist for January 9, with much interest. I can bear testi- 
mony to the advantages of the lime water apparatus there illus- 
trated, because as early as the summer of 1902 (see Proc. A. Ph. 
A., vol. 55, p. 180) I constructed such an apparatus, which is 
still in use, and is, indeed, one of the ornaments and attractions 
of the front part of my store. It consists of a large Woulff bot- 
tle, one neck of which is fitted with a syphon acting as an out- 
let for the lime water. The other neck is filled with a glass tube 
admitting air, which first passes through a solution of potassium 
hydroxide before entering the apparatus. In this way the water 
is kept free from carbon dioxide. The apparatus was described 
by me before the Section in Practical Pharmacy and Dispensing 
of the A. Ph. A. at the New York meeting, September, 1907, to- 
gether with another continuous and automatic lime water ap- 
paratus. My paper was published in Volume 55 of the Pro- 
ceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association, page 179, 
and in the American Druggist for October 7, 1907, page 229, 
as well as in other journals. 

To prepare lime water the pharmacist should not use ordinary 
lime obtained from a builder or mason, but lime of pharmaco- 
pceial quality, that is, calcined white marble, and he should not 
use ordinary hydrant water, but distilled water, which is free 
from carbon dioxide. With these two requirements and by fol- 
lowing the official modus operandi, which I have divided into five 
steps (see Proc. A. Ph. A., Vol. 55, p. 189, or American Drug- 
gist, Vol. 51, p. 229), a full strength liquor calcis can be pre- 
pared, and by means of the apparatus can be kept and dispensed. 
However, I cannot agree with Mr. Brown as to preparing lime 
water in ten gallon lots or more. The quantity prepared will 
necessarily depend on the demand, but should be so regulated as 
not to last much longer than two weeks. It is much better to 
prepare small quantities at frequent intervals than to prepare a 
supply to last for months. Besides the point already mentioned, 
I wish to denounce the common practice of filling up the lime 
water jug with water, usually hydrant water, without renewing 
the supply of lime, and also of filtering lime water. It has been 
pruven, and I have made numerous tests, that filter paper will 
absorb some of the lime. The U. S. P. correctly states that lime 
water should be decanted : p. 260, "Pour off the clear liquid 
when required for use." 



The Physiological Standardization of Drugs. 

A committee of the Philadelphia branch of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association, of which Dr. H. C. Wood, jr., is 
chairman, has made a study of the advisability of introducing 
into the Pharmacopoeia physiological tests for the following 
drugs : Apocynum, convallaria, digitalis, squill, strophanthus, 
aconite, gelsemium, lobelia, veratrum, cannabis, ergot, pepsin, 
suprarenals, thyroid, granatum, kousso, santonica. cimicifuga, 
gossypii cortex, and Phytolacca. 

The three last named substances they regarded as of too little 
importance to require standardization. With regard to the ver- 
mifuges, it seemed quite possible that ultimately such tests might 
be found useful, although at present too little is known about 
them. The committee reported unfavorably with regard to can- 
nabis, as they deemed the physiological tests for this drug to be 
too unreliable to be officially recommended. The most useful 
physiological tests for ergot require either the use of a con- 
siderable series of animals for each test, which makes the pro- 
cedure impracticable for any but the largest wholesale manu- 
facturers, or else the use of a standard preparation for com- 
parison. The difficulties of keeping such a standard undeterior- 
ated practically preclude the latter system. Thyroid gland does 
not in their opinion require standardization, as the work of 
Hunt has shown that the percentage of combined iodine is an 

Index 



accurate indicator of the quality of the substance, and they be- 
lieve that wherever a chemical test is equally available, it should 
be given the preference over a physiological one. 

Veratrum depends for its physiological effect upon a number 
of alkaloids which are quite different in their effects, and the 
committee does not therefore believe that the physiological test 
suggested — that is the amount necessary to kill — is of any prac- 
tical importance. They believe that some method of chemical 
standardization could be devised. For aconite they approved of 
the test depending upon the amount required to kill a given 
weight of guinea pig within twenty-four hours. The technique 
of the test is as follows : From the specimen to be tested a fluid 
extract is made according to the official process. Four guinea 
pigs are then carefully weighed and into two of them is injected 
beneath the skin of the belly an equivalent of 0.0004 Gm. of 
aconite for each Gm. of body weight, and into the other two is 
injected 0.0005 Grn. per Gm. of body weight. If the first pair 
dies it is too strong. If the second pair survive it is too weak. 
If one of each pair dies and the other lives the test should be 
repeated. 

The members of the digitalis group, apocynum, convallaria. 
digitalis, squill and strophanthus, were considered together. It 
was concluded that as there is no satisfactory method of chemi- 
cal standardization for any of these drugs, the adoption of a 
physiological method of assay would be advisable. After re- 
viewing the various tests proposed, they recommended the tox- 
icity for guinea pigs as the most satisfactory. In fhe case of 
digitalis the proper strength was described as that of which not 
less than 0.35 Mg. nor more than 0.40 Mg. per Gm. of body 
weight was required to kill a guinea pig within twelve hours. 

The committee recommended that suprarenal gland should 
be, subjected to a physiological test, the proper strength being 
such that 1 Gm. injected intravenously into a dog shall produce 
a rise of mean blood pressure within 10 Mm. of mercury of that 
produced in the same animal by a dose of 0.001 Gm. of the 
pure active principle. The technique of the test is fully described 
The report may be found in full in the Bulletin of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association for January, 1910. 



Cosmetic Formulas. 

Some suggestive formulas for complexion beautifiers are con- 
tained in a French medical formulary entitled "Formulaire 
synthetique de medicine" the author of which is Dr. L. Pron, 
and the pubhsher, Jules Rousset, Paris. The following are 

selections : 

Complexion Balms. 

French dermatologists recommend the addition to the water 
used for washing the face and hands of a tablespoonful of one 
or other of the following balsamic milks: 

I. 

Tincture of tolu 5'ss 

Rose water Oi 

M. 

II. 

Tincture of benzoin 5iss 

Sodium carbonate gr. Ixxv 

Eau de Cologne Oi 

M. 

in. 

Sodium borate 5iiss 

Sodium carbonate gr. Ixxv 

Rose water Jvi 

Tincture of benzoin 51 

Eau de Cologne Jviii 

M. 

Wrinkle Remover. 

Aluminum sulphate 5i 

Milk of almonds 51SS 

Rose water 5vi 

M. 

Apply to the wrinkles morning and evening as a lotion. 
page 74. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



35 



Notes 



Queries 



Answers 



Guaranty Registration Under the Pure Food and Drug 
Act. — M. D. writes : "I am preparing a mouth wash and gargle 
to retail at 25 cents a bottle. Is it necessary for me to register 
it under the pure food and drugs act, and if so, how should I 
proceed ?" 

Except for the protection of retailers and the increased con- 
fidence they would have in selling the mouth wash it is not 
absolutely necessary to register the article and give it a guar- 
anty number. It is, however, compulsory under the act to 
state on the label of the container the quantity or proportion 
of any alcohol, morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, alpha or beta 
eucaine, chloral hydrate, acetanilide, or any derivative or prepa- 
ration of any such substances contained in mixtures put up for 
sale to the public. 

The form of guaranty is given in regulation 9 for the en- 
forcement of the act, as published in the American Druggist 
for March 14, 1910, at page 145. The guaranty may be filed 
with the Secretary of Agriculture, who in turn gives the manu- 
facturer or dealer a serial number, which number must be 
printed on every package of goods sold under the guaranty. 
The following form of guaranty meets with the approval of the 
authorities charged with the enforcement of the act : 

I (we) the undersigned do hereby guarantee that the articles 
of foods or drugs manufactured, packed, distributed, or sold by 
me (us) [specifying the same as fully as possible] are not adul- 
terated or misbranded within the meaning of the food and drugs 
act, June 30 t 1906. 

(Signed in ink) 

[Name and place of business of wholesaler, dealer, manu- 
facturer, jobber or other party.] 

As has been said it is not necessary to file a guaranty with 
the Secretary of Agriculture. But any independent guaranty 
issued by a manufacturer "should identify and be attached to 
the bill of sale, invoice, bill of lading or other schedule giving 
the names and quantities of the articles sold." 

Baking Powder. — W. A. C. — The following furnishes a 
satisfactory article of baking powder : 

Sodium bicarbonate 3ii 

Pulverized rice j$ifi 

Cream of tartar ^iv 

M. 

The Removal of Chrysarobin Stains. — A Correction. — Otto 
Raubenheimer writes: "Request is often made of the practical 
pharmacist for a method of removing the stains made by chry- 
sarobin ointment on linen, etc., since they cannot be removed 
in the ordinary way by washing or cleaning fluids. In fact, 
alkalies or bleaching agents only seem to fix the stains more 
securely. The valuable information contained in the 'druggists' 
bible,' the United States Pharmacopoeia, can also be made use 
of for such technical purposes. The statement made on page 
100 that chrysarobin is soluble in 18 parts of chloroform and 
25 parts of benzene or benzole (C„He) induced me to make ex- 
periments with chrysarobin stains, when the occasion arose. Both 
chloroform and benzole will remove such stains, and as the 
latter is less expensive and also less toxic, I have since recom- 
mended the use of this to customers. I have also tried benzin, 
i. e., petroleum benzin, which of course is cheaper, but this will 
not remove the stains, as chrysarobin is insoluble therein. There- 
fore I do not agree with the statement made in the American 
Druggist of January 9, 191 1, on page 29, that 'chrysarobin 
stains are best removed by the aid of benzin,' which should 
rather read 'benzole.' I have taken the pains to look up the 
original article in Vol. VI, 1909, of Vierteljahresschrift fur 

Index 



Praktische Pharmazie, published by the Deutsche Apotheker 
Verein, Berlin, and I find on page 70 that benzol is recommended 
and not benzin." 

Unguentum Crede.— H. & C— Crede's ointment, as it is 
termed by our correspondent — the maker's name for it is un- 
guentum Crede — is an ointment imported from Germany by 
Schering & Glatz, 150 Maiden lane, New York. It is a com- 
pound of collargollum (colloidal silver), 15 percent., with a 
suitable ointment basis. 

Tablet Making and Machinery.— II. N. B. C— We think 
we cannot do better in the circumstances than to refer you to 
a small book on Tablet Manufacture, Its History, Pharmacy 
and Practice, by Joseph R. Wood, M. A., Ph. G, which is pub- 
lished by J. B. Lippincott Company, of Philadelphia, at the price 
of $2. Illustrations and descriptions are given of the various 
machines in use by the leading manufacturers, and we feel con- 
fident if you are contemplating the manufacture of tablets that 
you will thank us for the reference. It answers your inquiry 
much better than we could in the limited time and space at our 
command for this purpose. We may say that a machine of 
the hand type which is regarded with considerable favor is 
made by Whitall Tatum Company, New York, and is known 
as their "No. 25" machine. A good type of an automatic com- 
pressing machine which is adapted for hand and for power for 
turning out tablets in a large way is the Mulford tablet ma- 
chine, built by H. K. Mulford Company, Philadelphia. One 
of the newer machines on the market which is adapted for 
hand or for power is made by F. J. Stokes Machine Company, 
Philadelphia. Another maker of tablet machines is the firm of 
Arthur Colton Company, of Detroit, Mich. 

Methods of Mirroring Glass. — There seems to be a spe- 
cial demand at the present time for methods of mirroring glass, 
two inquiries having been received on the same day from such 
widely separated parts of the country as Hopedale, Ohio, and 
Auburn, N. Y. 

One of the most satisfactory processes from a pharmaceu- 
tical point of view was contributed to this journal by Frank 
Edel several years ago. Before giving this formula it is neces- 
sary to point out that the utmost care must be employed in 
cleansing the glass, so as to remove completely any traces of 
grease or dirt. The slightest suspicion of grease is fatal to 
the success of the operation, consequently the glass should first 
be carefully washed with a solution of ammonia water applied 
with pledgets of absorbent cotton, followed afterward by a 
weak bath of hydrochloric acid of the strength of 1 in 100. The 
glass is then dried and polished with a clean linen cloth. The 
silvering solutions are made and applied as follows : 
Solution No. 1. 

Silver nitrate Jiii 3i 

Strong ammonia sufficient 

Distilled water sufficient 

Alcohol I |j 

Dissolve the silver nitrate in 6 fluid ounces of distilled wa- 
ter, and add ammonia gradually until the brown precipitate at 
first formed is just dissolved, no more. In order to guard 
against an excess of ammonia it is always best to add a little 
solution of silver nitrate (16 to 18 grains in an ounce of dis- 
tilled water) to the ammoniated silver solution until the solu- 
tion is permanently turbid again. Then filter through a double 
paper filter, turning back till it comes through clear, and add 
distilled water through the filter to make 12 ounces; add alco- 
hol, 1 ounce, place in a clean bottle, and shake thoroughly and 
cork. Keep in a cool, dark place. 

Page 75- 



36 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



Solution No. 2. 

Rochelle salt gr. xii 

Silver nitrate gr. xvi 

Distilled water sufficient 

Alcohol 3i 

Dissolve the Rochelle salt in 8 ounces of distilled water, 
place in a clean porcelain or porcelain lined evaporating dish 
and heat to boiling point. When boiling gently add, while 
constantly stirring with a glass rod, the silver nitrate dissolved 
in distilled water, i ounce, and continue to boil gently until the 
solution, which will turn brown, and then black, turns gray. 
Then continue boiling for a minute or so longer, and add 3 
ounces of distilled water and filter, making up to 12 ounces 
through the filter with distilled water. Place in a clean bot- 
tle, add alcohol, 1 ounce, and shake vigorously, cork tightly, 
and keep in a cool, dark place. 

These solutions should be allowed to stand at least five or 
six hours before using. The glass having previously been 
cleaned is now leveled about any suitable support, so that none 
of the pieces used to level come out to the edge of the glass 
It should then be rinsed thoroughly with distilled water and the 
water tipped off the glass. Then mix equal parts of No. 1 and 
No. 2 solutions and pour the mixture on the glass as long as 
it will hold out. Any air bubbles should be broken down with 
the glass rod by touching them, and the solution made to cover 
the glass perfectly out to the edges. Allow to stand for an 
hour or more, then tip off the solution and rinse with clear 
water, and before drying amalgamate with solution of potas- 
sium and mercury cyanides made as follows : 
Solution No. 3. 

Potassium cyanide gr. viii 

Mercury cyanide gr. xvi 

Water sufficient 

Dissolve the salts separately in 8 fluid ounces of distilled 
water and add to sufficient distilled water to make one gallon. 

Place this in a sprinkler and sprinkle the silver covering 
until it begins to change color (lighten to about a lead color), 
then rinse immediately and thoroughly. When dry examine 
the face of the mirror to see if the plating is perfect, and if so 
paint it with asphaltum varnish, using a smooth, soft brush, 
which will not scratch the plate. The fingers must not touch 
the silver before it is painted or it will leave a mark. 

If these directions are followed a good mirror will be the 
result, but in this, as in everything else, it will be found easier 
after some practice. 

Golden Needles for Surgical Use are recommended by 
Dr. A. Wildt (Muen. Med. Wochenschr., 1910, 2005, through 
Pharm. Zentralh., No. sr, 1910), as they are more readily distin- 
guished from the tissues than are the more dully colored nickel 
plated needles. He states that they last much longer, do not rust, 
and the plating does not strip off as readily as in the case of the 
ordinary nickeled needles. 



Letters to the Editor. 



«' Who's to Blame?" 

To the Editor: 

Sir, — From time to time we read in the pharmaceutical press 
of this or that state having passed a law restricting the sale of 
habit forming drugs, as morphine and cocaine. Then we read 
that Congress has taken the matter up and will attempt to re- 
strict such sales through the interstate commerce act. 

At a recent meeting of the New York Deutscher Apotheker 
Verein (German Apothecaries' Society) the writer called at- 
tention to the sales of cocaine in one-eighths, in large quantity 
by a wholesale firm to some person unknown. This jobber was 
legally right in selling the drug. He was morally wrong in 
filling the order and encouraging future orders, for his knowl- 
edge of the customer's business was that no retail druggist 
-could possibly use the quantity in a legitimate manner. A reso- 
lution was adopted calling on the Board of Pharmacy to pub- 



lish the names of all retailers and wholesalers who sell these 
drugs. The secretary of the board answered that the sale 
of "cocaine is governed by the penal code and not by the phar- 
macy law of this state." 

This means that to follow up the resolution the subject mat- 
ter must be reported to the commissioner of police or superin- 
tendents in the various large cities of the state, which officials 
have the right to examine the record of sales by wholesalers to 
other persons, not necessarily retail druggists. As these police 
officials have other matters to attend to, little attention can be 
paid to one of the causes of crime, being busy detecting and 
arresting criminals after the crime has been committed. 

There is not a wholesale drug firm in the United States 
but knows the quantity of such drugs that can be used legiti- 
mately by the retail trade; and there are some conscientious 
jobbers who 'now restrict their sales to five ounce lots, one cus- 
tomer at a time, while there are others who will sell to the 
limit of the purchaser's purse or credit. Further investigation 
shows that some chemical firms have standing orders for co- 
caine in 1-16 ounce lots. 

What retail druggist buys cocaine hydrochloride in one- 
eighth or one-sixteenth ounce lots? In all my thirty years in 
the drug business I never heard of such sizes, except when co- 
caine was first introduced. 

We have been informed that one chemical firm had a stand- 
ing order for fifty ounces of cocaine in one-sixteenth ounce 
vials to be delivered weekly. Think of it, 800 vials weekly from 
one chemical firm. Another firm had a standing order for 100 
ounces in one-eighths, and one jobber sold to one person 900 
vials of one-eighths in two consecutive business days. Remem- 
ber that is only from one chemical firm. 

How many chemical and pharmaceutical houses sell cocaine 
under their label? Suppose that this one jobber bought from 
three or four chemical firms cocaine in one-eighths and one- 
sixteenths? The amount sold would be appalling. 

Now who's to blame? The manufacturer, the jobber, the 
retailer, or the peddler? 

And against this the retailer does not raise his voice in pro- 
test, but meekly submits to ordinances, laws and regulation of 
all sorts and from every quarter. It is high time that he pro- 
tested. S, V. B. Swann. 
New York, February 7, 191 1. 



Mr. Raubenheimer Does Not Like Our New Method of In- 
dexing, and Says So. 

To the Editor: 

Sir, — From time immemorial manuscripts, books, journals, 
etc., have been numbered at the top of the page. Even in the 
old, if not the oldest, manuscript, the Papyrus Ebers (4,000 to 
7,000 years old) the column numbers, from 1 to no, are placed 
over the first line in the middle of each column, as can be seen 
by the excellent reduced fac-simile in the American Druggist 
for January 23, 191 1. Now, with the beginning of the present 
volume, the American Druggist has changed its method of 
pagination by placing the 'consecutive page numbers, including 
covers and advertising pages, on top, and the reading page num- 
bers at the bottom. If the reverse was done I would not say a 
word, but to the adopted method I most seriously object, and I 
trust I voice the sentiment of a great many of your readers, 
especially those who bind the volumes for future reference. We 
bookworms are so used to look for the index page on top, that 
it will be a hardship in our old days to get used to numbers at 
the bottom. What confusion this will cause can be seen. Your 
semi-annual index will list that excellent paper by Dr. Walsh on 
"Ancient Problems in Modern Pharmacy," on page 38 (bottom) 
while page 37 (top) will contain entirely other reading matter, 
the one in issue of January 23 is on "Advertising." 

Yours for the good old-fashioned method of index pages on 
top. 

Otto Raubenheimer. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., January 24, 191 1. 



Index page ~6. 



I 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



37 



ADVERTISING v BUSINESS v ACCOUNTING 



Subscribers are cordially Invited to make Inquiries of this department and to communicate Information which they may 

possess regarding the subjects under discussit n. 



BUILDING UP A CANDY BUSINESS. 

By Bernard Foote, 

Archibald, Pa. 

A DRUGGIST who has no candy business to build up ought 
to get one. Not just for the fun of building it up, which 
is some pleasure indeed, but nowadays people expect to find 
candy in drug stores, expect to find good candy, and, besides — it 
pays. The druggist who considers this latter reason sordid and 
mercenary cannot evade the first one. He ought to sell candy to 
accommodate his customers, to give them something better than 
they get in the locality. 

Selling the Right Kind of Candy in the Right Way. 
Properly conducted, a candy department in almost any drug 
store does pay, pays net profits. It brings in cold cash, has no 
bad accounts nor bookkeepers, and is, besides, a feeder for other 
business. No. I do not mean that selling candy increases the de- 
mand for dyspepsia cures and toothache drops. It is the poor 
candy your competitor sells that does that. But the right kind 
of candy, sold in the right way, does get people into your store, 
and gets them into the habit of coming. 

The Right Kind of Candy for a Druggist 

to handle depends a whole lot upon the neighborhood and other 
conditions. The main idea, though, is to have a candy "that's 
different." You can hardly expect to get the candy business of 
the town if you have the same kind that every other store sells. 
Get an exclusive agency, if you can, of some good and rather 
expensive candy. Then start your shouting. If you have a 
good article of any kind that is different from the common run, 
you can generally convince a lot of people that it is better than 
what the other fellow has. So with candy be different. Let 
your store be known as the place where the highest grade can- 
dies in town are sold, and let the name of the candy you sell 
be continually before the public. Tell about its purity, cleanli- 
ness, wholesomeness and, above all, freshness. And do have it 
fresh. Do not overstock Get frequent shipments. It is a good 
idea to mark the date of arrival on each box of bulk goods, and 
use them in the order of their coming. A code should be used 
to mark package candy. The dates should be watched so that 
no stale stuff or even doubtful candy is sold. Keeping candy 
at an even temperature is just as important as having it fresh. 
Fresh stock can be easily spoiled by sudden changes in tempera- 
ture or by being kept in a warm place. Good candy keeps for 
some time if kept at a temperature of about 65 to 70° F. 

Proper Display of Candy 

is important and necessary, and especially so if you have much 
transient trade. It is surprising how much candy is sold when 
properly displayed. A plate class candy case, such as most show 
case works now turn out, clean, orderly and well filled with nice 
looking candy, just makes peoples' mouths water and loosens 
their pocketbooks. Every tray in the case ought to have a label 
bearing the name of the candy in it; the trays should be polished 
and well filled, and the bottom of the case free from pieces of 
chocolate. Have the case in a prominent part of the store, 
throw lots of light on it, and you will hear them say: "Doesn't 
that candy look tempting?" 

The Question of Window Displays. 

Window displays help considerably. Cleanliness, flowers, a 
few open boxes of chocolates, and, what is very important, a sign 
or two about your candy, its purity and freshness, all these com- 
bine to make effective windows. The glass display cases on 
soda tables are used quite a little for showing up candy. A 



good idea is to feature a single kind of bulk goods, having a 
card in each display calling attention to the particular merits 
of the candy displayed, and stating the price. I have seen a 
display of extra large montevideos sell candy to people whom 
I thought never ate any. 

The druggist whose candy stock consists of only rock candy 
and worm candy is making a mistake. The druggist who sells 
poor candy is also making a mistake. Candy is a legitimate line 
for a drug store, and good candy is an advertisement for the 
store that sells it — an advertisement that, instead of costing 
money, brings money in. If your candy is only medium grade, 
put in some good line, and let every one know about it. Don't keep, 
it a secret. Use your mailing list, your newspaper space, or short, 
crisp locals. Show up your goods to the best advantage, keep 
them in good shape; and I was going to say once more, do not 
sell any stale candy, but the fellows who make enough noise 
about their candy department never have stale goods. Their 
only trouble is to get fresh stock fast enough. 



ATTRACTING THE CROWDS. 



A Few Schemes That Have Successfully Aroused the Attention 
of Passersby to the Retail Store. 



By E. W. Spony. 
II. 

The various methods devised by successful retailers in every 
part of the country and which really attract attention are as 
numerous as the stars in the heavens. Some which were not 
well planned and carefully thought out have brought regrets 
rather than results to many retailers, while others, who have 
taken care to gauge the appropriateness of their innovation, as 
well as character of the trade they desired to attract, have found 
in new schemes, a realization of what they aimed at. Some new 
departures in the way of store advertising have often been found 
a positive means of increasing the daily receipts. Many ideas 
naturally come to the mind of an alert retailer, nearly all of 
which appear to him feasible at the time they dawn upon him. 
but the practicability of some of the ideas can only be learned 
by putting them into practice. Timeliness in studying the wants 
of the public enter into this problem of deciding what is and 
what is not a sound means of attracting attention. Below I 
outline a few schemes that have yielded tangible results. 

Displays where mechanical actions are revealed always have 
a tendency to attract passersby, most of whom are on the look- 
out for something new. A dealer in sporting goods located in 
New York placed in his window not long ago a motor car wheel 
with an automobile tire which the dealer wished to advertise. He 
placed on the floor of the window a patch of artificial green 
for grass and had the wheel roll from one end of the green to 
the other. The power was invisible. The wheel did not travel 
fast, but just crawled along. The crowd gaped in wild-eyed 
wonder at the phenomenon. 



Unusual Decoy Methods. 

A retailer whose store was located near a theater employed 
successfully a coupon system by which he gave to customers at 
his store certificates which were redeemable for tickets to the 
theater nearby the dealer when presented in sufficient number. 
Another retailer who profited by being located near a theater, 
gained the acquaintance of the management of the playhouse 
and arranged to have the actors enter into a little repartee in 
winch the retailer's name and a certain article sold by him 
Index page 77. 



38 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



should be mentioned in their lines. The plan worked out to 
the profit of the storekeeper. A department store in a large 
Eastern city arranged through its enterprising publicity agent 
to exhibit the entire outfit of the now famous Wellman ex- 
pedition, including the airship, equilibrator and kits which figured 
so prominently in the effort to cross the Atlantic. For many 
days the regular visitors at the store, and many others who had 
not been attracted before, called to view the romantic and al- 
most epoch-making paraphernalia. 

Money Lost and Found. 

In a large city a storekeeper on his way to open up his 
store one morning, hit upon the idea that people would be in- 
terested in the fact that he had found some money and wanted 
to return it to the proper owner. Forthwith he lettered a sign 
stating that he had found some money and if the loser would 
state the amount he or she lost and the location, so far as could 
be guessed, the dealer would be pleased to return it. During 
that day many persons visited the store, and many declared that 
they had lost various sums, ranging from 50 cents to $50. The 
dealer made note of each of the losses, stating at the same time 
to the unfortunates that he was not the finder of their losses. 
At the close of the day he totaled up the amount said to have 
been lost and came to the conclusion that $864.39 was lost in 
the neighborhood or that he had been the unconscious promoter 
of a guessing contest. He removed the sign from his window, in 
which he offered to return the money found, and substituted in 
its place, one which read, "$864.39 has been lost in the neigh- 
borhood of this store. I found 10 cents of it." This sign 
elicited some good natured humor from the regular patrons of 
the store. 

Coupons for a Ton of Coal. 

As the cold months came on, it occurred to a retailer in 
Providence, R. I., that it would be a good idea to issue coupons 
to be redeemed in a stated number for a ton of coal. Of course, 
it was nothing less than a profitsharing plan, and proved a 
most satisfactory inducement for those who pride themselves on 
ibeing ever on the alert to get something for nothing. The re- 
ceipts at the store increased each succeeding day after the cou- 
pon system was started, and the retailer was by no means a loser 
through his giving of tons of coal. 

A Scheme to Be Used with Discretion. 

An enterprising retailer in a New England city, while taking 
inventory found that he had a fine but surplus stock of good? 
in hand. He advertised them in the local papers at a reasonable 
price, and ended by saying that certain commodities would be re- 
duced in price each day 50 cents until all the goods were sold. 
Many women visited the store and selected what they wanted, 
and others waited day by day, always hoping that the "reduction 
days" would go on a while longer so that they could purchase 
what their hearts were set upon. The innovation was very suc- 
cessful, but such a proposition must be entered upon with dis- 
cretion, or a retailer will be doing business without profit. 

Freakish Inventions in Operation. 

Windows containing a revolving sign, advertising the name 
of a particular brand of goods, and especially when the sign 
is brightiy illuminated by electrical power, flashing now and 
again, are bound to appeal to the beholders if the window is 
attractively decked out in other particulars. Freakish inventions 
in operation always capture the curious. The pumpkin head 
with human face that has a flash of light on and off is always 
an attracting medium. 

A leading toy and novelty store in New York had an elab- 
orate window display a short while ago where miniature railroad 
tracks were laid out with speeding trains propelled by motor, 
and which seemed to be racing one another. In the center of the 
circular track were stationary engines also in operation. The 
window was finely conceived and throughout the exhibit the 
•crowd openly expressed appreciation. 

Index 1 



Those stores that deal in game or other kindred lines, or in 
fact any line, may employ a spurting fountain. Small puppies 
in dry environment are also a delight to all passersby, and many 
stores and conservative houses take advantage of the advertising 
brought about through these displays. 

Literary Ideas. 

A New York retailer with a literary bent employed an origi- 
nal method of attracting customers. He had ten thousand lit- 
tle pamphlets printed, which contained shrewd and humorous 
observations, each in a pithy paragraph. He distributed the 
pamphlets around and they were sought after so that this dealer 
taxed his powers of observation some more and got out material 
for two more pamphlets, both of which he distributed in ten 
thousand lots. He named the pamphlet "St. Johnism," as his 
name was St. John, and he did business individually under his 
own name. 

A retailer in a western city with an eye out for new trade, 
after he had gone through the day's mail, preserved the en- 
velopes addressed to him and placed therein circulars describing 
the special offerings to be had at his store. These envelopes 
with the circulars inside he gave to the errand boy about the 
place, and Young America in his rompings about town dropped 
a letter here and there on the sidewalk. Most persons will stoop 
to pick up an envelope out of curiosity, and they did in these 
instances. A little note contained in the envelope with the 
circular stated that upon presentation of the note at the store 
the finder would be rewarded. While the reward was not par- 
ticularly bountiful, nevertheless, it represented enough value to 
convince the finder that the dealer was a generous and rather 
resourceful sort of a chap, while if the reward had not been 
at least of some value the "finders" might have gone off in 
bitterness if not in anger. 

In connection with a display of Oriental products a dealer 
in novelty goods displayed in his window spears, coins and cur- 
rency of that foreign port, imported grass and palm bark, native 
hats of the Oriental section, all of which had a tendency to rivet 
the attention of passersby. This was an educational exhibit 
which stimulated sales and met with a pleasing reception. This 
is convincing evidence that the public is ever ready to encourage 
enterprise. 



Street Car Advertising for Retailers. 

The average street car trip occupies fifteen to twenty minutes, 
and the passenger, having time to "kill," cannot escape reading 
the car signs which confront him. This basic reason for the 
success of street cars as an advertising medium is no longer 
theoretical It is proved in practice. 

Any advertiser, be he manufacturer or retailer, can use street 
car advertising to advantage, says C. N. Grieg in Signs of the 
Times. In this respect the medium is even more flexible than 
the daily newspaper. The small retailer in most of our larger 
cities can, for example, confine his advertising to the 100 or 200 
street cars tributary to his place of business, having the same 
display per car as the big department store or national advertiser 
who uses every car in town. Should this small advertiser use 
the big daily paper, nine-tenths of its output would be waste cir- 
culation, so far as its sales making ability for him is concerned. 

It is this very flexibility in street car advertising that also 
makes this medium so useful in the national advertising cam- 
paign. The copy and sales plan can be economically tested in 
three or more cities before given extended or national currency; 
the advertising can be confined, if need be, to points where sales 
need stimulating; special conditions can be met with special 
copy. 



«« Best on the Market." 

I have taken the American Druggist for one year and find 
it the best drug journal there is on the market. I am sending 
you cash for a renewal. R. O. McGee. 

Toledo, Ohio. February 11, 191 1. 

ige 78. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



39 



SOME ADS WORTH NOTICING. 

By Frank Farrington, 
Delhi, N. Y. 

WHEN a man runs across a good advertisement, whether of 
his own or some other line of goods, he may well take 
particular notice of it and try to duplicate its good features. 

The druggist who would be a good advertiser and get the 
most out of the space he uses must himself be a student of ad- 
vertising, looking through all kinds of publications, especially 
the newspapers, and making notes of the points that please him 
and clipping out sample ads for use in helping him to write 
others as good. One ad may suggest a good heading, another 
a new typographical form that is distinctive, another a form of 
border that will make the ad stand out prominently. Every ad- 
vertiser can learn something from every other advertiser, either 
in the way of what to do or in the way of what not to do. 

A Good Head Line. 

The ad of the Central Drug Store, Oil City, Pa., shows a 
head line that is one of the easiest to read and that tells more 
than most of us try to put into our headings. If a man uses 
this size space, or larger, he may well make use of some of this 
style of head lines, particularly in the writing of advertisements 
in which there is little space needed for the body of the ad If 
this heading had been set up in capitals of any sort, and espe- 
cially those slender, slivery letters with which the artistic minded 
printer loves to embellish the paper, no one could have read it 
without taking a good deal of pains and more time than would 
willingly have been given. There is no trouble at all in getting 
this head line read through. 



" There's just one Drug Store where I 
know I get exactly what I ask for." 

When you hear that remark you can take it for granted the 
speaker means us. Whatever you want from any drug store can 
be had here. If we haven't got it we will get it for you. There's 
never a fear of disappointment. You get what you ask for or 
what your doctor wants you to have or you get nothing. You 
never get something just as good here because we only have 
the best. 

Does not this assurance warrant your trading here? We 
think so. 

Central Drug Store 

Levi Block, 107 Center Street. 
Both phones and delivery by messenger. 

The City Circular. 

From the Reldnas Hall Pharmacy, Amsterdam avenue, New 
York, we have a sample of a very nicely printed circular about 
7 by 14 inches. This is a style of advertising that we do not 
believe pays very large returns, though it is not as expensive as 
some. The reason why this might not be as profitable is that 
it is not so constructed as to compel attention to any one point. 
It will impress any one who reads it, but it is rather unlikely 
that it will be read. In all probability the thing most likely to 
be noticed by a housewife, and perhaps remembered, is the few 
lines of prices on soaps at the foot of the circular. 

In this day of rush the circular that gets read and that gets 
under the belt of the prospective buyer must do it in very brief 
words. There must be nothing to distract the eye or the mind 
from the one point that it is desirable to impress. 

The circular must be more catchily worded than the news- 
paper adventisement, because every one is predisposed against 
the former. One runs upon an advertisement in a paper inad- 
vertently and at a time when net in a hurry perhaps. But the 
circular is obviously an advertisement and is taken up in the 
hand with that understanding. It must speak its piece quickly 
and briefly and, of course, well in order to produce results. 

Index 



The circular or the form letter are necessary to the smaller 
dealers in a city where they cannot use the papers, but greater 
care must be exercised in preparing such advertising than in 
getting up almost any other. 

Special Borders, 

Something special in a border that will identify its user by 
reason of some individual peculiarity is often a good thing. 
There are border designs that possess the ability to focus atten- 
tion on account of some peculiarity of construction, and we 
show one of these in the advertisement of the American Drug 
Store (Traverse City, Mich.) 

The use of the arrow in advertising has become recently 
quite common, though it is still mainly adapted by the large ad- 
vertisers. Such a plan for getting the reader's eye on the ad 




WITCH HAZEL CREAM 
MOCKS BLUSTtRY WINTER 
WEATHER. 

I want you to prove this to 
your own complexion and com- 
fort. 

I want you to know what it is 
to go through this winter with 
skin soft and velvety — free fiorn 
chap and windburn — proof 
again-.t frost, glare and blizzard. 

The trial offer, a full week's 
use. proves the cream. 

The large, full sized, four- 
ounce bottle is your complexion 
insurance for two full months. 

Use it every day. 

Keep your skin soft, clean and 
presentable. Housework, out-of- 
door work, driving, sleighrlding, 
snowshoeing — none of these 
have any effect on hands and 
face projected by Witch Hazel 
Cream. 

Large bottle, 25c. 



American) 
Drug Store 



CURE 



Is a sp endid remedy for 
the cure and immediate 
relief of Frost Bite. 
One application will re- 
lieve the intense itching 
that always comes with 
frost bite and if used 
persistently will effect 
a cure. 25 cents ihe bot- 
tle. 

W_ F. Sulz&achsr 



Drug Store 




by mechanical means is better than that of using sensational 
head lines which have little or no reference to the subject mat- 
ter beneath them. The body of this American Drug Store ad 
is good, too, the quality of it not depending entirely upon thi 
border by any means. 

The ad of the drug store of W. F. Sulzbacher, Chillicothe, 
Ohio, is another sample of an unique border. It does not seem 
to me that this one is particularly good. A great deal of space 
is given up to a fancy design which does not possess any power 
to focus attention except that of the black ink it puts on. I 
believe that if the border design had been entirely omitted in 
this instance the white paper would have set off the particularly 
well written advertisement better than the fancy head. White 
space, if it can be afforded, often makes the best kind of a 
border. 

t>age 79. 



40 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



BOB SAWYER OUTDONE. 

A story of a druggist's career in business, which is published 
in the Bulletin of Pharmacy for October as the autobiography 
of O. P. McPherson, of Gloster, Miss., is so out of the usual, 
so entertaining and suggestive, as to be worthy of a wider 
circulation, and we consequently reproduce it. Some of the in- 
cidents narrated would indicate that the author has read his 
Dickens to profit, as, where he advertises himself in a church. 
But we shall, with the Bulletin's permission, allow Mr. Mc- 
Pherson to tell his own story. He says : 

I was born March 23, 1884, and was reared on a farm near 
Utica, Miss. At the age of fifteen I went to work in the drug 
store of S. E. Dudley & Sons in Utica. Remaining there until 
April, 1902, I obtained a position with the Gloster Drug Com- 
pany, of Gloster, Miss., succeeding one of the best pharmacists 
in the south. This man, however, had made a dispensing error 
and every one was afraid of the store. Just how this fear 
on the part of the community was overcome I shall now en- 
deavor to describe. 

Started In by Being Arrested. 

After taking charge of the store I found in a rear room a 
great quantity of empty bottles. In these I put colored water 
of various hues, and then I carefully arranged the bottles on 
the shelves. The next morning I got hold of a street wagon, 
drove it up to the front door, ostentatiously threw the whole 
collection of filled bottles into it, and caused the very street 
gutters to become filled with what was supposed to be old med- 
icine. For this I was arrested and made to pay a $50 fine, 
which was charged up to the advertising account. 

I now felt that I was pretty well known in the business sec- 
tion of the town. I heard the incident discussed on every hand, 
and found that it had met with the approval of every one, and 
that the physicians began to send in more prescriptions. Being 
a single man at that time I equipped a room in the rear of the 
store, slept there, and for the first three months never left the 
place at all except at meal hours and for two church services 
on the Sabbath. Speaking of church, I am reminded that here 
is where I made another hit in advertising. 

Unique Church Advertising. 

I procured a squeaking pair of shoes, and then I would al- 
ways take my seat up in the front of the church near the pul- 
pit. Prior to entering the church, however, I would arrange 
with a messenger boy to come after me about the middle of 
the service, bringing a piece of paper supposed to be a prescrip- 
tion. This would cause me to leave the church and my shoes 
were sure to attract attention. Of course this little incident 
didn't occur at every service, but it happened often enough to 
make people think that I was the busiest prescription man in 
town. 

During those days, too, I made a specialty of having en- 
gagements with young ladies, but very soon business became so 
rushing that I had to cut this part of the programme out. In 
order to chop off too much social intercourse I hung a sign 
over the prescription desk reading as follows : "No questions 
answered while filling prescriptions." The other side of the 
card read : "No prescriptions filled while answering questions." 
Well, my experience with the Gloster Drug Company covered 
a period of sixteen months, at the end of which time the busi- 
ness was sold at a profit of $4,000. In disposing of the store 
for my employers, however, I sold myself out of a job, and it 
was about this time, too, that I took unto myself a wife. 

During the next two years different positions presented 
themselves and were accepted. In the meantime the family 
began to increase, and soon I sold myself out of another job. 
Having no time to lose I accepted a position as a traveling 
salesman, handling nonsecrets and the like. During this period 
some interesting things happened, but I won't stop to relate 
them now, particularly since I hope that no other druggist will 
ever have to go on the road. 

Index 



Starting in Business with 35 Cents. 

One August afternoon 1 resolved to quit the road, return 
to Gloster, and embark in the retail business again. When I 
reached here I had the sum of 35 cents in my pocket, and I 
was accompanied by a sick wife and a baby. I spent the 35 
cents for a hair cut and a package of cheroots. I told all my 
friends that I was here to go into business. After a few days 
spent in figuring around, during which time no one offered to 
go in with me and furnish the money, I concluded that I would 
try my face on the Van Vleet-Mansfield Company, of Memphis, 
Tenn., for an opening stock, and as references I gave them the 
names of a lot of church members whom I had formerly dis- 
turbed with my squeaking shoes, not to mention the cashiers 
of several banks, etc. 

To my surprise I soon received a letter from Mr. P. P. Van 
Vleet, telling me that I could get the stuff. (I may add here 
that my next boy was named Percy Van Vleet McPherson.) 
After getting this letter I at once rented the corner of a ware- 
room pretty well out of town and began putting it in order. 
To my surprise there walked in the first afternoon a man who 
offered to put up a thousand dollars and go in with me. At 
first I refused (of course, for effect), but later and with great 
apparent reluctance I accepted his proposition, only to find that 
he had but $450 in cash. I took what he had obligingly, and it 
was from that $450 that the present "Busy Corner" sprang. 

Drew on His Nerve. 

After the first year I bought a half-interest in the store, and 
in three years I had paid my partner a total of $2,750 in cash. 
Then I resolved to buy him out entirely, and so gave him 
$1,400 for his interest. Please don't understand me to say that 
I had that much cash. I offered him $1,000 in notes and agreed 
to pay the balance at the rate of $100 a month. He accepted at 
once, and I drew upon my nerve and sent two notes of $500 
each to a wholesale house and asked them to indorse them, 
which they did. 

Well, at that time the store had $53 in bank and owed $1,300 
in outstanding accounts. The latter I assumed and finally paid 
off, but in the meantime my wife's health had grown so had. 
and her condition had become so critical, that the local physi- 
cians advised me to send her to New Orleans to the sanitarium. 
Fortunately or unfortunately, I had never done any business in 
New Orleans, and I knew of no one upon whom I could call 
in time of distress. I determined, however, to send my wife 
there and to demand the best the town had, even though I 
knew the cost would be in the neighborhood of $1,000. I got 
one of the Gloster physicians and his wife to go along and make 
all the arrangements. Immediately after they left I wrote 
some eight or ten business houses in New Orleans a letter like 
this: 

"Gentlemen: Owing to the critical illness of my wife I have 
been compelled to send her to the Touro Infirmary. Because of 
important business matters, however, I could not go with her, 
but upon leaving home I instructed her to have the infirmary 
call upon you if anything was needed before I got there, which 
will be within some three or four days. Thanking you in ad- 
vance, I am, etc." 

It Worked ! 

My idea was that they would call up the institution and thus 
strengthen my standing there. Surely enough, when 1 walked 
in several days later, I heard a conversation over the phone 
which showed me that my letter was having the desired effect. 
Soon after 'playing doctor on the entire push and bousing the 
nurses around a little I went to the head office to ascertain 
how much they were expecting of me since I was demanding 
a great deal of them. The manager thereupon declared that 
his terms were $25 a week in advance, and that the operation 
would cost about $200. I commented a little on the manage- 
ment of the place, as though I knew all about it, but as a mat- 
(Continued on page 45.) 

age So. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




LESS INVESTMENT, BETTER STOCK, LARGER PROFITS 

i««BB«ag«™ ggjgatB— are m i i l l ii il l i ph i ni i i i innn in i i i i i i i w wwmB^ mmmvw ii i immiiiiMirr 

H A large part of the investment in a retail drug stock is in toilet articles, sun- 
dries and other goods whose sale may be increased by your individual enterprise. 

4f Every dollar in this class of goods may be turned over through demand cre- 
ated largely by your own efforts and in these lines you have the best opportunity 
for demonstration of ability as a merchant. 

In selling pharmaceuticals you are a professional man and have but limited 
scope for the exercise of the merchant's methods and faculties. Pharmaceutic- 
als are dispensed chiefly upon physical needs which are beyond your control and 
sales depend on reluctant customers restricted by prescriptions. 

Since pharmaceutical sales are relatively limited and cannot be created with 
the same ease as in other stocks is it not wise to avoid larger investments than 
necessary to an adequate assortment, turning working capital as far as possible 
into lines which can be sold more readily by direct efforts? 

The Lilly Policy recognizes this situation and places you in position to buy 
pharmaceuticals as needed on the most favorable terms. 

€ You are given best discount — 40 per cent. — on Lilly specifications through the 
jobber on orders of any size without quantity obligations. This leaves you free 
to buy according to the demands of trade and liberates capital from slow mov- 
ing stocks for reinvestment where it can be turned more rapidly. 

^1 Specify Lilly Pharmaceuticals on your drug order to the jobber. It will en- 
able you to do business on less capital, have a better, cleaner stock and make 
more money. 

ELI LILLY & COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK CHICAGO ST. LOUIS KANSAS CITY NEW ORLEAN? 



Kindly mention AMERICAN DRU GGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



40b 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 




mm — m 



WBBKBBBBBSM 




Insist on getting the Can with the Chelco Seal 



LIQUID PRODUCTS in 

"AMERICAN" CANS 



with the Chelco Nozzle and Seal 

SELL MORE READILY 

than in any other Package 

THE ONLY SEAL 

that is neat and attractive in appearance, that can 
be opened and closed with the fingers, and that is 

ALWAYS TIGHT 

Seal is always on the Can. 

Never becomes lost or mislaid, 

No leakage. No evaporation. 
No cork to crumble and get into the Varnish or 

other contents. 
Clean, effective and durable. 

AMERICAN CAN COMPANY 

SOLE SELLING AGENTS 

New York Chicago San Francisco 

Offices in all Principal Cities. 



THE HANDSOMEST PACKAGES OF 



Talcum Powder 

VIOLET No. 17 ROSE No. 20 

10, 15 and 25c Sellers. 
2}i oz. round, 4 oz. oval, 8 oz. dome top, 1 lb. canisters. 
Soft, white, velvety powder nicely perfumed. 
Your name on label advertising yourself. 
Prices to make you 100% profit. 
Send for sample. 



HENRY K. WAMPOLE & COMPANY, Inc. 

Manufacturing Pharmacists Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



„ Kindly mention AMERICAN DRUGGIST when writing to Advertisers. 



AMERICAN DRUGGIST AND PHARMACEUTICAL RECORD. 



44a 



Alphabetical Index to Advertisers 



Where numbers are omitted, the advertisement appears In alternate Issut 
For Classified Index and Bayers' Guide See Panes 8 and 9 



Page. 

Abbott Alkaloidal Co — 

Albany Chemical Co — 

Albany College of Pharmacy 19 

Albertype Co